Side affects from Taxol & Carboplatin

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  • ocalalaurie
    ocalalaurie Member Posts: 34
    dfw2020 said:

    Taxol & Carboplatin Treatment
    Diagnosed with melanoma on my liver and a spleen. Pet scan showed spread to other part of my body and some bones. Start Taxol & Carboplatin treatment in two days. Insurance refuse to pay to pay for Yervoy (ipilimumab) treatment. Trying to find a Clinical Trials for ipilimumab because the drug shown to prolong the lives of people with stage 4 melanoma cancer.

    ....looking forward to your feedback

    hello
    hello, dfw2020. Just happened upon your post...you may want to repost in the "rare and other cancers" section of the discussion boards (melanoma is there I believe), as you may get a better response for help/feedback. I understand your plight....I'm always fighting insurance co for one reason or another. Frustrating :(
    Best to you,
    ocalalaurie
  • CoulterS
    CoulterS Member Posts: 1
    jazzy1 said:

    Peggy,
    Do you know that chemo is generally cumulative...meaning, side affects get more intense as more treatments are endured. I will vouch for that as exactly what happened to me, plus my blood count was down and last 3 chemo's ended up on neulasta shot (had 33 rounds pelvic radiation between chemo 3 and 4...lucky gal!)

    We all seem to make it thru the treatments, but yes there are times we wanna fold up and run. Just keep on pushing and know there's light at the end of the long tunnel!!

    Hugs,
    Jan

    Side effects from Taxol & Carboplatin
    Hi Jan,
    I am so glad to find these posts. I am 33 years old an went through treatment for Ovarian Cancer in 2008-2009. I am STILL on pain meds for the nerve pain in my legs! I had to quit my job at the board do education, and I did finally get disability, thankfully. I hope to connect with some of you for ongoing support!
    Blessings!
    Shonda Coulter
    Email: [email protected]
    I would love to hear your story!
  • jazzy1
    jazzy1 Member Posts: 1,379

    hello
    hello, dfw2020. Just happened upon your post...you may want to repost in the "rare and other cancers" section of the discussion boards (melanoma is there I believe), as you may get a better response for help/feedback. I understand your plight....I'm always fighting insurance co for one reason or another. Frustrating :(
    Best to you,
    ocalalaurie

    Update
    Thought I'd give an update on myself. Since completion of treatments July '09 and starting in Dec '09 with some "minor" lower back pain, finally got worse. Had my 6-month oncologist appt in July and approved an MRI. Results showed -- bulging disk in L5 area and compression of nerve root -- basically called sciatica. Everyone wants to send me off to the neurosurgeon, but surgery is last resort.

    Always been a believer in chiropractic and other alternative options, so starting with a new chiropractor who helped a friend with a similar back issue, but his disks were herniated. Figure I'll give her a shot as she has great experience, plus add in some other things such as acupuncture. One thing my chiropractor told me, after 30+ years of running, that really puts a strain on many joints...one being knees and lower back...bingo! Then add on external pelvic radiation, 33 rounds, and I'm even more jolted.

    Well as the docs keep telling me, YOU HAVE NO CANCER...BE HAPPY! Guess I should be happy, what's a little pain...hum???

    Best to all,
    Jan
  • Theodora_F
    Theodora_F Member Posts: 2
    gdpawel said:

    Peripheral Neuropathy
    There are three major groups of nerves in the human body.

    1. The peripheral nerves that carry information to and from the limbs.

    2. The nerves that supply the bowels and other internal organs.

    3. The nerves of the head which connect to the ears, eyes, taste buds, etc.

    Nerves in any or all of these major groups can be affected by certain chemotherapy drugs.

    Nerves are vulnerable to many kinds of damage. They can be damaged by certain cancers. This may be caused by the cancer cells producing a particular kind of biological agent that interferes with the function of the nerves.

    Sometimes, they can be damaged by drugs used in chemotherapy treatment. The chemotherapy drugs that most likely cause nerve damage are the vinca alkaloids, platinum drugs and the taxanes. These drugs have the potential of interfering with nerve function.

    You may notice symptoms in different areas of your body depending on which groups of nerves are affected.

    Symptoms in the hands and feet happen when peripheral nerve damage happens. The first sign of nerve damage is usually a feeling of tingling and numbness like what you experience when your foot goes to sleep after you've been sitting for a long time in an uncomfortable position.

