Cancer: The emperor of Maladies

Footstomper
Footstomper Member Posts: 1,237 Member
edited April 2015 in Kidney Cancer #1

Anyone else watching this? Hopeful and inspiring on the scientific effort and progress on dealing with this curse.

Comments

  • jason.2835
    jason.2835 Member Posts: 337 Member
    I'm waiting

    Stomper,

    I have been anticipating it greatly, but I'll watch it when it becomes available on streaming so I can watch it at my own pace.  It looks like there's a lot of information in that one.  Looks very good.

    - Jay

  • Srashedb
    Srashedb Member Posts: 482 Member
    Yes

    we watched part one last night and will catch part 2 in the next hour (PDT). What stood out for me was that all of the treatments took place in the last 100 years.

    it makes cure for cancer much more realistic; before watching it, the treatments seemed stalled.

    Sarah

  • sblairc
    sblairc Member Posts: 585 Member
    I really want to, but I can't. Scanxiety

    Hubs scans are in 3 weeks, I'm a mess. I want to watch it really bad, but it's just too much. I've been missing on the boards too, just so anxious. 

  • Darron
    Darron Member Posts: 310 Member
    watching

    I am watching it. I am anxious for part III.

  • APny
    APny Member Posts: 1,995 Member
    Darron said:

    watching

    I am watching it. I am anxious for part III.

    Tivo-ing it and will watch it

    Tivo-ing it and will watch it once we have all three parts.

  • NewDay
    NewDay Member Posts: 272
    APny said:

    Tivo-ing it and will watch it

    Tivo-ing it and will watch it once we have all three parts.

    Hard to watch

    i watched the first one.  I found it VERY interesting about the history of cancer treatment, but found it VERY hard to watch.  I did not realize that all of the early development of chemo was done by experimenting on children, injecting them with anything and everything.  I wish I had split up my viewing instead of watching all at once.

    i recorded the second one and will watch it today.  I hope it isn't so depressing.

  • Footstomper
    Footstomper Member Posts: 1,237 Member
    NewDay said:

    Hard to watch

    i watched the first one.  I found it VERY interesting about the history of cancer treatment, but found it VERY hard to watch.  I did not realize that all of the early development of chemo was done by experimenting on children, injecting them with anything and everything.  I wish I had split up my viewing instead of watching all at once.

    i recorded the second one and will watch it today.  I hope it isn't so depressing.

    Hard to watch

    Yes it is but I find it also incredibly hopeful. Maybe because my wife workd in the field (AIDS related Cancers) we're innured to the personal tragedy of the individual stories. I found it profoundly moving and as I said hopeful.

  • Srashedb
    Srashedb Member Posts: 482 Member

    Hard to watch

    Yes it is but I find it also incredibly hopeful. Maybe because my wife workd in the field (AIDS related Cancers) we're innured to the personal tragedy of the individual stories. I found it profoundly moving and as I said hopeful.

    Inspiring indeed

    last night's show was particularly inspiring to me with Nurse Wilson's story; I had breast cancer 23 years ago and although I am fine, I have lost many friends who had a more aggressive breast cancer.

    last night was riveting and my opinion (for what it's worth) is that after my husband getting his diagnosis in 2013, not much upsets me about cancer.

    Sarah

  • donna_lee
    donna_lee Member Posts: 1,041 Member

    Hard to watch

    Yes it is but I find it also incredibly hopeful. Maybe because my wife workd in the field (AIDS related Cancers) we're innured to the personal tragedy of the individual stories. I found it profoundly moving and as I said hopeful.

    Glad someone else is watching, too

    Hard, cruel, unrelenting and in your face.  I usually end up heading to bed after an hour and a half.  My husband has watched the first two, and it has brought up some good discussion.

    For the kidney cancer people, as Dickens wrote, ..."the best of times and the worst of times."  The cancer is being diagnosed at an earlier date, but usually by accident.  Surgical technique has advanced, with more organ sparing and lap surgeries.  Drugs have gone beyond IL2 and Sutent, the only things available in 2006.  

    It was truly difficult to listen to a supervising physician at OHSU and hear him say there was no drug we can give you.  What was in trial that year, had to have an active site they could monitor.  And since I had just had a kidney, set of nodes, half a liver and my gall bladder removed, I wasn't willing to grow a cancer just for him.  And luckily, the two recurrences in the next two years could be surgically removed-lymphadenectomies.

    Some of the information and stories told were part of my upbringing.  I was 9...and shhhh, grandma had cancer.  For shame...her own daughter didn't come to visit or to the funeral; but low and behold, my aunt also had cancer with mets to the brain and she didn't want to see what she might go thru the following year.

    I went off to university with a minor in health ed.  Spring term 1964, Dr. Anderson's Community Health Problems class...the lecture for the day was set aside to discuss the morning's breaking news that cigarette smoking was definitely linked to lung cancer.  Part of the start of the health education movement to prevent known disease.

    There have been trials and errors. Wrong theories, and sometimes flawed reasoning.  What is important to all of us is that researchers, Doctors and fund raisers have been trying.  It's gotten us to where we are today.  And for that, I say Thank You to everyone who has gone before me. 

    And to Cancer-don't call me, again, ever-never.

    To all of us, happy healing, enjoy April Fools Day, and have another birthday.

    Love, Donna

  • JoanneNH
    JoanneNH Member Posts: 115
    Srashedb said:

    Inspiring indeed

    last night's show was particularly inspiring to me with Nurse Wilson's story; I had breast cancer 23 years ago and although I am fine, I have lost many friends who had a more aggressive breast cancer.

    last night was riveting and my opinion (for what it's worth) is that after my husband getting his diagnosis in 2013, not much upsets me about cancer.

