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My wife was diagnosed with ovarian and uterine cancer Tuesday night. This was very unexpected and has crushed us. She's having surgey to remove both organs next month. We're worried about pulling through the surgery and the chemo treatments that follow. Dr says if all goes well, life expectancyis 1-4 years, that seems like a pretty big gap. Can anyone shed any more light on this? Maybe someone out there has been through this or has/had a loved one who went through it. Any feedback is much appreciatted. 

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  • AWK
    AWK Member Posts: 364 Member
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    She isn't alone and many of us are thriving

    Hugs to you and your wife.  In Feb 2013 I was diagnosed originally via an emergency room visit that turned into a four day hospital stay.  they found two tumors, one softball sized in my uterus and one walnut sized on my right ovary.  I had the radical hysterectomy plus ovaries, tubes, cervix and all pelvic lymph nodes removed during my surgery.  My uterine muscle was 81 percent invaded by cancer, my cervix had cancer plus three pelvic lymph nodes all spread out and one on my para aortic artery.  I was diagnosed stage IIIC uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) Post surgery, second opinion had me at IVA.  It was, and continues to be scary.  after all I have been through the time between initial diagnosis and surgery was the most stressful.  I had six rounds of chemo, 28 of topical radiation and 3 brachytherapy.  Sounds terrible but actually I got through it all pretty well.  And I have to say I have had many many amazing experiences because of my cancer.  I am focused on living fully and moving forward.  I continue with treatments to this day due to progression and metastic tumors but I feel well, work full time and have treatments every three weeks.  My doctors remind me that I am a statistic of one.  I have never asked about the prognosis but my husband has.  She can do this and you can too.  A great resource for information is www.nih.gov/NCI.  

    I am the type of person who needs information and really researched my doctors, hospitals everything.  I have been lucky to have amazing care and really incredible support.  I think my journey has been harder on my husband than me in many ways.  But he is doing well and we are moving forward.  Keeping both of you in My prayers and sending her wishes that she can stay strong and thrive.  What a lucky lady to have you.  Keep reaching out here, you will find many amazing stories, ideas and much support.

    Anne

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    AWK said:

    She isn't alone and many of us are thriving

    Hugs to you and your wife.  In Feb 2013 I was diagnosed originally via an emergency room visit that turned into a four day hospital stay.  they found two tumors, one softball sized in my uterus and one walnut sized on my right ovary.  I had the radical hysterectomy plus ovaries, tubes, cervix and all pelvic lymph nodes removed during my surgery.  My uterine muscle was 81 percent invaded by cancer, my cervix had cancer plus three pelvic lymph nodes all spread out and one on my para aortic artery.  I was diagnosed stage IIIC uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) Post surgery, second opinion had me at IVA.  It was, and continues to be scary.  after all I have been through the time between initial diagnosis and surgery was the most stressful.  I had six rounds of chemo, 28 of topical radiation and 3 brachytherapy.  Sounds terrible but actually I got through it all pretty well.  And I have to say I have had many many amazing experiences because of my cancer.  I am focused on living fully and moving forward.  I continue with treatments to this day due to progression and metastic tumors but I feel well, work full time and have treatments every three weeks.  My doctors remind me that I am a statistic of one.  I have never asked about the prognosis but my husband has.  She can do this and you can too.  A great resource for information is www.nih.gov/NCI.  

    I am the type of person who needs information and really researched my doctors, hospitals everything.  I have been lucky to have amazing care and really incredible support.  I think my journey has been harder on my husband than me in many ways.  But he is doing well and we are moving forward.  Keeping both of you in My prayers and sending her wishes that she can stay strong and thrive.  What a lucky lady to have you.  Keep reaching out here, you will find many amazing stories, ideas and much support.

    Anne

    thank you so much

    AWK, your reply is very appreciatted and inspiring. We're worried about the surgery. We trust the doctors, but it's such a major operation. Do you remember how long the actual surgery was and how you felt right after? Thanks for the prayers, advice and kind words, but I am definitely the lucky one in this relationship. I have no doubt she will fight this like the champ she is. Cancer picked a fight with the wrong person! Good luck to you and your husband with your battle.