    If the problem progresses further, it often produces weakness of the muscles, resulting in loss of strength at the wrist or the ankle. You will notice difficulty in doing up buttons and picking up coins. You may notice that you will tend to trip while walking up stairs or dragging your feet and tend to have a wide-based gait. In severe cases, the weakness may be so severe that you will need a wheelchair.

    When the nerves in the bowel are affected, constipation is the earliest sign. In a few people, the abdomen becomes bloated with a distended bowel that is basically paralyzed.

    Some of the nerves in the head can also be affected. Platinum drugs can affect the auditory nerve and cause loss of hearing and tinnitus(ringing in the ears). Vision can very occasionally be affected.

    A lot depends on how quickly your cancer treatment can be stopped. Sometimes the need for treatment is more urgent then the residual nerve damage. Sometimes, the balance between benefit from the drug and the side effect of nerve damage is more finely balanced.

    Once treatment has been stopped, recovery is usually slow. It may take months to get even partial improvement and often there will be some residual impairment, either a motor weakness or a sensory numbness or both. Recovery is slower in the feet and legs than in the hands and arms.

    There is no specific treatment that enhances nerve recovery. There are no drugs that will directly stimulate nerve regeneration or recovery. If you have severe and prolonged pain, then the pain may require narcotics often combined with antidepressants. In some cases, certain types of anticonvulsants would be helpful.

    Treatment options are subjects that you should discuss with your doctor, so you have accurate expectations of potential benefits and side effects.

    Chemotherapy drugs that can cause neuropathy. NCI lists these as most likely to do so:

    Cisplatinum (Platinol)
    Carboplatin (Paraplatin)
    Vincristine (Oncovin)
    Vinblastine (Velban)
    Etoposide/VP-16 (VePesid)
    Cytarabine (Cytosar, Ara-C)
    Hexamethylmelamine (Hexalen)
    Suramin
    Paclitaxel (Taxol) and Docetaxel (Taxotere)
    Other medications reported to contribute to neuropathy include oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), gemcitibine (Gemzar) and thalidomide (Thalomid).

    Side effects from Taxol & Carboplatin therapy
    Hi Greg,

    Thank you kindly for the more in-depth information, I hope your wife is well.

    After reading the forum I felt I wanted to share my experience in hope of offering a little help to others and of a possible feedback.

    So, on January this year I was diagnosed with pleural cancer (early stage)and undergone surgery and 6 rounds of chemotherapy with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in a 3 week cycle.
    I completed therapy in June and although I went through most of the symptoms other people described here,( like hair loss and severe muscle and joint pain,mild vision degradation,tingling in my hands and feet...)I kind of been having some higher expectations regarding my overall well-being after treatment. I had two post surgery intermediate CT scans so far, and thank God, I was told everything looks fine and clean, which gave me a fantastic psychological boost.
    For the last two weeks or so though, the muscle and joint pain intensified, matching or even surpassing the pain I had during the chemo treatment. I noticed the pain seems to be more severe during the weather changes and after prolonged rest periods, especially on my right arm. On occasion, I feel a burning sensation inside where part of my pleura was removed.My oncologist prescribed pain killers and lots of patience.
    So all this cancelled out my initial euphoria and fear I may give in to desperation again.I use to be a very active and self reliant person and what drives me crazy to the brink of tears now is the fact that I need assistance even for the simplest things...
    So far, thinking that my body took a terrible beating from all those drugs they put into my system, I refrained from taking any more medicine. I learned, reading the forum, that B6 and Magnesium alleviates pain and I am willing to try them out.
    What I would like to know is how long this ordeal is going to last, at least in a relative time frame.
    Seems like doctors are not so keen in letting out this kind of information. Maybe this approach works for some people who prefer to take things as they come. I, for one, fall into the other category.
    That's about it for now.
    Thank you for reading this, wish you all a quick and lasting recovery.

    Theo
  • cathyp
    cathyp Member Posts: 373

    Side effects from Taxol & Carboplatin therapy
    Hi Greg,

    Thank you kindly for the more in-depth information, I hope your wife is well.

    After reading the forum I felt I wanted to share my experience in hope of offering a little help to others and of a possible feedback.

