Lemonade?

Buckwirth
Buckwirth Member Posts: 1,258 Member
edited April 2011 in Colorectal Cancer #1
«1

Comments

  • pepebcn
    pepebcn Member Posts: 6,331 Member
    Lemon, strawberry,asparagus , what else?
    I eat tons of both in my life !
    Take care !
  • pepebcn said:

    Lemon, strawberry,asparagus , what else?
    I eat tons of both in my life !
    Take care !

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • thxmiker
    thxmiker Member Posts: 1,278 Member
    I love citrus fruits and
    I love citrus fruits and live where they grow like weeds. (NW of Los Angeles) We also eat various citrus fruits all year long in abundance, and yet I still had cancer.

    I could not stomach citrus fruits when I was on chemo at all. A small sweet variety tangerine I could stomach. (Cuties or Tangeolos) A half of a glass of citrus juice and I was running to the toilet. Now that Chemo is over I am eating oranges and even had a glass of Grapefruit juice. I have not dared to eat a lemon yet. (I love the miller lemons.)

    Best Always, mike
  • SisterSledge
    SisterSledge Member Posts: 332
    Different strokes for different folks
    One thing to keep in mind, since we all react to individually to things...the reaction one person has to a treatment may be entirely different than another will experience. To me, it makes sense to try things on your body that seem likely to be helpful and non-harmful even if there is not consensus on the efficacy...it might work for me :)
  • Buckwirth
    Buckwirth Member Posts: 1,258 Member

    Different strokes for different folks
    One thing to keep in mind, since we all react to individually to things...the reaction one person has to a treatment may be entirely different than another will experience. To me, it makes sense to try things on your body that seem likely to be helpful and non-harmful even if there is not consensus on the efficacy...it might work for me :)

    Charles Huggins
    Was a young Urological surgeon at University of Chicago in the late 1920's. Having no real experience with operating on bladders, kidneys, genitals or the prostate, he was having difficulty finding patients, so he set up a lab to study prostatic fluid, which he extracted from the prostates of dogs.

    He noticed that if the dog was fixed, the prostrate was shriveled, but that if he injected the animal with testosterone it revived to its full glory.

    Many of the dogs came to him with cancer of the prostate (something that only happens in humans, dogs and lions) and initially, since all he wanted was the fluid, he thought these useless. However, he tried castrating one of the animals he found that the cancer shriveled with the prostate!

    In the 1890's George Beatson had noticed something similar with breast cancer (it was actually something he garnered listening to the local dairy farmers discussing their cattle, he just decided to see if his human patients reacted the same way). If the uterus is removed almost 2/3rds of the time the cancer dies. Of course at this time no one knew what estrogen was, and the experiment was quickly forgotten.

    Turns out there are at least two kinds of breast cancer, ER positive and ER negative (ER stands for Estrogen Receptor) that is why it did not work for all the patients. In 1962 a patent was filed in England for what was supposed to have been a birth control pill, however, instead of the intended effect of enhancing Estrogen, it stopped it cold, and was considered of no use as a drug, until its creators remembered the bit about ER Positive tumors and wondered if it could be used in the fight against cancer... Thus was born Tamoxifen, the first drug to target a specific pathway in the tumor itself rather than a general cellular poison that destroyed indiscriminately.

    So yes, you are correct that there are differences. Even those who seemingly have the same cancer, in the same location can have differences, and what works for one may not work for another.
  • Kathryn_in_MN
    Kathryn_in_MN Member Posts: 1,252
    Have always loved citrus
    My mother was amazed that I loved lemons as a baby. All my life I have eaten a lot of lemons, limes, and grapefruit. Unfortunately I still got colon cancer. I stopped eating red meat at age 17. I had a huge organic garden and froze and canned most of what we ate out of season. Non-smoker. Never overweight. Moderate to heavy exercise all my life.

    I don't think citrus can hurt at all. And I still have as much as I can tolerate. But I don't think it can be a cure for me. Might work for someone else though. We all react differently.
  • Buckwirth
    Buckwirth Member Posts: 1,258 Member
    "However, the best that can
    "However, the best that can be said at this point is that citrus fruits may potentially harbor anti-cancer properties that could help ward off cancer. No reputable scientific or medical studies have reported that lemons have been found to be a "proven remedy against cancers of all types," nor has any of the (conveniently unnamed) "world's largest drug manufacturers" reported discovering that lemons are "10,000 times stronger than chemotherapy" and that their ingestion can "destroy malignant [cancer] cells." All of those claims are hyperbole and exaggeration not supported by facts. "
  • thxmiker said:

    I love citrus fruits and
    I love citrus fruits and live where they grow like weeds. (NW of Los Angeles) We also eat various citrus fruits all year long in abundance, and yet I still had cancer.

    I could not stomach citrus fruits when I was on chemo at all. A small sweet variety tangerine I could stomach. (Cuties or Tangeolos) A half of a glass of citrus juice and I was running to the toilet. Now that Chemo is over I am eating oranges and even had a glass of Grapefruit juice. I have not dared to eat a lemon yet. (I love the miller lemons.)

    Best Always, mike

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • thxmiker
    thxmiker Member Posts: 1,278 Member
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    Miller Lemon
    Miller Lemons have thick skins similar to a grapefruit and the are the size of an orange. They have a really bright yellow skin and are much sweeter and have larger pulp then normal lemons. Millers are a popular citrus tree in SoCal for a private yard. There are some commercially grown, but a small percentage of the overall commercial lemon crop.