  • AWK
    AWK Member Posts: 364 Member
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    bob13440 said:

    thank you so much

    AWK, your reply is very appreciatted and inspiring. We're worried about the surgery. We trust the doctors, but it's such a major operation. Do you remember how long the actual surgery was and how you felt right after? Thanks for the prayers, advice and kind words, but I am definitely the lucky one in this relationship. I have no doubt she will fight this like the champ she is. Cancer picked a fight with the wrong person! Good luck to you and your husband with your battle.

    The surgery itself

    I think mine ran about four hours for the actual surgery.  I had a bikini cut due to the size of the tumors and the spreading my doctor removed the uterus, ovaries and tubes intact as he wanted to contain the cancer as much as possible and preserve as much tissue intaxt as he could for future needs.  (This turned out to be great as I continued my journey and they needed tissue for genome testing last fall.)  I was taken into surgery at 11 and woke up in recovery at six.  The first 24 hours were heavily medicated.  I started to feel a lot of pain the next evening and it took the nurses a little while to get the pain meds settled in so I didn't have peaks and valleys of pain.  I ended up in the hospital for six days, mostly because I have very low blood pressure normally and it got a little too low a few times.  The other reason was the team was divided on whether or not they should start chemo internally right away because of the UPSC.  they got me up and walking the night of my surgery and I walked quite a bit while in the hospital.  When I got home I walked upstairs  all by myself and got around pretty well.  the first few days I slept in a recliner, then in our bed and put pillows around me for my drain and to keep me aware if I started to roll over.  I walked every day, then twice a day.  The first week was the worsT but each day I got better by leaps and bounds.  Within two weeks he took out my drain and to celebrate I went out to lunch with my friends.  She will bounce back quickly I am sure.  

    We stocked up on Philiips Milk of Magnesia for post surgery and that was great.  Green tea, mint tea too. I had a lot of yogurt smoothies, soups, potatoes and ginger ale.  Anything to stay hydrated and keep potassium levels up plus proteins.  I lost a tone of weight and muscle tone after the surgery.  They were focused on my putting weight back in for chemo and radiation.  I ate the same way all through chemo too.  Bring a pillow to the hospital for the car ride home, it will protect her incision and abdomen.  I used that pillow up until the drain came out For sitting, coughing and laughing.  We tend to laugh a lot in my house.  Even then.

    does that help?   

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    AWK said:

    The surgery itself

    I think mine ran about four hours for the actual surgery.  I had a bikini cut due to the size of the tumors and the spreading my doctor removed the uterus, ovaries and tubes intact as he wanted to contain the cancer as much as possible and preserve as much tissue intaxt as he could for future needs.  (This turned out to be great as I continued my journey and they needed tissue for genome testing last fall.)  I was taken into surgery at 11 and woke up in recovery at six.  The first 24 hours were heavily medicated.  I started to feel a lot of pain the next evening and it took the nurses a little while to get the pain meds settled in so I didn't have peaks and valleys of pain.  I ended up in the hospital for six days, mostly because I have very low blood pressure normally and it got a little too low a few times.  The other reason was the team was divided on whether or not they should start chemo internally right away because of the UPSC.  they got me up and walking the night of my surgery and I walked quite a bit while in the hospital.  When I got home I walked upstairs  all by myself and got around pretty well.  the first few days I slept in a recliner, then in our bed and put pillows around me for my drain and to keep me aware if I started to roll over.  I walked every day, then twice a day.  The first week was the worsT but each day I got better by leaps and bounds.  Within two weeks he took out my drain and to celebrate I went out to lunch with my friends.  She will bounce back quickly I am sure.  