    So, on January this year I was diagnosed with pleural cancer (early stage)and undergone surgery and 6 rounds of chemotherapy with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in a 3 week cycle.
    I completed therapy in June and although I went through most of the symptoms other people described here,( like hair loss and severe muscle and joint pain,mild vision degradation,tingling in my hands and feet...)I kind of been having some higher expectations regarding my overall well-being after treatment. I had two post surgery intermediate CT scans so far, and thank God, I was told everything looks fine and clean, which gave me a fantastic psychological boost.
    For the last two weeks or so though, the muscle and joint pain intensified, matching or even surpassing the pain I had during the chemo treatment. I noticed the pain seems to be more severe during the weather changes and after prolonged rest periods, especially on my right arm. On occasion, I feel a burning sensation inside where part of my pleura was removed.My oncologist prescribed pain killers and lots of patience.
    So all this cancelled out my initial euphoria and fear I may give in to desperation again.I use to be a very active and self reliant person and what drives me crazy to the brink of tears now is the fact that I need assistance even for the simplest things...
    So far, thinking that my body took a terrible beating from all those drugs they put into my system, I refrained from taking any more medicine. I learned, reading the forum, that B6 and Magnesium alleviates pain and I am willing to try them out.
    What I would like to know is how long this ordeal is going to last, at least in a relative time frame.
    Seems like doctors are not so keen in letting out this kind of information. Maybe this approach works for some people who prefer to take things as they come. I, for one, fall into the other category.
    That's about it for now.
    Thank you for reading this, wish you all a quick and lasting recovery.

    Theo

    Just wanted to say good luck
    Just wanted to say good luck Theo, you have been through a lot. I know we are anxious to return to normal ASAP, but sadly, it takes time and our normal may be differnet post cancer and treatments.
    Also, we can relate to that desperation feeling all to well too. Sometimesevery little ache, pain, twinge can send is there again. Hang in there, hopefully you will notice gradual improvements as the day go on. Wishing you a speedy recovery
  • Theodora_F
    Theodora_F Member Posts: 2
    cathyp said:

    Just wanted to say good luck
    Just wanted to say good luck Theo, you have been through a lot. I know we are anxious to return to normal ASAP, but sadly, it takes time and our normal may be differnet post cancer and treatments.
    Also, we can relate to that desperation feeling all to well too. Sometimesevery little ache, pain, twinge can send is there again. Hang in there, hopefully you will notice gradual improvements as the day go on. Wishing you a speedy recovery

    Hello Cathy,
    Thank you so

    Hello Cathy,

    Thank you so much for your kind words and encouragement.
    I am significantly better now,the pain has been reduced to a much lower and bearable level which allows me to move my right arm relatively well. During my few days of excruciating pain I was recommended as painkillers a combination of 'CLORZOXAZON' and 'VOLTAREN ****' which really worked for me. I have been taking also, as daily supplements, vitamin B6,Magnesium and Zinc...so I am gradually trying to get back to normal and hope for the best.

    Best wishes for all
  • halilgagli
    halilgagli Member Posts: 1
    jazzy1 said:

    Update
    Thought I'd give an update on myself. Since completion of treatments July '09 and starting in Dec '09 with some "minor" lower back pain, finally got worse. Had my 6-month oncologist appt in July and approved an MRI. Results showed -- bulging disk in L5 area and compression of nerve root -- basically called sciatica. Everyone wants to send me off to the neurosurgeon, but surgery is last resort.

    Always been a believer in chiropractic and other alternative options, so starting with a new chiropractor who helped a friend with a similar back issue, but his disks were herniated. Figure I'll give her a shot as she has great experience, plus add in some other things such as acupuncture. One thing my chiropractor told me, after 30+ years of running, that really puts a strain on many joints...one being knees and lower back...bingo! Then add on external pelvic radiation, 33 rounds, and I'm even more jolted.

    Well as the docs keep telling me, YOU HAVE NO CANCER...BE HAPPY! Guess I should be happy, what's a little pain...hum???

    Best to all,
    Jan

    Is this discussion closed?

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  • Kehylar
    Kehylar Member Posts: 8
    jazzy1 said:

    Update
    Thought I'd give an update on myself. Since completion of treatments July '09 and starting in Dec '09 with some "minor" lower back pain, finally got worse. Had my 6-month oncologist appt in July and approved an MRI. Results showed -- bulging disk in L5 area and compression of nerve root -- basically called sciatica. Everyone wants to send me off to the neurosurgeon, but surgery is last resort.

    Always been a believer in chiropractic and other alternative options, so starting with a new chiropractor who helped a friend with a similar back issue, but his disks were herniated. Figure I'll give her a shot as she has great experience, plus add in some other things such as acupuncture. One thing my chiropractor told me, after 30+ years of running, that really puts a strain on many joints...one being knees and lower back...bingo! Then add on external pelvic radiation, 33 rounds, and I'm even more jolted.

