Can we do a ROLL CALL with everyone posting their name, cancer diagnosis, & where they are in treatm

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  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471

    Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy
    Hi Lisa,
    My name is David and I am a caregiver for my wife who had a total hysterectomy, went through 6 chemotherapies and now is experiencing Neuropathy symptoms in her fore arms which were the injection sites for the chemotherapy. Have you experienced any of those symptoms?
    Sorry I see you have had radiation. However, we are in the same boat. If you are on FaceBook there is a Uterine Cancer site there also, people looking for information.
    My wife had Uterine Cancer Stage 1, diagnosed on 9 Sept. 2009, operation on 21 Sept. 2009
    During that operation a "Wash" was performed before any internal organs were removed and that was sent to the lab and the hysterectomy was vaginally extracted. Nodes were clean, the Uterus was loaded stage 1a less than 50% through the wall. The rest was clean. The "Wash" was Papillary Serous Adenocarcinoma of Endometrium Stage 3. 6 Chemotherapy session were successfully completed. However she started experiencing very tender to the touch on both of her forearms and cannot wear any watch or bracelets. Her last treatment was 1-19-2010 and it is now 2-7-2010 which is about 3 weeks. We have heard the word Neuropathy and put no creadance on it until we heard a lady mention that she was suffering from Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy. I have done searches on that and it definitely does exist. The big question is what can be done about it.
    Regards,
    David

    Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy: How to Minimize and Treat

    Dear David,

    Long fearing peripheral neuropathy as a side effect of my current regime (taxol/carboplatin), I did quite a bit of online research and found some useful information.

    Apparently, as even experts from the Mayo Clinic admit, PN is easier to prevent than to treat--although treatment via natural supplements is promising, with far fewer side effects than those often generated by pharmaceuticals such as Neurontin.

    To prevent, or minimize, I was advised by a well-credentialed complementary doctor to do the following:

    Take a teaspoon of glutamine (an amino acid) in a glass of water three times day. Start the day before chemo and continue during the first three days of chemo.

    Be sure my level of vitamin D is at between 30 and 45 (I get my blood checked once a month) and if lower than 30, take 2 to 4 drops of Liqui-D (available online), a highly absorbable form of D3, a day. If taking more than 2 drops a day, best done under doctor's care and only for two to three months until levels come up to where they should be.

    Likewise be sure my level of B-12 is at least 500 before starting chemo. Normal range is 200-900, but 500 or more is what you want before chemo because B-12 is one of the catalysts for bone marrow production: healthy red and white cells, and too little B-12 compounds your chances of developing PN. (I try not to wince when I hear the chemo nurse explaining again and again to patients in the waiting room, "we have to postpone your treatment because your platelets are low." Yet how many oncologists CHECK your levels of B-12 before you start treatment?

    Take 3 teaspoons of high-quality fish oil a day; the brand recommended was "Finest Pure Fish Oil" by Pharmax. No bad flavor at all; I don't even need to put it in juice.

    Of course most oncologists (often with good reason, often with poor reason) tell us not to take ANY supplements during chemo beyond a multivitamin. (the one recommended for me, by the way, is Formula 950, which has no iron or copper, both elements that, according to some recent research, may stimulate tumor growth. (The kind of iron we absorb from vegetable sources isn't harmful, by the way; it's the form we get from red meats and food supplements that can apparently stimulate cancer cells--at least according to some recent research. That's why I was advised to take Formula 950: two, three times a day before starting chemo but while on chemo only two a day, total--lest I ingest too many antioxidants that conceivably could interfere with the efficacy of chemo.

    Despite these caveats, several impressive books by Dr. Russell Blaylock (Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients), James Qulllen (Beating Cancer with Nutrition) and Michael Murray (once resident nutritionist for Cancer Treatment Centers of America) all recommend 400 mgs per day of Vitamin E succinate (the dry form o Vitamin E) to minimize peripheral neuropathy; they recommend starting it a week to two before chemo and contiuing throughout the course of chemo, citing clinical studies that show that it mitigates several side effects of chemo and actually enhances the effectiveness of most chemo.