    We stocked up on Philiips Milk of Magnesia for post surgery and that was great.  Green tea, mint tea too. I had a lot of yogurt smoothies, soups, potatoes and ginger ale.  Anything to stay hydrated and keep potassium levels up plus proteins.  I lost a tone of weight and muscle tone after the surgery.  They were focused on my putting weight back in for chemo and radiation.  I ate the same way all through chemo too.  Bring a pillow to the hospital for the car ride home, it will protect her incision and abdomen.  I used that pillow up until the drain came out For sitting, coughing and laughing.  We tend to laugh a lot in my house.  Even then.

    does that help?   

    incredible

    heck yes that helped! Hearing about how someone else went through this is giving us hope and a form of guidance. Thank you for the thorough details and the tip on the pillow and diet you used. It's refreshing to know there are such kind, supportive people out there. Thanks again AWK!

  • Kaleena
    Kaleena Member Posts: 2,088 Member
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    Hi Bob
    sorry to hear about

    Hi Bob

    sorry to hear about your wife's situation.   However with you by her side she will be able to do this.   I had two major surgeries within a month.  a total hysterectomy wherein they removed the ovaries uterus one ten and appendix plus many lymph nodes.   does your wife gave two separate cancers or one type.   I have endometrial in my uterus and on my ovary.   They treated as ovarian.   

    Mthe main thing with the surgery (if they are doing it traditionally and not Davinci) is to make sure dhe drinks water and walks around.   The pain meds can give her constipation.   The quicker she can get her bowels going the quicker she can leave the hospital.  Usually 3 days.  Even when she feels better she shouldn't over do it lifting wise.   The first chemo of choice is carboplatin and taxol.  She will probably be given some meds to take the day before treatment.   she may get very tired several days after treatment.  Aldo she may have a port placed.  I had one in for six years and only used it for six months.  

    My best to you and your wife

    Kathy

  • Sandy3185
    Sandy3185 Member Posts: 229 Member
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    Surgery

    Hi Bob, So sorry that you and your wife have started this fight, but this is a great place to get advice and share your fears. I was diagnosed in Oct 2013 with UPSC and had my surgery 12/05/13. I had a complete hysterectomy with removal of all my lady parts.  Mine was an open surgery not the DaVinci. I was in surgery about 6 hours. When I first was taken to my room, I was pretty out of it and heavily sedated. They had me hooked up to a morphine pump and I don't remember feeling a lot of pain that first day. As I didn't come out of surgery and recovery til around 6PM, they didn't make me get up until the next morning. Getting out of bed was not fun! I stayed in the hospital for 6 days and by the time I went home I was feeling a lot stronger. I walked quite a bit while I was in the hospital and was able to get around by myself. I was still in pain when I went home, but, in retrospect I realize that I was more in fear of pain. I kept taking the pain killer( oxicodone) and they made me feel nauseous all the time. As a result, I spent most of the next 2 weeks in bed or in the recliner. I finally realized that I did not really need this much medication and cut back to just taking it before bed. I gradually began to feel better and began eating more nutritious meals. I soon started to regain my strength ( and my appetite!).

    i was diagnosed with both uterine and cervical cancer, UPSC stage 2 grade 3. It has been 7 months since I finished chemo and internal radiation. So far everything is great. No evidence of cancer on my last 2 quarterly exams, my hair is growing back and I feel great! Surgery is scary and so is chemo and radiation, but they are doable. No one knows for sure if cancer will reoccur, not even your doctor but if you start reading some of the threads on this board you will see that many of our members have survived and flourished for many years after diagnosis.

    Sandy

  • Ro10
    Ro10 Member Posts: 1,561 Member
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    Bob, sorry you and your wife have to face this

    Welcome to this site.  Feel free to come back with any questions or fears you may have.  We all know the fear of the unknown of what is ahead.  We all know how scary it is to hear that Cancer word.

    As far as the surgery, I had the DaVinci Robotic surgery. My surgery was 6 hours long.  They removed the uterus, ovaries, tubes and 25 lymph nodes.  5 of the nodes were positive and I had positive cells in the abdominal wash.  I was diagnosed with UPSC stage 3- C.

    i was told that the Cancer was not curable, but treatable...like a chronic disease.  So that is what I have been doing for the last 6 years.  I have had chemo 3 different times.  I recently had intense radiation (SBRT) to a lymph node close to my trachea.  I know I will need chemo again,but it has been since 5/12 when I finished my last chemo.  I am currently taking Aromasin which slows the Cancer growth.

