Any middle school teachers? What do you tell parents and students?

arbojenn
arbojenn Member Posts: 118
edited March 2014 in Breast Cancer #1
Thank goodness it is the end of the school year. I have been out for three weeks to have my recurrent BC staged. I am going back on June 1 to finish out the year. I am going to tell the kids and parents I had medical issues, but now I am back. I am on Femara for a few months, then I need to have surgery to have my reconstruction and surrounding tissues removed--will need skin grafts-- and then radiation. So after starting the school year, I will be off again. I don't want word to get out because it may cause problems with parents: one of my partners this year was pregnant and the parents had a fit because she would be out on maternity leave. They really gave her a bad time. Imagine what they would do with this? Plus, there is always the hope that maybe there has been some mistake and all I will need is to keep up with this Femara. (Silly, but things can happen!)

Then also, there is the misconception that work as a teacher is no more physically demanding than "light housework" when it comes time to return to work. (If they only knew!)

I would love to know how you all handle this.

Many thanks!
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Comments

  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    work
    arbojenn, I am not a teacher and can't advise you on your situation, but I wanted to welcome you to the site. I'm so sorry you are having to deal with recurrent breast cancer and work issues at the same time. The parents here seem unreasonable. Yes, it's nice to have your child's teacher remain in class the whole school year, but things happen, people get sick or pregnant all the time. These people need to be reasonable. Your medical issues are your business and you don't have to come up with a detailed explanation. If it were me, I would make the plans I needed to take optimal care of myself and then give a short explanation focusing on what will happen in the classroom (a substitute will take over from such and such date, etc). Then tune out the problem parents and take care of yourself.

    This is a great site to come to vent about anything, so please do so.

    Mimi
  • sunnygirl
    sunnygirl Member Posts: 57 Member
    middle school
    Arbojenn,
    Sorry you are going through this recurrence but you've found a site with very supportive people to help you along the way.

    I no longer teach in the middle school, I'm retired, but I did teach there for 30+ yrs. I can tell you how I think I would handle it. I would lay the cards on the table with the kids--tell them what's going on, what to expect, what you plan to do, what you hope they will do. I found the kids to be very compassionate and a great "upper" in my down times. I would first clear this with my administrator and union people. Don't know where you are, but I'm in NY and the teachers' union is very much part of the picture. I would be happy to set up private commucnication with you, if I can help.

    My best to you, Cheryl
  • fauxma
    fauxma Member Posts: 3,577 Member
    I was not a teacher, but I
    I was not a teacher, but I worked in the band room at a middle school for 15 years. I was working there when I had my uterine cancer. I wasn't sure what to tell the kids either. I was going to be gone for 2 to 3 months and I needed to give some explanation. Just saying health issues leaves them to their own imagination and rumors would have run amok. I opted to tell them the basics, surgery and radiation, maybe chemo (that turned out a no) and to let them know that I was going to be fine and would be back. They asked questions, would I lose my hair during treatment, would I be sick from radiation, etc. I answered them honestly. The parents were super supportive. Two even shared my job as volunteers (my position was paid by the band boosters, not the school district),
    But I know what you mean about how some parents react. When my daughter was in grade school, her teacher was 6 months pregnant at the beginning of the year and went on leave in December and didn't return that year. I was delighted for her and so were most of the other parents. But there were a few that had a fit, went on and on about she should have planned it so that she gave birth at the end of the year and could return in September or she should just have not done the year, how unfair she was to the kids, etc. I thought they were **** and said so (more tactfully). That being said, we had a teacher the following year that had cancer and had to leave mid year for treatment. These same parents were totally supportive of him, as was everyone else. So my opinion is that most, if not all, of the parents will be sympathetic and supportive. I would be as upfront with them as you are comfortable with. And if there is bad reactions, that's their problem. You have enough to deal with.
    I think, though, that the major feeling is with the unreasonable parents, that a pregnancy was a choice, but illness is not.
    Hope this helps.
    Stef
  • crazylady55
    crazylady55 Member Posts: 92
    fauxma said:

    I was not a teacher, but I
    I was not a teacher, but I worked in the band room at a middle school for 15 years. I was working there when I had my uterine cancer. I wasn't sure what to tell the kids either. I was going to be gone for 2 to 3 months and I needed to give some explanation. Just saying health issues leaves them to their own imagination and rumors would have run amok. I opted to tell them the basics, surgery and radiation, maybe chemo (that turned out a no) and to let them know that I was going to be fine and would be back. They asked questions, would I lose my hair during treatment, would I be sick from radiation, etc. I answered them honestly. The parents were super supportive. Two even shared my job as volunteers (my position was paid by the band boosters, not the school district),
    But I know what you mean about how some parents react. When my daughter was in grade school, her teacher was 6 months pregnant at the beginning of the year and went on leave in December and didn't return that year. I was delighted for her and so were most of the other parents. But there were a few that had a fit, went on and on about she should have planned it so that she gave birth at the end of the year and could return in September or she should just have not done the year, how unfair she was to the kids, etc. I thought they were **** and said so (more tactfully). That being said, we had a teacher the following year that had cancer and had to leave mid year for treatment. These same parents were totally supportive of him, as was everyone else. So my opinion is that most, if not all, of the parents will be sympathetic and supportive. I would be as upfront with them as you are comfortable with. And if there is bad reactions, that's their problem. You have enough to deal with.
    I think, though, that the major feeling is with the unreasonable parents, that a pregnancy was a choice, but illness is not.
    Hope this helps.
    Stef

    I am a teacher
    I am a special education infant/toddler teacher, so the kids I work with don't need any explanation but I work very closely with their families(actually in their homes and at school). I was diagnosed in Sept 2008. The worst month for a teacher to get the diagnosis. When I had the lumpectomy I was only out of work for about 2 weeks so I just left it generic that I had a medical procedure. When I found out that I could not work through chemo (I started in Nov.) I thought I would be out for a few months so I told the families that I was closest to about my diagnosis. At the time, I had difficulty telling some that I was not as close to so I left it that I was going to be on medical leave. When I needed the mastectomy and radiation and found that I would miss the rest of the year, I asked my
    co-workers/substitute to tell the families why I was out. They have been very understanding and I have received cards and notes from them.

    I think that you need to base what you do on your comfort level and focus on your health not whether or not the parents will "have a fit". I think the kids probably do need an explanation but how much detail should be up to you. If you have a supportive principal or other staff person you may enlist their help if like me you are unable to talk about your illness at this time.

    Best wishes to you,
  • Kylez
    Kylez Member Posts: 3,761 Member
    Welcome to this site as I am
    Welcome to this site as I am new here too, but, am enjoying reading all of the posts. I would think that being up front and honest with the students would be the best approach. After all, they are the ones that you are dealing with day to day. Kids can be great!
  • Christmas Girl
    Christmas Girl Member Posts: 3,682 Member
    Warm welcome, arbojenn!
    You've joined the perfect group, amazing folks with open hearts. Already, many here have responded with encouragement and support. And valuable suggestions for your consideration.

    Having never been a teacher (by the way - thank you for what you do!), I can't speak specifically to your situation and concerns. It's obvious you very much care for both your students and their parents. That being said...

    Nothing is more important than your own health. Both your physical health, at the moment - beating your BC back into submission, and your mental/emotional health. I'll be hoping all works out well for you.

    Kind regards, Susan
  • cats_toy
    cats_toy Member Posts: 1,462 Member
    good advice
    welcome to the best group of people you can find. Looks like you have already received a bunch of good advice from a few of us already. I cannot add anything about teaching school, but you will know your own level of fatigue and always pay attention when your body tells you it's time to rest. And yes, I agree on laying it all out on the table for the kids, they are smarter that most people give them credit for and they will do fine.
    Good luck with all to come

