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Hair Loss

debsue420
Posts: 7
Joined: Jun 2019

Hi Everyone, This is my first post. Have had 4 chemos. The last one was 2 wks ago & started the Taxol & Caboplatin. Have 3 more Chemos coming up  every 3 wks.Today brushing my hair, twice, with lots of hair coming out on the brush. Guess this is the beginning of hair loss. Not worried about hair loss, it'll grow back.Have Stage 3 Uterine Cancer. My profile explains all. Just wanted to post & share with someone that'll understand.Wishing Good Luck to all in their fight against Cancer & into Remission.

EZLiving66's picture
EZLiving66
Posts: 1345
Joined: Oct 2015

Welcome to the board! There are ladies here with every type of uterine cancer and probably have as much knowledge as some of our doctors. I have UPSC, Stage II, Grade 3. In September, I will be four years NED (No Evidence of Disease). There is a light at the end of this awful tunnel! 

Love,

Eldri

CheeseQueen57's picture
CheeseQueen57
Posts: 804
Joined: Feb 2016

Although losing your hair is quite traumatic you’ll find after a while it’s kinda nice not having to fuss with it for a while. Mine came back even better than before. When someone compliments my hair, I always say, “ It’s just nice to have hair!”  Hang in there baby!  We’ve got your back. 

whitby2773
Posts: 27
Joined: Jun 2019

When your chemo is finished, and after getting the go ahead from your drs, take the opportunity to get a kick-arse tattoo across your scalp!  If you're not into tattoos, your hair will cover it up.  But you'll always know you're a bad arse and a fighter.  :)

Wishing you all the best in your treatments, and a full and fast run into remission!

debsue420
Posts: 7
Joined: Jun 2019

Thanks everyone for the support. Will be a survivor & will think about the head tattoo. Keep the faith.

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

DebSue420, I'm diagnosed with Stage 3 endometrial cancer but as far as O know I will be treated with the same chemo therapy as u. I know everyone's body responds differently but much doctor says I won't get sick a d if I do they'll give me med for that. Do u mind sharing your experiences with the side effects?

Hope you're feeling well!

 

ConnieSW's picture
ConnieSW
Posts: 1442
Joined: Jun 2012

I look forward to getting to know you.  Thanks for filling out an About Me page. 

NoTimeForCancer's picture
NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 2585
Joined: Mar 2013

debsue, as Connie said, glad you found us.  Please don't hesitate to ask anything, and when you are having a bad day and want to vent, we are here for that as well.  

debsue420
Posts: 7
Joined: Jun 2019

2 days ago ther hair was falling out like a cat shedding. So last night my Sweetest Hubby cut it down to about a 1/4 inch. Tonight he'll use a comb/scissors & cut it as low as he can. Think this was harder for him than me cause he thought I'd be upset but I wasn't. Knew this was part of the process so was ready. Got some scarves, hats & even a wig..so bring it on. To be honest am hoping I'll keep the lashes & eyebrows, that will be harder. But it is what is. Keep the Faith

ConnieSW's picture
ConnieSW
Posts: 1442
Joined: Jun 2012

The lashes and eyebrows were harder for me. Luckily they came out farther along and returned faster. Actually they really only thinned so a bit of eyebrow powder helped a lot. Surprisingly the loss of nose hair was most annoying. 

cmb's picture
cmb
Posts: 358
Joined: Jan 2018

I was okay with losing my hair – it was never that great to begin with and I had worn hats and wigs for years before. But I hated losing my eyelashes. Not only did I feel it really made me look like I was sick, but I hadn't realized how much crap they kept out of your eyes until they were gone. I even tried false eyelashes for a couple of special events during that period. But without my own eyelashes to use as a guide, I couldn't get them positioned correctly. However, as others have said, the lashes fell out much later than my hair and grew back first.

evolo58
Posts: 293
Joined: Dec 2017

For years, I thought it a curse. But since they were so short to begin with, it was not as noticable when they fell out.

The brows bothered me the most. One thing now, though, is that I can apply brow pencil like a boss if need be. I rarely wear makeup, so I thought that amusing. 