    I don't know how they can give you a life expectancy before your wife has had her surgery and really know what stage she is.  Everyone responds differently to the treatment.  As many will say we are all a statistic of one.  I would advise you not to read things on the Internet.  Most of it is old statistics, and is very scary.  They have made a lot of advances in treatment of cancer and the side effects of chemo.  Reading posts from this discussion group will give you information on current treatments.

    Remember to take care of yourself, too.  You will need your strength to help support your wife.  Take it a day at a time, and try to find some joy in each day.  You and your wife will be added to my prayers.  In peace and caring.

  • Abbycat2
    Abbycat2 Member Posts: 644 Member
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    Ro10 said:

    Bob, sorry you and your wife have to face this

    Welcome to this site.  Feel free to come back with any questions or fears you may have.  We all know the fear of the unknown of what is ahead.  We all know how scary it is to hear that Cancer word.

    As far as the surgery, I had the DaVinci Robotic surgery. My surgery was 6 hours long.  They removed the uterus, ovaries, tubes and 25 lymph nodes.  5 of the nodes were positive and I had positive cells in the abdominal wash.  I was diagnosed with UPSC stage 3- C.

    i was told that the Cancer was not curable, but treatable...like a chronic disease.  So that is what I have been doing for the last 6 years.  I have had chemo 3 different times.  I recently had intense radiation (SBRT) to a lymph node close to my trachea.  I know I will need chemo again,but it has been since 5/12 when I finished my last chemo.  I am currently taking Aromasin which slows the Cancer growth.

    I don't know how they can give you a life expectancy before your wife has had her surgery and really know what stage she is.  Everyone responds differently to the treatment.  As many will say we are all a statistic of one.  I would advise you not to read things on the Internet.  Most of it is old statistics, and is very scary.  They have made a lot of advances in treatment of cancer and the side effects of chemo.  Reading posts from this discussion group will give you information on current treatments.

    Remember to take care of yourself, too.  You will need your strength to help support your wife.  Take it a day at a time, and try to find some joy in each day.  You and your wife will be added to my prayers.  In peace and caring.

    Treatment

    Bob,

    There isn't much I can add to what the other ladies have already said. I had the Davinci robotic surgery  and was in the hospital over night. Going into the surgery, my uterine biopsy indicated that I had a grade 2 cancer; not so! It was only after the surgery and we received the pathology report that I learned the truth. Staging occurs from what the doctor discovers during surgery and from the pathology report. I don 't know how your doctor can predict your wife 's survival beforehand. Hopefully, surgery and the path report will show a low stage and grade. My uterine cancer metastasized to my ovary and to the outside of my ovary. I had a positive wash. I had 6 rounds of carbo /taxol ending in March, 2014. No radiation. So far I am NED. Is a gynecologic oncologist doing the surgery?

    Warm regards to you both,

    Cathy

     

     

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    Abbycat2 said:

    Treatment

    Bob,

    There isn't much I can add to what the other ladies have already said. I had the Davinci robotic surgery  and was in the hospital over night. Going into the surgery, my uterine biopsy indicated that I had a grade 2 cancer; not so! It was only after the surgery and we received the pathology report that I learned the truth. Staging occurs from what the doctor discovers during surgery and from the pathology report. I don 't know how your doctor can predict your wife 's survival beforehand. Hopefully, surgery and the path report will show a low stage and grade. My uterine cancer metastasized to my ovary and to the outside of my ovary. I had a positive wash. I had 6 rounds of carbo /taxol ending in March, 2014. No radiation. So far I am NED. Is a gynecologic oncologist doing the surgery?

    Warm regards to you both,

    Cathy

     

     

    Everyone

    evry word that all of you have posted is so appreciated! This has lifted our spirits. You all seem to be doing great and your spirit is definitely rubbing off. I'm very interested to ask the Dr tomorrow (she has to have some fluids drained from her lungs) about the initial 1-4 expectancy. She's having some discomfort breathing right now and the growth in her stomach seems to get bigger every day, we just want to get through the surgery so she can get rid of that and start to recover before chemo.