    =^..^=
  • mmontero38
    mmontero38 Member Posts: 1,510
    Welcome Arbojenn to the club
    Welcome Arbojenn to the club and sorry you have to be here. Though I am not a teacher, I would just say that you are battling breast cancer. The kids I think would be very understanding and supportive. As for the parents, if they can't be understanding, then they don't deserve your fret and worry. No one can control what's going to happen in life. So, worry about yourself first and in beating the beast and know we are all here to support you. Hugs, Lili
  • seof
    seof Member Posts: 819 Member
    I am a Speech Language
    I am a Speech Language Pathologist. I work in an elementary school with K-4th grade. I was diagnosed in the summer of 07. We had just initiated a new dress code for the District which prohibited anything worn on the head for students or teachers. I had a very supportive Principal who allowed me to wear hats, but I expected a lot of questions from students because the dress code had been contoversial. To my surprise only 2 out of 40 students on my caseload at that school asked me anything. One was a 4th grade girl who is very "fashion-conscious". I just said that I had cancer and the medicine to help me get better made my hair fall out, so the Principal gave me permission to wear hats. That was sufficient for her. The other student surprised me. He was also a 4th grader, but one of those "tough guys" who give the intentional impression that they could care less what goes on with anyone else. When school started up I noticed that he was watching me very closely, but he did not say anything, and I just went about business as usual, waiting for him to bring up the subject if he wanted to. One day when it was just the 2 of us in the room, he asked me if he could say something, so I said yes, expecting him to make a smart remark about why I was out of dress code, or something. Instead he very cautiously said, "you have cancer, don't you?" I said, "yes, how did you know?" He said his cousin had died from cancer the year before. We had a very informative conversation. We learned a lot about each other, and he was very much better behaved in my class the whole year. He became one of my great supporters (if only when no one else could see or hear him). My approach with students and teachers alike was basically to wait till I was asked, then to be brief and to the point. I had a mastectomy over the Christmas break and was on leave for the month of January. I told the Principal and a few teachers I felt comfortable talking to, and I told my students I was having surgery and there would be a sub. for a month. Other than the boy mentioned above, none of the students really had much to say about it. I don't have as many dealings with parents as classroom teachers do, so most of the parents did not know.

    That's my experience. I think if I was working with middle school students I would briefly and truthfully tell them what to expect and why. I think kids can handle more than we think they can. I hope you have the support of your administrators and colleagues. If you have their support, parents can be referred to them if the parents have a problem.

    I hope this helps, seof.
  • dyaneb123
    dyaneb123 Member Posts: 950

    Welcome Arbojenn to the club
    Welcome Arbojenn to the club and sorry you have to be here. Though I am not a teacher, I would just say that you are battling breast cancer. The kids I think would be very understanding and supportive. As for the parents, if they can't be understanding, then they don't deserve your fret and worry. No one can control what's going to happen in life. So, worry about yourself first and in beating the beast and know we are all here to support you. Hugs, Lili

    Well ...I am a teacher
    Hey Arbojenn
    I am a high school teacher. I was diagnosed in March and basically have missed the whole last six weeks of school. Of course my kids are older but I just told them the truth and set to work preparing 6 weeks worth of sub work. They and the school staff have been nothing but supportive.Now, in our system, if you miss more than 20 consecutive days the system has to find a certified teacher to take over your class til you get back, so really your parents have nothing to gripe about...and if they are that lame that they would gripe about a teacher being out for cancer treatment.... screw 'em anyway!Their kids will be fine...the question is will YOU be fine....so take care of yourself first...
    I won't finish chemo til the end of Sept. so I may miss again in the Fall too. The reality is that in our school probably 3/4 of the staff is nearing retirement age and we're all starting to have physical ailments that require long absences from school. We don't have to apologize for that. The school just has to learn to compensate.
    So do what you gotta do
    Dee
  • arbojenn
    arbojenn Member Posts: 118
    seof said:

    I am a Speech Language
    I am a Speech Language Pathologist. I work in an elementary school with K-4th grade. I was diagnosed in the summer of 07. We had just initiated a new dress code for the District which prohibited anything worn on the head for students or teachers. I had a very supportive Principal who allowed me to wear hats, but I expected a lot of questions from students because the dress code had been contoversial. To my surprise only 2 out of 40 students on my caseload at that school asked me anything. One was a 4th grade girl who is very "fashion-conscious". I just said that I had cancer and the medicine to help me get better made my hair fall out, so the Principal gave me permission to wear hats. That was sufficient for her. The other student surprised me. He was also a 4th grader, but one of those "tough guys" who give the intentional impression that they could care less what goes on with anyone else. When school started up I noticed that he was watching me very closely, but he did not say anything, and I just went about business as usual, waiting for him to bring up the subject if he wanted to. One day when it was just the 2 of us in the room, he asked me if he could say something, so I said yes, expecting him to make a smart remark about why I was out of dress code, or something. Instead he very cautiously said, "you have cancer, don't you?" I said, "yes, how did you know?" He said his cousin had died from cancer the year before. We had a very informative conversation. We learned a lot about each other, and he was very much better behaved in my class the whole year. He became one of my great supporters (if only when no one else could see or hear him). My approach with students and teachers alike was basically to wait till I was asked, then to be brief and to the point. I had a mastectomy over the Christmas break and was on leave for the month of January. I told the Principal and a few teachers I felt comfortable talking to, and I told my students I was having surgery and there would be a sub. for a month. Other than the boy mentioned above, none of the students really had much to say about it. I don't have as many dealings with parents as classroom teachers do, so most of the parents did not know.