My chin hairs, however, were among the first to grow in once the hair fell out. Gee. Thanks. 

CheeseQueen57's picture
CheeseQueen57
Posts: 804
Joined: Feb 2016

the hair on my armpits and legs hardly need to be shaved now. Hair did not grow back. 

MAbound
Posts: 863
Joined: Jun 2016

I thought I just got lucky by switching to Taxotere, but maybe it was the Megace since we have that in common? I've been off of it 9 months now, though, and still no armpit or much leg hair.

Soup52's picture
Soup52
Posts: 902
Joined: Jan 2016

Same for me, but I wish chin hairs were still gone!

cmb's picture
cmb
Posts: 358
Joined: Jan 2018

It's been about 2 years since my last chemo and the hair on my body has never grown back like it was. I rarely need to shave my arm pits or legs. Unfortunately my head hair, which was thin to start with, also grew back very sparsely. I had been hoping for different hair like some women got after treatment, but what came back is exactly the same color and texture as before, just a way lot less.

Armywife's picture
Armywife
Posts: 294
Joined: Feb 2018

You'll find so much support here.  My husband helped me cut my hair as well, and though it was unnerving and HOT to wear a wig in south Texas in the summer, I got used to it.  Like CMB, my hair was thin to begin with and came back exactly the same color and texture but thinner.  I'm grateful to have it though.  And I have to say, the feel of a shower on my bald head was luxurious.  Best wishes as you continue treatment.  It's do-able!!

barnyardgal
Posts: 212
Joined: Oct 2017

After treatment my hair grew back normally, except it's a bit thicker and a little curly. Per my Dr recommendation I added super B complex to my supplements and that may have helped as well.

Quilter_1's picture
Quilter_1
Posts: 43
Joined: Mar 2019

For me, losing my hair was devastating.  I felt like it took away my appearance of wellbeing.  I always wore a slouchy hat in the house and never left the house without my wig, the only person who saw me without a head covering was my white knight of a husband.  I finished up chemo March 5 and today I have a scant inch of gray hair.  As soon as it is long enough, my hairdresser and long time friend is going to color it back to my luxurious brown, again.  We all react differently, I don’t think there is a wrong reaction.  Hang in there.  

PS:  I have a class reunion October 5, I hope to be rocking a cute, fringy pixie cut by then.

BluebirdOne's picture
BluebirdOne
Posts: 195
Joined: Jul 2018

Losing my hair was the worst for me because I only told my closest friends and family about my cancer. During treatment I was too emotionally fragile to handle much interaction with people outside my circle so it was very difficult for me to risk encountering "friends" when I felt well enough to go out. My hair started to grow back around Christmas and I have only needed one haircut since then to even it out. It is still very short and very white with a small amount of gray and is pretty much the same thickness and texture. I have decided to continue with the short hair as so many people like it (I keep thinking they are humoring the lady with the cancer) and as it is so easy to care for, unlike my old hair which needed cutting and dying once a month. 

On a sadder note, it seems like I am being surrounded with an epidemic of cancer, a friend's two year old grandchild with a rare sarcoma, two friend's husbands and a female friend all have been diagnosed in a row. One husband has stage IV rare sarcoma, the other a stage IV prostate, my friend a stage III breast cancer. None of us except the baby are young, but this seems ridiculous. 

Denise 

Mary929
Posts: 1
Joined: Jun 2019

My mother is wondering if any of you have used products that help with the Follicle pain that comes along with losing her hair. Are there certain lotions or hair conditioners you'd recommend?

Thanks for your help ,

Laughing

Mary's Daughter

Quilter_1's picture
Quilter_1
Posts: 43
Joined: Mar 2019

I didn’t have pain, but, I had itching.  I used otc hydrocortisone cream.

BluebirdOne's picture
BluebirdOne
Posts: 195
Joined: Jul 2018

hot, hot, hot! It did not last very long for me if that is any consolation. 

Denise 

barnyardgal
Posts: 212
Joined: Oct 2017

My head felt better after I shaved it. But coconut oil is supposed to help if she needs it. A gentle shampoo for the head, like baby shampoo, is a good idea.