    Well as the docs keep telling me, YOU HAVE NO CANCER...BE HAPPY! Guess I should be happy, what's a little pain...hum???

    Best to all,
    Jan

    I just was diagnosed with Stage IIIC uterine cancer, was presumed Stage 1A and then darned if one of the few lymph nodes my doctor removed from the para-aortic area didn't come up positive! This is the chemo combo they are planning to put me on, and I'm just really concerned about the effects, it seems pretty heavy duty considering I really have no other evidence of disease other than the microscopic cells found in one lymph node. I know they want to treat it aggressively to not anything else out, but just wondering if there are other options I should consider? I'm curious as well as to the comment about taking stuff to prevent neuropathy. I already have fibromyalgia and chronic pain issues so I'm terrified of dealing with more pain on a daily basis, when I already have to take pain meds to keep things in check. But I'm only 45 so certainly don't want to have the cancer go any further either when I have lots of good years ahead of me still!
  • pattimcf
    pattimcf Member Posts: 2
    taxol

    I have had neuropathy since receiving taxol and cis-platinum for bladder cancer in 1997.

    It has slowly gotten worse through the years.

    Anybody else out there from before 2000?

  • pattimcf
    pattimcf Member Posts: 2
    taxol

    Yes, I have long term affects from taxol.

    Neuropathy slowly progressing since 1997.  

    Anybody else out there that long?

  • Hondo
    Hondo Member Posts: 6,636 Member
    Hi Pattimcf

     

    Wow you have been fighting this from 1997, you must be one strong person. My first NPC was in 2002, then it came back in 2004, I did more radiation and chemo. But is came back again in 2006, the doctors only gave me 6 months to maybe a year at best if I do more Chemo, but my caretaker and I said No to anymore Chemo. But by God’s blessing I am still here 10 years later. I would love to hear your story.

     

    Tim

     

  • barbiesusie18
    barbiesusie18 Member Posts: 2
    pattimcf said:

    taxol

    Yes, I have long term affects from taxol.

    Neuropathy slowly progressing since 1997.  

    Anybody else out there that long?

    I have long term side effects

    I have long term side effects from my chemo treatments in 2005, which resulted in peripheral neurophathy in both my hands and feet that is now moving up my arms and legs. The biggest frustration I have is the lack of general information with doctors and nurses in regard to this. I find more help and new information online, just found information on part of a study done for falling in women age 62 and older. It helped me understand why I have been landing on the floor so offen and why I walk funny (apparently for people with CIPN their gait changes, becomes wider compensating for instability).

  • eclc
    eclc Member Posts: 18
    edited July 2016 #34
    19 years later....

    At 34 years old, I was diagnosed with NSCLC Stage IIA.  I underwent a right open lung biopsy (thoracotomy) followed (2 months later) with a right pnuemonectomy (lung removal).  Two months after that I started Taxol/Carboplatin and Radiation adjuvant treatment through clinical trial RTOG 9705...it knocked the absolute snot out of me...but I survived.  19 years later I've got the nueropathy that you all have talked about, a case of 'chemo-brain' that has never really gone away, a sensitivity to cold in my hands where holding an ice cold can of soda is painful, Congestive Heart Failure from the chemo/radiation and finally...as of last week...esophageal cancer!

    When we put ourselves through this horrendous treatment regimen, our focus is that 'five year survival number'.  Once we get past that, the oncologists seem to stop caring...hey we're cured right?  Fast forward another decade and serious side effects begin to manifest.  I'm now in a situation where Johns Hopkins is trying to figure out how to perform surgery on my for my new diagnosis but having had my chest cavity violated twice and then radiated leaves me in a bit of a bind.

    NOW...let me qualify my previous statement.  YES, I've got a lot of problems from the treatment path I took 19 years ago and am suffering with my decisions to this very day...maybe a better way to say it would be that I'm LIVING with my decision.  Had I not  done what I did, I would have never gotten to be my Son's Best Man in his wedding or walked my daughter down the aisle.  In retropect, I made the right decision.

  • MichaelG
    MichaelG Member Posts: 2
    fear and knowledge

    I underwent a right lung pnemonectomy in early 2014. I decided to take the post op chemo. I knew it would statistically increase my odds to avoid a  re-occurence by only 7-10%. I rationalized that 10% is a 100% if you fall into that category. Sharpe .. Huhhh.