    Best Always, mike
  • PGLGreg
    PGLGreg Member Posts: 731
    zest
    The first part of the article (as far as I read) attributes anticancer activity to lemonene, which it says is in lemon zest. Unless you make lemonade in an unusual way, that doesn't imply that lemonade would be helpful in fighting cancer.

    --Greg
  • Buckwirth
    Buckwirth Member Posts: 1,258 Member
    PGLGreg said:

    zest
    The first part of the article (as far as I read) attributes anticancer activity to lemonene, which it says is in lemon zest. Unless you make lemonade in an unusual way, that doesn't imply that lemonade would be helpful in fighting cancer.

    --Greg

    ?
    The title is a play on words, nothing more.
  • Buckwirth said:

    ?
    The title is a play on words, nothing more.

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • pete43lost_at_sea
    pete43lost_at_sea Member Posts: 3,900
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    thanks blake and graci
    i'll add some lemon to my jiucing when i get home.
    i was advised to have a lemon jiuce every morning by naturopath #3 but never rely got into it.
    its tasty and does not hurt and my father in law has a lemon tree.

    hugs,
    pete
  • lselasco
    lselasco Member Posts: 5
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    lemons
    Hi Gracie,
    I think they're Meyer Lemons, they grow out here in California. Really nice, not as bitter/sharp tasting as regular lemon.

    http://meyerlemontree.com/
  • PGLGreg
    PGLGreg Member Posts: 731
    PGLGreg said:

    zest
    The first part of the article (as far as I read) attributes anticancer activity to lemonene, which it says is in lemon zest. Unless you make lemonade in an unusual way, that doesn't imply that lemonade would be helpful in fighting cancer.

    --Greg

    limonene
    Sorry, I should have written "limonene" for the agent in lemon zest said to be therapeutic.
  • Buckwirth
    Buckwirth Member Posts: 1,258 Member
    PGLGreg said:

    limonene
    Sorry, I should have written "limonene" for the agent in lemon zest said to be therapeutic.

    Sir,
    Given the day, I think you can consider yourself forgiven.

    :)

    Hopefully you are having a happy Easter. Though the weather is nice here in So Cal, it would be nice to be there in Hawaii!

    Blake
  • Buckwirth said:

    Sir,
    Given the day, I think you can consider yourself forgiven.

    :)

    Hopefully you are having a happy Easter. Though the weather is nice here in So Cal, it would be nice to be there in Hawaii!

    Blake

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • Yaziza
    Yaziza Member Posts: 14
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    Why are you all wanting to put sugar in the lemon juice
    Doesn't that defeat the purpose. Cancer LOVES Sugar. Stevia is a better choice.
  • AnneCan
    AnneCan Member Posts: 3,673
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    40ml
    1 cup = 250 ml, so 4o ml is a very small amount. 1Tbsp = 15 ml and a tsp = 5 mL.
  • John23
    John23 Member Posts: 2,122 Member
    Buckwirth said:

    Charles Huggins
    Was a young Urological surgeon at University of Chicago in the late 1920's. Having no real experience with operating on bladders, kidneys, genitals or the prostate, he was having difficulty finding patients, so he set up a lab to study prostatic fluid, which he extracted from the prostates of dogs.

    He noticed that if the dog was fixed, the prostrate was shriveled, but that if he injected the animal with testosterone it revived to its full glory.

    Many of the dogs came to him with cancer of the prostate (something that only happens in humans, dogs and lions) and initially, since all he wanted was the fluid, he thought these useless. However, he tried castrating one of the animals he found that the cancer shriveled with the prostate!

    In the 1890's George Beatson had noticed something similar with breast cancer (it was actually something he garnered listening to the local dairy farmers discussing their cattle, he just decided to see if his human patients reacted the same way). If the uterus is removed almost 2/3rds of the time the cancer dies. Of course at this time no one knew what estrogen was, and the experiment was quickly forgotten.

    Turns out there are at least two kinds of breast cancer, ER positive and ER negative (ER stands for Estrogen Receptor) that is why it did not work for all the patients. In 1962 a patent was filed in England for what was supposed to have been a birth control pill, however, instead of the intended effect of enhancing Estrogen, it stopped it cold, and was considered of no use as a drug, until its creators remembered the bit about ER Positive tumors and wondered if it could be used in the fight against cancer... Thus was born Tamoxifen, the first drug to target a specific pathway in the tumor itself rather than a general cellular poison that destroyed indiscriminately.

    So yes, you are correct that there are differences. Even those who seemingly have the same cancer, in the same location can have differences, and what works for one may not work for another.

    Tamoxifen

    Re:
    "the first drug to target a specific pathway in the tumor itself
    rather than a general cellular poison that destroyed indiscriminately. "


    More research would have indicated otherwise. Tamoxifen is apparently
    unable to "target a specific pathway", but rather it "blocks the effects of
    the estrogen hormone in the body."


    Tamoxifen isn't without it's cautions and hazards, since it can't
    isolate (target) cancer cells specifically. It can cause indiscriminate
    damage to our body, just as any other toxic chemical can!

    It should also be noted, that Tamoxifen is a known carcinogenic,
    and is responsible for many "second cancers", or cancers that
    are not related to the initial dx.

    Here's some easy reading about Tamoxifen from the Mayonnaise Clinic

    Be well; stay well.

    John