    Having taken the preceding as directed, i have not so far--knock on wood--had any symptoms of PN although admittedly am just finishing my third round of it.


    ONCE YOU HAVE PN:

    There are clinical studies suggesting that alpha-lipoic acid (about 600 mgs a day; start with 300 and build up) can slowly reverse symptoms of PN.

    A product called "Nerve Support Formula" touting the importance of a derivative of vitamin B-1, coupled with another B vitamin, has helped thousands to slowly reverse troublin symptoms of PN.

    Yet other studies show that daily capsules of Evening Primrose Oil (or borage oil) further help to repair nerve damage.

    A final suggestion: One of the best web sites I've found on supplements useful for PN is Life Extension. Granted, they sell supplements, and usually I'm skeptical of advice that comes from any commercial (.com) site. However, their board of advisors (check them out) are very impressive; leading doctors and researchers have created a clinically-based web site with recent research on various nutrients. You needn't even buy their products to access their web site and get their free reports.

    Best in our shared ongoing challenge to cope with traditional cancer therapies.

    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471

    Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy
    Hi Lisa,
    My name is David and I am a caregiver for my wife who had a total hysterectomy, went through 6 chemotherapies and now is experiencing Neuropathy symptoms in her fore arms which were the injection sites for the chemotherapy. Have you experienced any of those symptoms?
    Sorry I see you have had radiation. However, we are in the same boat. If you are on FaceBook there is a Uterine Cancer site there also, people looking for information.
    My wife had Uterine Cancer Stage 1, diagnosed on 9 Sept. 2009, operation on 21 Sept. 2009
    During that operation a "Wash" was performed before any internal organs were removed and that was sent to the lab and the hysterectomy was vaginally extracted. Nodes were clean, the Uterus was loaded stage 1a less than 50% through the wall. The rest was clean. The "Wash" was Papillary Serous Adenocarcinoma of Endometrium Stage 3. 6 Chemotherapy session were successfully completed. However she started experiencing very tender to the touch on both of her forearms and cannot wear any watch or bracelets. Her last treatment was 1-19-2010 and it is now 2-7-2010 which is about 3 weeks. We have heard the word Neuropathy and put no creadance on it until we heard a lady mention that she was suffering from Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy. I have done searches on that and it definitely does exist. The big question is what can be done about it.
    Regards,
    David

    Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy: How to Minimize and Treat

    Dear David,

    Long fearing peripheral neuropathy as a side effect of my current regime (taxol/carboplatin), I did quite a bit of online research and found some useful information.

    Apparently, as even experts from the Mayo Clinic admit, PN is easier to prevent than to treat--although treatment via natural supplements is promising, with far fewer side effects than those often generated by pharmaceuticals such as Neurontin.

    To prevent, or minimize, I was advised by a well-credentialed complementary doctor to do the following:

    Take a teaspoon of glutamine (an amino acid) in a glass of water three times day. Start the day before chemo and continue during the first three days of chemo.

    Be sure my level of vitamin D is at between 30 and 45 (I get my blood checked once a month) and if lower than 30, take 2 to 4 drops of Liqui-D (available online), a highly absorbable form of D3, a day. If taking more than 2 drops a day, best done under doctor's care and only for two to three months until levels come up to where they should be.

    Likewise be sure my level of B-12 is at least 500 before starting chemo. Normal range is 200-900, but 500 or more is what you want before chemo because B-12 is one of the catalysts for bone marrow production: healthy red and white cells, and too little B-12 compounds your chances of developing PN. (I try not to wince when I hear the chemo nurse explaining again and again to patients in the waiting room, "we have to postpone your treatment because your platelets are low." Yet how many oncologists CHECK your levels of B-12 before you start treatment?