    That's my experience. I think if I was working with middle school students I would briefly and truthfully tell them what to expect and why. I think kids can handle more than we think they can. I hope you have the support of your administrators and colleagues. If you have their support, parents can be referred to them if the parents have a problem.

    I hope this helps, seof.

    Thank you!
    You have all brought up very insightful ideas to ponder and hope for what is to come. I think I might just leave this year with an "I was out for medical reasons" and leave it at that unless they ask. They're about to fly away and at this point it won't seem to matter much. But next year, I think you are right: I need to lay my cards on the table. We are not permitted to have a union here but if the current administration stays,they will be supportive. If I can find a good sub, able to follow and deliver the curriculum with her own plans, it would be good to leave them with the truth, and show them that we do come back from this stronger--and better able to fuss at them to do their homework. It puts me at ease knowing I have a plan. In the back of my mind, I can't help wonder if there is a mistake. I do have nodules all over my reconstruction, but they change to areas of flat, thickend skin. The biopsies concluded recurrent breast cancer, but didn't have the path report from my first to compare. Do breast lesions act this way? My primary one was just invasive microcalcificaions with one positive node. I had five years of tamoxifen after my chemo then two of Femara. Now it is back. But I wonder if it is really something else. The PET scan showed an suv of 8 for the bad side. It also showed a bright area, suv of 2.5 under my other arm. I can't think that there is anything there. The doctors both said they felt an enlargement, but I didn't feel anything but got achy when they were probing. I'm thinking that is an infection adn when I go for the ultrasound guided needle biopsy, they won't be able to find anything and I will look like the idiot I probably am. They lumps and skin thicknesses cover the entire area, even the transplanted skin, and I look gross. I have been on femara a week and I THINK I see a change, but maybe that is the three core biopsies done on that side. This did quiet down when one escpecially was removed, so I am hoping the diagnosis was wrong and it is just a weird infection. Could that be possible, or am I in denial?

    I need to educate myself so I can help you guys, too.

    "
  • lynn1950
    lynn1950 Member Posts: 2,570
    Teacher too
    I teach K-12 Gifted and Talented and was diagnosed in Feb. 08. I had a wonderful reading group of 6th graders and their love and support ( I asked them to send me jokes while I was out of school) really helped me. A week before my surgery (in April) I drove us 4 hours to hear Greg Mortenson speak (we had just read 3 Cups of Tea) and they met Greg who gave them autographed books. We slept in a Catholic Church and returned home the next day. The kids were and are absolutely wonderful (they gave me a clown wig to wear in the fall when I returned to school bald) and the parents and the school district have been so supportive it breaks my heart. Each situation is different, so you can go with your gut instinct. Lynn
  • dyaneb123
    dyaneb123 Member Posts: 950
    lynn1950 said:

    Teacher too
    I teach K-12 Gifted and Talented and was diagnosed in Feb. 08. I had a wonderful reading group of 6th graders and their love and support ( I asked them to send me jokes while I was out of school) really helped me. A week before my surgery (in April) I drove us 4 hours to hear Greg Mortenson speak (we had just read 3 Cups of Tea) and they met Greg who gave them autographed books. We slept in a Catholic Church and returned home the next day. The kids were and are absolutely wonderful (they gave me a clown wig to wear in the fall when I returned to school bald) and the parents and the school district have been so supportive it breaks my heart. Each situation is different, so you can go with your gut instinct. Lynn

    I can't answer your
    I can't answer your questions, I'm just beginning this journey...but I have found excellent info on this site . Read the info about your dx and continue asking questions. Someone here has been through the same experience and will be able to help.
    Good luck
    Dee
  • chenheart
    chenheart Member Posts: 5,159
    dyaneb123 said:

    I can't answer your
    I can't answer your questions, I'm just beginning this journey...but I have found excellent info on this site . Read the info about your dx and continue asking questions. Someone here has been through the same experience and will be able to help.
    Good luck
    Dee

    Bumping this up to add to
    Bumping this up to add to the thread about teachers! Hope it helps!
  • Mama G
    Mama G Member Posts: 762
    chenheart said:

    Bumping this up to add to
    Bumping this up to add to the thread about teachers! Hope it helps!