    As I read all of these comments, I have to pause and dry my eyes, it makes me very emotional to hear such encouragment from people I've never met. Saying thank you to all of you doesn't feel strong enough , but, thank you, thank you, thank you so verymuch and keep on fighting.

  • AWK
    AWK Member Posts: 364 Member
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    bob13440 said:

    Everyone

    evry word that all of you have posted is so appreciated! This has lifted our spirits. You all seem to be doing great and your spirit is definitely rubbing off. I'm very interested to ask the Dr tomorrow (she has to have some fluids drained from her lungs) about the initial 1-4 expectancy. She's having some discomfort breathing right now and the growth in her stomach seems to get bigger every day, we just want to get through the surgery so she can get rid of that and start to recover before chemo.

    As I read all of these comments, I have to pause and dry my eyes, it makes me very emotional to hear such encouragment from people I've never met. Saying thank you to all of you doesn't feel strong enough , but, thank you, thank you, thank you so verymuch and keep on fighting.

    We are with both of you

    There is strength in numbers.  These ladies have really carried me through good and bad days.  Keeping you both in my prayers.

  • Hopeful162
    Hopeful162 Member Posts: 82
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    bob13440 said:

    Everyone

    evry word that all of you have posted is so appreciated! This has lifted our spirits. You all seem to be doing great and your spirit is definitely rubbing off. I'm very interested to ask the Dr tomorrow (she has to have some fluids drained from her lungs) about the initial 1-4 expectancy. She's having some discomfort breathing right now and the growth in her stomach seems to get bigger every day, we just want to get through the surgery so she can get rid of that and start to recover before chemo.

    As I read all of these comments, I have to pause and dry my eyes, it makes me very emotional to hear such encouragment from people I've never met. Saying thank you to all of you doesn't feel strong enough , but, thank you, thank you, thank you so verymuch and keep on fighting.

    Take courage

    Bob, I have been reading on these boards for several months now (though not chiming in very often) and I also feel as though I have come to know some of these ladies through their constant upbeat comments, and you are right, it is so encouraging to hear what they have to say. I have just finished round three of chemo, carbol/taxol for USPC (original stage 1A, grade 3), and feel so much more confident now than when getting that initial biopsy diagnosis with its dire predictions of my future!

    For my surgery I had everything removed via DaVinci, including 13 lymph nodes, part of my omentum and a pelvic wash. Surgery took about 3-4 hours and I stayed overnight in the hospital with a catheter, but was walking the next morning. Once home I only took iBuprofen and was not too uncomfortable. I took a laxative as I had trouble with BMs for the next three days (like none), and I was told up front, "nothing in the vagina," including bath water, and no lifting over ten pounds for eight weeks, which I followed.

    For me, chemo has about four bad days every three weeks, but no nausea, so I am getting through it. Having no hair anywhere has been interesting and not particularly disturbing to me. So, I am sure your wife will get through this and be able to look back on it all as simply a change in the usual routine of life. For all of us, we would be smart to live each day given us to the best we are able.

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    Abbycat2 said:

    Treatment

    Bob,

    There isn't much I can add to what the other ladies have already said. I had the Davinci robotic surgery  and was in the hospital over night. Going into the surgery, my uterine biopsy indicated that I had a grade 2 cancer; not so! It was only after the surgery and we received the pathology report that I learned the truth. Staging occurs from what the doctor discovers during surgery and from the pathology report. I don 't know how your doctor can predict your wife 's survival beforehand. Hopefully, surgery and the path report will show a low stage and grade. My uterine cancer metastasized to my ovary and to the outside of my ovary. I had a positive wash. I had 6 rounds of carbo /taxol ending in March, 2014. No radiation. So far I am NED. Is a gynecologic oncologist doing the surgery?

    Warm regards to you both,

    Cathy

     

     

    Abbycat2

    Cathy,Yes, a gynecologic oncologist is doing the surgery. Does this mean something that we should be worried or take comfort in?