Canary's picture
Canary
Posts: 22
Joined: Aug 2018

I was traveling the day my hair started to fall out and the pain was intense. Upon arriving home late that night, i had my son shave it to 1/8 of an inch. It helped a lot just getting the weight off of the follicles. As my hair continued to fall out the pain really decreased. I never lost all of my hair (kept a little on top) but the pain didn’t last but a few weeks and got less as it went along. It has been a little over 6 months since my last chemo and i have very soft wavy hair that is almost 3 inches long. I always had very straight hair before and really love the soft waves. 

txtrisha55's picture
txtrisha55
Posts: 684
Joined: Apr 2011

Welcome to the board.  Best group of ladies.  I come back now and again.  I am an 8 year survivor of MMMT STage 3 Grade 3 uterine cancer.  6 treatments of Carbo / Taxel and no radiation.  The hair loss was no big deal for me, I know that it is for some ladies but I loved it.  Yes it does grow back most of the time.  I have read on here that some ladies hair did not grow back.  Why I do not know.  I keep my hair very short now.  I did not wear a wig, sometimes wore a hat or scarf but in Texas in 100 degree heat that summer there is no way it stayed on long.  I got good at shaving my head to keep it bald during the time of treatment.  Once it stopped hair grew back, different texture and a bit curly.  Hate it.  So I keep it about an inch now, when it gets to long (about 2") I have to cut it because it sticks out all over the place. I have a frriend at my work who is now lossing her hair because of chemo treatment for breast cancer, she has already got 2 wigs and several scarfs that she plans to wear. Each person is different as each cancer is differnt and the side effects for each person is different.  Good Luck on your journey.  trish

LisaPizza's picture
LisaPizza
Posts: 214
Joined: Feb 2018

I'm totally the same about me new hair ... short short short or else it sticks out.

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

I just got told yesterday that that I will be needing to  have chemo following my hysterectomy though my pathology report is not back yet. I'm feeling very overwhelmed about the chemo process and especially losing my hair. I know it'll eventually grow back after treatment but it's taken so long for it to get long I feel like I'm going to loose my identity. I'm also worried about looking sick or scary to my son . Any thoughts on how to stay positive? Anyone order a wig online

Donswife48
Posts: 293
Joined: Nov 2015

I know chemo is scary, and all the things that go with it.  I had long hair, but got it cut short when I found out I had cancer so I had time to get use to a short do.  Then after my first chemo, I had it buzzed (don't do that as it only caused a itchy rash).  Also, check with your local American Cancer Society office.  My office gave me a wig and hat, plus had a group event where we were given makeup tips, and a bag full of makeup.  Plus, they showed us how to take a medium t-shirt, cut off the body, fold and wrap and twist to create a soft head covering.  It was a lot of fun.  I would suggest you try something similar for you and your son.  That way he will be part of the process and know that mom is still "mom".  Last, I bought 5 wigs (cheap) from Ebay.  I had colors, and different lenghts.  I wore a couple of them once or twice, didn't like the feel of the wig on my head.  I also bought hats and scarves, learned how to tie and twist scarves to have fun and colorful head covering.  In the end, I just preferred not to wear anything on my head.  Right now you're feeling overwhelmed, and I'm sure you are probably overthinking of all the possibilities.  Once you being treatment, I hope you will feel more in charge.  Hugs Nancy

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Thank you so much for Nancy for all of your suggestions and encouragement! I will definitely look into where the local American Cancer Society office is. How do u know what size wig to purchase? Do u have to wait until your bald to measure your head for 1?. I was hoping to get 1 before I started treatment and losing my hair.

Hugs to you!