    I teach 5th grade science and writing
    and started the year with a full head of hair. My class and parents have been extremely supportive! I am so blessed. I told them from the start and the amazing thing was that there were 4 parents who had been already affected by cancer in some way. One of the girls in my class had lost her mom the year before to cancer. So I think God put me in that room for a purpose. Today was our first day back from Christmas break and I showed them my 1/2 inch hair growth and they all cheered and clapped for me!
  • lovelylola
    lovelylola Member Posts: 279
    chenheart said:

    Bumping this up to add to
    Bumping this up to add to the thread about teachers! Hope it helps!

    Thanks for bumping this up Chen
    I head back to school tomorrow and spent several days debating on whether or not to go "au naturale". It's so hot (yes, I know you midwesters and easterners are jealous) and muggy here in Hawaii right now and I haven't used a scarf, wig or hat the entire winter break. I have decided not to use one any more. I have about 1/4" of hair now, even not finished with chemo and I'm OK with it. Checked with co-workers and the principal and everyone is in support. I'm in the junior high and if any of the kids ask, I'll answer honestly. One of the other counselors said they might not even ask as now I'm "stylin" We've actually got another teacher whose hair is almost as short by choice. To all the school people out there, hope the 2nd semester is kind to you. Lola
  • kathyDDD
    kathyDDD Member Posts: 34

    Thanks for bumping this up Chen
    I head back to school tomorrow and spent several days debating on whether or not to go "au naturale". It's so hot (yes, I know you midwesters and easterners are jealous) and muggy here in Hawaii right now and I haven't used a scarf, wig or hat the entire winter break. I have decided not to use one any more. I have about 1/4" of hair now, even not finished with chemo and I'm OK with it. Checked with co-workers and the principal and everyone is in support. I'm in the junior high and if any of the kids ask, I'll answer honestly. One of the other counselors said they might not even ask as now I'm "stylin" We've actually got another teacher whose hair is almost as short by choice. To all the school people out there, hope the 2nd semester is kind to you. Lola

    I too am a teacher
    I have been teaching high school math for 27 years. Last year was my first year teaching 7th grade accelerated students plus pre-calc and calc students. I was honest with all of my students and their parents right from the start. They were incredibly supportive. My school raised $5000 last year for Susan G. Komen in honor of me. My classes got to pick which wig I would wear the next week. My calc class actually sent me two wigs as a gift. I started this school year by leaving every day during my planning periods for 38 radiation treatments. My school proclaimed Oct. 21 "Kathy Ferris" day in honr of my last treatment. I thought I was done. My hair had come back and my treatments were done. However, I have started chemo again because some of the cancer cells have moved to the bones in my back, not uncommon. Again, my kids and school are right behind me. From last Thursday to last night, my hair has left me once again. Today was my first day with a new wig. My students have been absolutely phenomenal and supportive. 4 of my calculus girls got their hair cut over xmas break and donated their hair to Locks of Love in my name. Many of my 7th grade parents have told me that I am teaching their children how to face adversity head on with dignity. One mother said "...you are showing that there is nothing to be ashamed of and in the future should (name) ever face this, she will remember how you faced this. Thank you for a life lesson that will make her a better person. God bless you..." Many say I have a great attitude. I say I just have plain Lebanese stubbornness. The support system you create can be as powerful as the medicine we receive. May all of you have a wonderful second semester.