  • ConnieSW
    ConnieSW Member Posts: 1,688 Member
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    bob13440 said:

    Abbycat2

    Cathy,Yes, a gynecologic oncologist is doing the surgery. Does this mean something that we should be worried or take comfort in?

    Definitely

    Take comfort in.

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    ConnieSW said:

    Definitely

    Take comfort in.

    Thank you

    thanks for the feedback Connie.

    They drained six liters of fluid from her today which has really helped her breathing. I don't like that there was that much in her, but at least she's more comfortable. The first step of a very long journey, but we're ready to fight our butts off! Thanks again everyone and continued success in your battles.

  • pinky104
    pinky104 Member Posts: 574 Member
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    Bob

    I just want to know that I am a survivor of stage IVb uterine cancer (uterine papillary serous carcinoma, a very aggressive cancer).  At first my gynecological oncologist thought I had ovarian cancer, but he went before a tumor board of doctors and the joint decision was made that it started out in the uterus.  I had metastases to both ovaries, the omentum (the fatty layer in the abdomen), and the small intestine.   I am 4 years and 7 months out from my surgery.  I had a suspicious mass found last year in my paracolic gutter (in the back) but the doctor says it hasn't grown, so he no longer thinks it's cancer (it could be a fluid collection from having had lymph nodes removed).  

    My surgery was long (5 or 6 hours) but I also had my gallbladder and appendix taken out by another surgeon during my cancer surgery, as gallstones had shown up in the CT scan I had before surgery.  I was in the hospital for 6 days as I couldn't get my bowel function back. It may have had something to do with the horrible hospital food that I had to force myself to eat.  I couldn't get much of it down.  

    All I had was 6 rounds of chemo (Carboplatin and Paclitaxel ("Taxol")).  I didn't have any radiation because they would have had to do it on too large an area.

    Tell your wife not to give up--there are survivors out here.  It's a long journey.  The surgery was pretty uncomfortable.  The chemo for me wasn't too bad.  I never got nausea or vomiting because I was given a drug called Emend before each round of chemo, and through the first days of it.  I did get very short of breath and needed tranfusions (two units two days after surgery due to blood loss and one in the middle of my chemo treatments due to chemo induced anemia).  I refused the Neulasta shot they give during chemo because it had a risk of heart attacks.  My younger brother had unexpectedly died of a heart attack in the week just before they asked me to have the shot.

    I'm probably healthier now than I've been in a long time.  

    Good luck to you and your wife, and we'll pray for her.     

  • Abbycat2
    Abbycat2 Member Posts: 644 Member
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    bob13440 said:

    Thank you

    thanks for the feedback Connie.

    They drained six liters of fluid from her today which has really helped her breathing. I don't like that there was that much in her, but at least she's more comfortable. The first step of a very long journey, but we're ready to fight our butts off! Thanks again everyone and continued success in your battles.

    Bob, good choice in selecting a gyne oncologist

    Good evening, Bob . I know how terribly difficult this is for you and your wife and I wish I had the power to make your worries disappear. Selecting a gynecologic oncologist was a wise choice as these specialists are trained to handle below the belt female cancers. You mention fluid being drained. Does your wife have ascites? 

    Wishing you and your wife only the best,

    Cathy

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    pinky104 said:

    Bob

    I just want to know that I am a survivor of stage IVb uterine cancer (uterine papillary serous carcinoma, a very aggressive cancer).  At first my gynecological oncologist thought I had ovarian cancer, but he went before a tumor board of doctors and the joint decision was made that it started out in the uterus.  I had metastases to both ovaries, the omentum (the fatty layer in the abdomen), and the small intestine.   I am 4 years and 7 months out from my surgery.  I had a suspicious mass found last year in my paracolic gutter (in the back) but the doctor says it hasn't grown, so he no longer thinks it's cancer (it could be a fluid collection from having had lymph nodes removed).  

    My surgery was long (5 or 6 hours) but I also had my gallbladder and appendix taken out by another surgeon during my cancer surgery, as gallstones had shown up in the CT scan I had before surgery.  I was in the hospital for 6 days as I couldn't get my bowel function back. It may have had something to do with the horrible hospital food that I had to force myself to eat.  I couldn't get much of it down.  