Ribbons's picture
Ribbons
Posts: 73
Joined: Jan 2019

My last chemo was the middle of Feb. (I was 1A, grade 3, with clear cell) and now I have a good 2" of new hair, it is a little bit curly. When mine fell out it did not hurt or itch, it felt weirdly good to pull it out! then trimmed what was left to about 1/4". I was very fortunate that this was all in the winter, so I mostly wore a stocking cap. The eyebrows are hard, I thought I looked sickly without them, but they were the last to go and grew back quickly. I did get a wig, a good place online is called Cysterwigs. I found that a lace front with a monofilament part looks the most natural. Yesterday I finally ditched the wig and ventured out to town with just my own hair. Everyone says it looks good. Just try to keep a positive attitude and know that you can get through it. In the middle of treatment it seems like forever, but then you will be done and you can put it behind you. Don't know how old your son is, but children pick up on the attitudes of the adults they are with, so dont be too worried about your hair and he should be fine. Also, be careful about what you read, stay informed, but try to take in all the positive things and don't dwell on the negative.

txtrisha55's picture
txtrisha55
Posts: 684
Joined: Apr 2011

Glad you found this site.  Lots of information here. Lots of wonderful ladies for support to.  On the start of the discussion boards there is a link on the left hand side for Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products.  Also my Doctor ask me if I wanted a peescription for a wig as some insurance companies help pay for that.   I think you will be surprized with a reaction from your son and he will not think you look scary or sick, except for the days you may feel a bit down.  I was 55 when a was told I had stage 3 grade 3 cancer while at work on the phone on April 1st 2011.  Thankfully at the time I had an office with a door and I got up shut the door, then got on google.  BIG MISTAKE!  Too much negative stuff out there.  Started crying cause I knew I was going to die with all the statistics  on the Dr Web.  It took a bit of time but I had lots of sayings and quotes on my bullitin board, I had two 1. When you are worried -- I will tell you horrible stories about how much worse it could be until you quit whining, ya big baby! from a friend and Put your Big Girl Panties on and Deal with it!.  I started thinking that those statistics are not me and I am not included in them so it does not included me.  I found this website and read some of the stories and stuff the ladies were saying...You are a Statistic of One.  You are your own advocate.  Hair will grow back, if it doesn't think of all the fun you can have with different wigs...short curly red head one day, the next long dark and straight.  Go with a Pink, purple or blue wig.  It is scary being told you have cancer but get your core support group around you and do not worry about the others, they will suprise you too.  There will be some that pull away mainly because they do not know what to say and they do not like being around "sick" people.  Others will surprise you and step up and help in ways you do not expect.  I am a Eight year survivor of a grade 3 cancer.  It is doable.  It is surviable.  You may not enjoy the journey but with the support of family and friends you can make it thorugh it. One day at a time.  Thank deep breaths.  Say your prayers. Find a way to get a postive attitude, it is hard to do every single day but if you can do it more then feeling down, it will be a good thing.  First positive thing is they found it. Second, They removed it. Third, Now they will try and kill any remaining cells with the chemo.   Come back to this site and vent, cry, and bring the good news too.  This site is for all of it and the ladies will be here to help and listen and give cyber hugs and kisses.   Praying you find your way through it. trish

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Trish,  1st I'm so happy for you that your an 8 year survivor! 

Thank you for your encouragement! You are right about that I need to stay positive and take it it one day at a time. I'm hoping as soon as I  can catch my breath from all the shock that I'll be able to do so. I already feel blessed to be surrounded by all of u ladies who can listen and understand exactly what I'm feeling and going through . 

MAbound
Posts: 863
Joined: Jun 2016

I'm so sorry that you needed to find us, but having done so your heartbreaking screen name is no longer apt because you now have all of us to help you along this journey you unexpectedly find yourself on. It's true that no one can do what has to be done for you, but we're here to help you deal with this.

It would really help to know a little more about yourself and how this all came about for you. You sound young (this type of cancer tends to hit around menopause) and there are members who will be of a similar age to you that will have had similar issues to cope with.

I don't blame you for worrying about your hair. Losing it, we face losing part of what is our identity and none of us wants the world to see us as sick. There is a product out there called a "cool cap" that might preserve your hair through chemo that would be an out-of-pocket expense for you, but so is buying a wig or other headwear, so you'd have to weigh those various costs for your circumstances. It's even more critical that you look into options for keeping your feet and hands cold during chemo to prevent a condition called chemo induced peripheral neuropathy.