    Sarah

    "Nurse Wilson"

    Lori Wilson is actually Lori Wilson, MD, a cancer surgeon at Howard University.

  • NewDay
    NewDay Member Posts: 272
    donna_lee said:

    Glad someone else is watching, too

    Hard, cruel, unrelenting and in your face.  I usually end up heading to bed after an hour and a half.  My husband has watched the first two, and it has brought up some good discussion.

    For the kidney cancer people, as Dickens wrote, ..."the best of times and the worst of times."  The cancer is being diagnosed at an earlier date, but usually by accident.  Surgical technique has advanced, with more organ sparing and lap surgeries.  Drugs have gone beyond IL2 and Sutent, the only things available in 2006.  

    It was truly difficult to listen to a supervising physician at OHSU and hear him say there was no drug we can give you.  What was in trial that year, had to have an active site they could monitor.  And since I had just had a kidney, set of nodes, half a liver and my gall bladder removed, I wasn't willing to grow a cancer just for him.  And luckily, the two recurrences in the next two years could be surgically removed-lymphadenectomies.

    Some of the information and stories told were part of my upbringing.  I was 9...and shhhh, grandma had cancer.  For shame...her own daughter didn't come to visit or to the funeral; but low and behold, my aunt also had cancer with mets to the brain and she didn't want to see what she might go thru the following year.

    I went off to university with a minor in health ed.  Spring term 1964, Dr. Anderson's Community Health Problems class...the lecture for the day was set aside to discuss the morning's breaking news that cigarette smoking was definitely linked to lung cancer.  Part of the start of the health education movement to prevent known disease.

    There have been trials and errors. Wrong theories, and sometimes flawed reasoning.  What is important to all of us is that researchers, Doctors and fund raisers have been trying.  It's gotten us to where we are today.  And for that, I say Thank You to everyone who has gone before me. 

    And to Cancer-don't call me, again, ever-never.

    To all of us, happy healing, enjoy April Fools Day, and have another birthday.

    Love, Donna

    Episode #2 exciting

    i had written that episode #1 was depressing, but I just watched episode #2 and it was exciting.  I can't wait to see tonight's.

  • Srashedb
    Srashedb Member Posts: 482 Member
    JoanneNH said:

    "Nurse Wilson"

    Lori Wilson is actually Lori Wilson, MD, a cancer surgeon at Howard University.

    Yup

    Joanne:

    my bad; she was a surgeon, not a nurse.

    Sarah

     

  • Srashedb
    Srashedb Member Posts: 482 Member
    JoanneNH said:

    "Nurse Wilson"

    Lori Wilson is actually Lori Wilson, MD, a cancer surgeon at Howard University.

    Yup

    Joanne:

    my bad; she was a surgeon, not a nurse.

    Sarah

     

  • thaxter
    thaxter Member Posts: 124
    NewDay said:

    Episode #2 exciting

    i had written that episode #1 was depressing, but I just watched episode #2 and it was exciting.  I can't wait to see tonight's.

    In the six hour documentary

    In the six hour documentary they don't get to immunotherapy until 5 1/2 hours in. The only mention of kidney cancer is in that segment where they say that immunotherapy works best with melanoma and rcc. They highlight ipi but no mention of PD-1 drugs. Still I learned a lot, but also learned that every time it seems a breakthrough is made, there's a disappointment that follows

  • jason.2835
    jason.2835 Member Posts: 337 Member
    thaxter said:

    In the six hour documentary

    In the six hour documentary they don't get to immunotherapy until 5 1/2 hours in. The only mention of kidney cancer is in that segment where they say that immunotherapy works best with melanoma and rcc. They highlight ipi but no mention of PD-1 drugs. Still I learned a lot, but also learned that every time it seems a breakthrough is made, there's a disappointment that follows

    Agree

    Thax,

    I agree so far it's kind of a bummer... I've been watching on the PBS app on my Apple TV, and only halfway through the 2nd episode.  It does seem to have many of those moments where there is a "breakthrough," only to have the cancer come back.  I still believe the focus needs to be more on early detection of cancer rather than fighting it after the horses are gone.  I know that's not appropriate in all cancers, but when you're battling different characteristics in every patient, it's hard to have one "Magic Bullet" that will work for all cancers.  

    I am sick of being called "lucky."  There needs to be a focus on TESTING so that early detecting gives the patient a better chance of long-term survival.  Luck shouldn't have anything to do with it!

    - Jay 

  • Footstomper
    Footstomper Member Posts: 1,237 Member

    Agree

    Thax,

    I agree so far it's kind of a bummer... I've been watching on the PBS app on my Apple TV, and only halfway through the 2nd episode.  It does seem to have many of those moments where there is a "breakthrough," only to have the cancer come back.  I still believe the focus needs to be more on early detection of cancer rather than fighting it after the horses are gone.  I know that's not appropriate in all cancers, but when you're battling different characteristics in every patient, it's hard to have one "Magic Bullet" that will work for all cancers.  

    I am sick of being called "lucky."  There needs to be a focus on TESTING so that early detecting gives the patient a better chance of long-term survival.  Luck shouldn't have anything to do with it!

    - Jay 

    Lucky

    George Orwell was always told he was lucky, when he survived being shot in the throat. He said "lucky' would have been not being shot in the throat.