    All I had was 6 rounds of chemo (Carboplatin and Paclitaxel ("Taxol")).  I didn't have any radiation because they would have had to do it on too large an area.

    Tell your wife not to give up--there are survivors out here.  It's a long journey.  The surgery was pretty uncomfortable.  The chemo for me wasn't too bad.  I never got nausea or vomiting because I was given a drug called Emend before each round of chemo, and through the first days of it.  I did get very short of breath and needed tranfusions (two units two days after surgery due to blood loss and one in the middle of my chemo treatments due to chemo induced anemia).  I refused the Neulasta shot they give during chemo because it had a risk of heart attacks.  My younger brother had unexpectedly died of a heart attack in the week just before they asked me to have the shot.

    I'm probably healthier now than I've been in a long time.  

    Good luck to you and your wife, and we'll pray for her.     

    pinky

    what a wonderfil story! Not thinking it's cancer anymore is nothing short of a miracle! They told us she has uterine and ovarian cancer and won't know what else it has attacked until after surgery, it's really scary. Reading all of these comments to her has given both of us so much hope. We feel veryconnected to all of you.

  • AWK
    AWK Member Posts: 364 Member
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    bob13440 said:

    pinky

    what a wonderfil story! Not thinking it's cancer anymore is nothing short of a miracle! They told us she has uterine and ovarian cancer and won't know what else it has attacked until after surgery, it's really scary. Reading all of these comments to her has given both of us so much hope. We feel veryconnected to all of you.

    Please keep us posted and keep reaching out!

    Keeping you both in our prayers.  All of my favorite ladies have weighed in on this chain so you are in great hands.  If the surgery yields even more than expected, don't worry.  Many of us had unexpected news after our surgeries and are doing well.  I have metatasis and progression, am still in treatment and working, riding horses and living with this now 24 months after initial diagnosis.  Take it one day at a time and we are here for both of you.  Hugs and prayers.  Anne 

  • bob13440
    bob13440 Member Posts: 66
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    AWK said:

    Please keep us posted and keep reaching out!

    Keeping you both in our prayers.  All of my favorite ladies have weighed in on this chain so you are in great hands.  If the surgery yields even more than expected, don't worry.  Many of us had unexpected news after our surgeries and are doing well.  I have metatasis and progression, am still in treatment and working, riding horses and living with this now 24 months after initial diagnosis.  Take it one day at a time and we are here for both of you.  Hugs and prayers.  Anne 

    Anne

    The ups and downs in this first week have been incredible as I'm sure you're all familiar with. She's so tired and keeps coughing. They took a lot of blood from her and built up fluids so I'm sure that's a big factor. She's still going to work everyday because she says it keeps her mind off of things,  but I wonder if it's hurting her physically. She's also scared about surgery, says, "what if i don't wake up?" I try to assure her that these doctors are professionals and she is going to feel much better after surgery. I love her so much, but I'm not sure my encouagement is having an affect on her anymore. I'mfeeling so helpless. I will definitely keep the updates coming.

  • Sandy3185
    Sandy3185 Member Posts: 229 Member
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    Fear

    Hi Bob. So sorry that you are both going through this. The waiting is the worse part. Waiting for answers, waiting for diagnosis, waiting for surgery. So much to worry about. I too worried that I wouldn't wake up, but I did. The answers came, the treatments occurred and I got better. This is serious surgery but you need to trust that your doctor knows what he is doing and that all will go well. Let your wife know that we are all pulling for her and keeping her in our prayers. Working is a good thing if your wife feels up to it. It will help her keep her mind off the surgery and keep a sense of normality. Maybe visits from family will give her some comfort.  I know I tried to keep my children's spirits up, as well as my husbands. This, in turn, helped me to think positively and I went into surgery sure that not only would I survive but that I would beat this monster within me. I hope your wife is reading our discussion boards and can take some comfort from the stories that unfold here.

    Sandy