There is a big learning curve when you get this diagnosis and there is a lot of information on this website that you will find very helpful. The search engine isn't all that great though, so if you have a question you can't find an answer to, just ask because we don't mind resharing what we've learned along our journeys.

The big thing is to take things step-by-step and not get ahead of yourself worrying about things that you read about or are told by well meaning friends and relatives. Most importantly, don't look up statistics!  The science on beating this cancer or living with it long term has been changing at such a rapid pace in recent years that a lot of what you find on the internet is going to be obsolete. Statistics are generalities that don't really apply to individuals, in any case. You and what you bring to the table are unique.

 

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Thank you so much MAbound for your response and encouragement! I'm thankful a nurse informed me if this sight for support. 1st God bless you all in your own health journeys and I hope each day everyone feels a little better and is on their way to go health.

I'm 44. I originally was told that I had endometrial cancer and they weren't sure why I had it at such a young age thing that I hadn't been through menopause . My doctor originally thought that I would only need a hysterectomy but we soon found out that my right ovary was enlarged and after the hysterectomy two weeks ago it concluded that ovary also had cancer in it. So I'm just in the beginning stages of all of this and I haven't really told many people yet including my 22 year old son. I'm thankful that I have a very supportive fiance but haven't want to scare others I have kept it to myself I know once treatment starts in a few weeks I'll have no choice to they letting my family and friends know since I have to be getting chemo I'm scared and overwhelmed and I don't want them to feel the same. I feel at loss as I know all of you probably did when you got your diagnosis. And there's so many questions and uncertainties that I find myself replaying over and over in my mind and I know I just need to take it step-by-step as you said.

The nurse that helps me get connected on this the state also informed me have the cooling cap and said it might be something that I might want to consider. I just don't want to look scary to my son I guess is where I'm at. I'm trying to stay strong but being this has all happened so fast as I'm sure it happened with you that it's hard at times to take a deep breath. And thank you for reminding me not to look online as I often find myself Googling things and quickly reminding myself that the doctor told me not to do that. Thank you for saying that you're all there for me and I hope that I can be there for a friend to all of you as well!

Forherself's picture
Forherself
Posts: 186
Joined: Jan 2019

It is very hard to hear what you have been through lately.  We all have different stories, but have many things in common.  I read in your comments something I felt strongly.  How do I deal with other peoples emotions about my cancer, when I need to deal with my own emtions and fears.  How do I answer their questions when I don't know myself.  It was very hard to deal with other people.  I still haven't told many people about my diagnosis.  And I didn't tell many for a long while.  One of my friends who went to a counsellor to deal with her own diagnosis told me she was advised to say 'I'm not having a good day today" when she felt unable to deal with other peoples questions and emitions.  It is a polite way of excusing yourself from a conversation you don't want.   As you gain knowledge about your plan of treatment you will feel not so alone.  There are lots of us out there.  

janaes
Posts: 760
Joined: May 2016

Feelingalone, im not sure how old your son is but my two kids had to deal with my cancer. I remember one of the days i was loosing my hair my 9 year old daughter (at the time) put a plastic bag over her head and prettended she was bald. It was so sweet. As time went on she would make up songs about me being bald and sing them in the house. That was a fun time. It helped us through the tough time. She goes to a cancer canp once a year for a week thats called camp keesam that is a camp found all around the USA. She loves it.  I dont know if any of this is helpful but i wanted to wish you the best. Cancer is not an easy thing. When i found out i had to do chemo i was mad and comming here for support really helped. Know that you can come here whenever you need to. 

Janae 

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Thank you Forherself on your advice to keep it simple on a not so good day and just say I'm not having a good day. 

Because I'm just finding out this week my prognosis I'm struggling with how to even tell my immediate family of my prognosis .

Finding friends in all of you I know will help me feel not so alone. 

 

Armywife's picture
Armywife
Posts: 294
Joined: Feb 2018

Dear FeelingAlone - you're not alone anymore!  Here we all are to help you, dear girl.  Most of us have been through surgery and chemo, so we can assure you that this is do-able.  I second MA's advice to ice those hands and feet during chemo infusions.  I am living proof that it works.  