    I was in an elevated state of euphoria that I had survived the operation. I was relatively cancer free at the moment . I was  quite flippant in my decision   that the Chemo would not be a problem and I wanted it. I have some pretty severe long term side effects. Awww... nice to be in a position to use the words "Long Term" when referencing to ones self. I just don't think I would subject myself to the Carbo / Taxo coctails if given a re-do. I can't really say it was a right or wrong decision but do think I should have been more forcefully forewarned about the almost certain side effects of the drugs.

    I'm still in a state of euphoria over my continuing " Good Luck". I have always been a lucky guy and remain so today. Is life sweet or what .

    Final anaylisis ... Carbo/ Taxohol sux but Hey .... Ain't Life Grand :  ))

     

     

     

     

  • vitoriah huang
    vitoriah huang Member Posts: 6
    gdpawel said:

    Peripheral Neuropathy
    There are three major groups of nerves in the human body.

    1. The peripheral nerves that carry information to and from the limbs.

    2. The nerves that supply the bowels and other internal organs.

    3. The nerves of the head which connect to the ears, eyes, taste buds, etc.

    Nerves in any or all of these major groups can be affected by certain chemotherapy drugs.

    Nerves are vulnerable to many kinds of damage. They can be damaged by certain cancers. This may be caused by the cancer cells producing a particular kind of biological agent that interferes with the function of the nerves.

    Sometimes, they can be damaged by drugs used in chemotherapy treatment. The chemotherapy drugs that most likely cause nerve damage are the vinca alkaloids, platinum drugs and the taxanes. These drugs have the potential of interfering with nerve function.

    You may notice symptoms in different areas of your body depending on which groups of nerves are affected.

    Symptoms in the hands and feet happen when peripheral nerve damage happens. The first sign of nerve damage is usually a feeling of tingling and numbness like what you experience when your foot goes to sleep after you've been sitting for a long time in an uncomfortable position.

    If the problem progresses further, it often produces weakness of the muscles, resulting in loss of strength at the wrist or the ankle. You will notice difficulty in doing up buttons and picking up coins. You may notice that you will tend to trip while walking up stairs or dragging your feet and tend to have a wide-based gait. In severe cases, the weakness may be so severe that you will need a wheelchair.

    When the nerves in the bowel are affected, constipation is the earliest sign. In a few people, the abdomen becomes bloated with a distended bowel that is basically paralyzed.

    Some of the nerves in the head can also be affected. Platinum drugs can affect the auditory nerve and cause loss of hearing and tinnitus(ringing in the ears). Vision can very occasionally be affected.

    A lot depends on how quickly your cancer treatment can be stopped. Sometimes the need for treatment is more urgent then the residual nerve damage. Sometimes, the balance between benefit from the drug and the side effect of nerve damage is more finely balanced.

    Once treatment has been stopped, recovery is usually slow. It may take months to get even partial improvement and often there will be some residual impairment, either a motor weakness or a sensory numbness or both. Recovery is slower in the feet and legs than in the hands and arms.

    There is no specific treatment that enhances nerve recovery. There are no drugs that will directly stimulate nerve regeneration or recovery. If you have severe and prolonged pain, then the pain may require narcotics often combined with antidepressants. In some cases, certain types of anticonvulsants would be helpful.

    Treatment options are subjects that you should discuss with your doctor, so you have accurate expectations of potential benefits and side effects.

    Chemotherapy drugs that can cause neuropathy. NCI lists these as most likely to do so:

    Cisplatinum (Platinol)
    Carboplatin (Paraplatin)
    Vincristine (Oncovin)
    Vinblastine (Velban)
    Etoposide/VP-16 (VePesid)
    Cytarabine (Cytosar, Ara-C)
    Hexamethylmelamine (Hexalen)
    Suramin
    Paclitaxel (Taxol) and Docetaxel (Taxotere)
    Other medications reported to contribute to neuropathy include oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), gemcitibine (Gemzar) and thalidomide (Thalomid).

    neuropathy

    yeah, i have neuropathy my arms still painfull i drink a lot water with turmeric; it get better whilw you are drinking every time. And i am doing physical therapy everyday fitght the numbness, burning and sometimes needles my feet and other arms.

  • cplemmons
    cplemmons Member Posts: 1
    Memory Loss

    Has anyone experienced memory loss as a side effect? I went through 6 rounds of chemo 9 years ago and my memory seems to be getting worse. I don't know if it's age. I'm 41. But have still have the numbness in my legs/feet. Dr.'s don't seem concerned about it. I am currently on depression meds as well. It is effecting my work. I would like to have some help. Thank you in advance.