    Take care,
    Kathy
  • MyTurnNow
    MyTurnNow Member Posts: 2,686 Member
    kathyDDD said:

    I too am a teacher
    I have been teaching high school math for 27 years. Last year was my first year teaching 7th grade accelerated students plus pre-calc and calc students. I was honest with all of my students and their parents right from the start. They were incredibly supportive. My school raised $5000 last year for Susan G. Komen in honor of me. My classes got to pick which wig I would wear the next week. My calc class actually sent me two wigs as a gift. I started this school year by leaving every day during my planning periods for 38 radiation treatments. My school proclaimed Oct. 21 "Kathy Ferris" day in honr of my last treatment. I thought I was done. My hair had come back and my treatments were done. However, I have started chemo again because some of the cancer cells have moved to the bones in my back, not uncommon. Again, my kids and school are right behind me. From last Thursday to last night, my hair has left me once again. Today was my first day with a new wig. My students have been absolutely phenomenal and supportive. 4 of my calculus girls got their hair cut over xmas break and donated their hair to Locks of Love in my name. Many of my 7th grade parents have told me that I am teaching their children how to face adversity head on with dignity. One mother said "...you are showing that there is nothing to be ashamed of and in the future should (name) ever face this, she will remember how you faced this. Thank you for a life lesson that will make her a better person. God bless you..." Many say I have a great attitude. I say I just have plain Lebanese stubbornness. The support system you create can be as powerful as the medicine we receive. May all of you have a wonderful second semester.

    Take care,
    Kathy

    Kathy, what a wonderful
    Kathy, what a wonderful "Lebanese stubbornness" you have. You are inspiration to those of us making our way through this journey. Thank YOU!
  • LC815
    LC815 Member Posts: 155
    kathyDDD said:

    I too am a teacher
    I have been teaching high school math for 27 years. Last year was my first year teaching 7th grade accelerated students plus pre-calc and calc students. I was honest with all of my students and their parents right from the start. They were incredibly supportive. My school raised $5000 last year for Susan G. Komen in honor of me. My classes got to pick which wig I would wear the next week. My calc class actually sent me two wigs as a gift. I started this school year by leaving every day during my planning periods for 38 radiation treatments. My school proclaimed Oct. 21 "Kathy Ferris" day in honr of my last treatment. I thought I was done. My hair had come back and my treatments were done. However, I have started chemo again because some of the cancer cells have moved to the bones in my back, not uncommon. Again, my kids and school are right behind me. From last Thursday to last night, my hair has left me once again. Today was my first day with a new wig. My students have been absolutely phenomenal and supportive. 4 of my calculus girls got their hair cut over xmas break and donated their hair to Locks of Love in my name. Many of my 7th grade parents have told me that I am teaching their children how to face adversity head on with dignity. One mother said "...you are showing that there is nothing to be ashamed of and in the future should (name) ever face this, she will remember how you faced this. Thank you for a life lesson that will make her a better person. God bless you..." Many say I have a great attitude. I say I just have plain Lebanese stubbornness. The support system you create can be as powerful as the medicine we receive. May all of you have a wonderful second semester.

    Take care,
    Kathy

    Thanks Chen and Kathy!
    I was the one that recently asked about teaching. I told my department today that it was on to chemo for me and I admit, I shed a few tears. I plan on calling all my students together and telling them at once. I don't think I could get through giving the talk to seven classes. I'm just going to make sure I take an Ativan, because I didn't today and I was verrrry anxious and teary. I think I'm going to get them all together next Monday. One of my fellow teachers said, "We can be there with you if you want. You don't have to do this by yourself." How wonderful.
  • kathyDDD
    kathyDDD Member Posts: 34
    LC815 said:

    Thanks Chen and Kathy!
    I was the one that recently asked about teaching. I told my department today that it was on to chemo for me and I admit, I shed a few tears. I plan on calling all my students together and telling them at once. I don't think I could get through giving the talk to seven classes. I'm just going to make sure I take an Ativan, because I didn't today and I was verrrry anxious and teary. I think I'm going to get them all together next Monday. One of my fellow teachers said, "We can be there with you if you want. You don't have to do this by yourself." How wonderful.

    I truly believe
    I truly believe you are making the right decision. Your students will respect the fact that you trust them enough to share this with them. The support and love they will shower upon you will be fabulous. Sometimes, as teachers, we truly never know the real impact we have on our students. If we are fortunate enough, sometimes we find out through different paths. Although this is a path we would rather not have crossed, we get a chance to see one of the main reasons why we chose this profession. Don't be afraid of the tears and let those around you help. I had the hardest time accepting help, but I now know it's the right thing to do. I'll be thinking of you on Monday and sending you strong vibes and a cyber-space big hug. Like the coffe cup says, "Teaching is a work of heart." You are going to be a fantastic role model for your students and colleagues alike. Please let me know how it goes, either through this site, or my email [email protected]

    Best Wishes for a Safe Journey,
    Kathy