Yes, losing your hair is an unpleasant prospect, but it's very very temporary.  I'm 1 1/2 years out, and my hair is down to my shoulders already!  I have to look at old photos to remember.  My favorite thing to wear around the house and for sleeping were soft cotton beanie caps.  I got mine from the cancer society catalog, and have at least 7 or 8 of them.  They'll keep your head warm and cozy.  I was able to get a good wig through my health insurance, and then I bought a couple more online when that first one started to wear out - I wore it every time I left the house, because I didn't want people to notice that I was sick.  I was so glad to have that wig, even through the hot Texas summer.  I will tell you that a warm shower feels absolutely amazing on a bald head.  It was definitely the silver lining to that cloud.  

I understand your concern about your son.  I was very surprised that it bothered my daughter so much that I didn't have hair - and she was 28!  I only see her a couple times a year, but she sure did not like seeing me without the wig.  I still have no idea why it mattered that much to her.  My husband was a champ about it.

If you lose your eyebrows, I recommend a soft brow powder applied with a stencil.  I got the stencil at Sephora and the brow powder compact (Cover Girl) at WalMart.  I was terrible at trying to use a brow pencil, and the powder was a great choice for me.  I still use it to fill in the sparse spots I have from getting older.  Eyebrows and lashes come back quickly, and you'll enjoy cheering your hair on as it comes in too!  

Best to you.  We are here for you.

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Armywife, thanks so much for all your suggestions stating and stating I'm not alone anymore! I feel blessed to be finding friendship with all of you. It's been helpful to chat with all of u that have experience the health journey I'm beginning. I will definitely look into the brow powder and stencil.

My son is22 and I know he would not want to see me without hair much like your 28 year old daughter. Unfortunately he has inherited his mother's anxiety and I know that that would just give him much stress  

How do you fit yourself for a wig? I was really hoping be proactive and to get one before I lost my hair. I haven't got a date yet for my first chemo appointment but I'm assuming it's going to be in just a short few weeks. I also haven't figured out how to tell him i have cancer.any suggestions on how you talked with your daughter. I think it's never easy telling your child serious news and being he's older I just worry that he will immediately think that I'm not going to live. I've been a single parent most of his life and he and I are really close and I know this is going to devastate him. He lives with me still fulltime and communities to college so we see each other every day. I know I have to be honest but I feel I have no answers myself ss I'm just beginning the process of being cancer free.

Best to u as well and all who are on this health journey. 

DebiR
Posts: 37
Joined: Jul 2014

I also did the standard chemo and lost my hair.  Like others it started falling out just before my second chemo.  I took a different approach and celebrated it since I knew I couldn't change it.  My hairdresser is a very small salon so I came when no one else was there with my mom, sister and some nieces and we had a little party with fancy cupcakes.  Yes, there were a few tears along the way, but I tried to make it a fun experience.

I got a wig from my cancer center that looked almost exactly like my own hair.  I wore it for work or anytime I didn't want everyone knowing what I was going through.  Otherwise I wore scarves.  Honestly, I loved not having to do my hair every day.  It saved so much time and was very liberating. I could just pop on a scarf or the wig and off I went. Cool

When my hair first started growing back it was very curly like many others have reported.  I remember looking at it and thinking OMG I have my dad's hair! LOL  When it got long enough I had it colored (I was 57 at the time and never saw my gray hair before ) and the texture was much better.  I then dropped the wig all together.  I loved the curly because I always had very fine straight hair but over time it did diminish.  I have to say my post chemo hair is much better than before even at almost 5 years out so that was my bonus.

Debi 

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

DebiR, I admire that you took a different approach to losing your hair and made it a celebration.  It shows your strength and courage. 

I'm also so happy for you that your almost 5 years out!

Its reassuring to hear that hair regrowth happens an d that it can look nicer than your original  hair.

Were u able to order the wig from your cancer center prior to loosing your hair?

Thank you for sharing 

God bless

DebiR
Posts: 37
Joined: Jul 2014

I just went there and they had tons of wigs for free to chose from.  I found one that looked so much like my own hair that no one even knew it was a wig.  Maybe I just got lucky, maybe it was meant to be.  I stopped there on my way to get my head shaved and wore that wig home. 

I went through chemo during the Ohio summer (it can get hot, probably not like the south, south west though) and it never bothered me.  I don't know what it was made of but it was light and airy.  I wore it though the winter too as my last chemo was end of October and have to share a funny/embarassing story.  I had to go to a workshop for work at Seven Spring Resort in PA in January.  I  didn't want to go as I was still feeling the effects of the chemo and not at my usual engery self but off I went.  I was in the meeting room and pulled off my scarf around my neck and off popped my wig.  Oh boy....I just quickly walked out of the room, put it back on and hoped no one saw me (most were busy talking).  The room was all men....no one mentioned anything.  HaHa.  

Debi

derMaus's picture
derMaus
Posts: 559
Joined: Nov 2016

Hi, Debi, thank you for posting. I see that you've been on the Board since 2014, which is quite an accomplishment. Would you consider posting a little bit about yourself on the About Me page? It doesn't have to be anything huge, it would just be very encouraging for people to see a long-term survivor such as yourself. Thank you again for posting !

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Thanks for sharing your lol mishap story debit. That'll probably happen to me. Ha ha.   Finding humor will get a us all threw this.

I'm going to my local cancer center this week where I will be treated so hopefully that have wings there or resources for me .

Quilter_1's picture
Quilter_1
Posts: 43
Joined: Mar 2019

OThe only person who saw me without my “hair“ was my sweet husband.  I didn’t want anyone to see me looking sick, either.  I always wore a hat in the house and would put my wig on if someone came.  It’s a personal choice.  I bought two wigs, had them cut by my hairdresse, they each looked very much like my own hair.  Most people were shocked that I was wearing a wig, they thought the type of chemo I received was the kind that didn’t cause hairloss.

As for as telling your son, you just have to do it.  We had a family meeting with our son, wife and 2 grandsons.  They handled it as well as you would expect.  After some crying and hugging, we just went on with it.  Your son will be there for you and you will be there for him.  At least, that’s how my family was.  You will figure out your way 

Linda

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

hi Linda yes you're right I'm just going to have to tell him but I'm so scared as he and I are so close. He also has high anxiety and stresses over even the little things so I can only imagine how this will effect him. 

I'm meeting with a social worker later this week so I'm hoping she can give me guidance.  Just so hard because I have so many uncertainties so I won't be able to answer much of his questions.  I have a few more tests to do b4 my treatment begins later this month. As much as I'm scared of treatment I just want it done.

Holding this all in has been hard for sure . In trying to wait until my son returns from his vacation to tell him as I want him to enjoy his time at the ocean.

Being a mom is really hard when u have to be brave.

Quilter_1's picture
Quilter_1
Posts: 43
Joined: Mar 2019

Sending you love, hugs and strength.

Linda

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Thanks so much quilter_1! 

Love, hugs , and strength to us s well!

 

Feelingalone74
Posts: 233
Joined: Jun 2019

Thank you so much to all u beautiful ladies who have reached out to me. Im grateful for u all.

Wishing u all good health and a Happy 4th of July!

Lulu7582's picture
Lulu7582
Posts: 112
Joined: Jun 2018

Just know you aren't alone and most of us on this board have been through chemo so it is doable.  Think of the chemo as your friend helping to kill any cancer cells that are lurking around. I know there is a lot of emotions and feelings that go along with this diagnosis so find what works for you...family, friends, counselor, pastor to help. Having a supportive and loving family and friends is so important in helping us to deal with the cancer. I remember initially when I was diagnosed I would feel like I had a big 'C' on me but now I am used to the idea that I am living with cancer and so thankful that we are in the 'golden age' of cancer care where new treatments are being discovered. 

Yes losing your hair, eyebrows and eyelashes isn't something I would wish on anyone but it is temporary and thank goodness the wigs available do make us look 'normal'. I know in my case I only wore the wig a couple of times and used my scarves instead. I had scarves in all different colors to match whatever I was wearing. 

So sending you love and hugs. Hang in there, take one day at a time and you also have a happy 4th! xo 

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