    Take 3 teaspoons of high-quality fish oil a day; the brand recommended was "Finest Pure Fish Oil" by Pharmax. No bad flavor at all; I don't even need to put it in juice.

    Of course most oncologists (often with good reason, often with poor reason) tell us not to take ANY supplements during chemo beyond a multivitamin. (the one recommended for me, by the way, is Formula 950, which has no iron or copper, both elements that, according to some recent research, may stimulate tumor growth. (The kind of iron we absorb from vegetable sources isn't harmful, by the way; it's the form we get from red meats and food supplements that can apparently stimulate cancer cells--at least according to some recent research. That's why I was advised to take Formula 950: two, three times a day before starting chemo but while on chemo only two a day, total--lest I ingest too many antioxidants that conceivably could interfere with the efficacy of chemo.

    Despite these caveats, several impressive books by Dr. Russell Blaylock (Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients), James Qulllen (Beating Cancer with Nutrition) and Michael Murray (once resident nutritionist for Cancer Treatment Centers of America) all recommend 400 mgs per day of Vitamin E succinate (the dry form o Vitamin E) to minimize peripheral neuropathy; they recommend starting it a week to two before chemo and contiuing throughout the course of chemo, citing clinical studies that show that it mitigates several side effects of chemo and actually enhances the effectiveness of most chemo.

    Having taken the preceding as directed, i have not so far--knock on wood--had any symptoms of PN although admittedly am just finishing my third round of it.


    ONCE YOU HAVE PN:

    There are clinical studies suggesting that alpha-lipoic acid (about 600 mgs a day; start with 300 and build up) can slowly reverse symptoms of PN.

    A product called "Nerve Support Formula" touting the importance of a derivative of vitamin B-1, coupled with another B vitamin, has helped thousands to slowly reverse troublin symptoms of PN.

    Yet other studies show that daily capsules of Evening Primrose Oil (or borage oil) further help to repair nerve damage.

    A final suggestion: One of the best web sites I've found on supplements useful for PN is Life Extension. Granted, they sell supplements, and usually I'm skeptical of advice that comes from any commercial (.com) site. However, their board of advisors (check them out) are very impressive; leading doctors and researchers have created a clinically-based web site with recent research on various nutrients. You needn't even buy their products to access their web site and get their free reports.

    Best in our shared ongoing challenge to cope with traditional cancer therapies.

    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471

    Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy
    Hi Lisa,
    My name is David and I am a caregiver for my wife who had a total hysterectomy, went through 6 chemotherapies and now is experiencing Neuropathy symptoms in her fore arms which were the injection sites for the chemotherapy. Have you experienced any of those symptoms?
    Sorry I see you have had radiation. However, we are in the same boat. If you are on FaceBook there is a Uterine Cancer site there also, people looking for information.
    My wife had Uterine Cancer Stage 1, diagnosed on 9 Sept. 2009, operation on 21 Sept. 2009
    During that operation a "Wash" was performed before any internal organs were removed and that was sent to the lab and the hysterectomy was vaginally extracted. Nodes were clean, the Uterus was loaded stage 1a less than 50% through the wall. The rest was clean. The "Wash" was Papillary Serous Adenocarcinoma of Endometrium Stage 3. 6 Chemotherapy session were successfully completed. However she started experiencing very tender to the touch on both of her forearms and cannot wear any watch or bracelets. Her last treatment was 1-19-2010 and it is now 2-7-2010 which is about 3 weeks. We have heard the word Neuropathy and put no creadance on it until we heard a lady mention that she was suffering from Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy. I have done searches on that and it definitely does exist. The big question is what can be done about it.
    Regards,
    David

    Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy: How to Minimize and Treat

    Dear David,

    Long fearing peripheral neuropathy as a side effect of my current regime (taxol/carboplatin), I did quite a bit of online research and found some useful information.

    Apparently, as even experts from the Mayo Clinic admit, PN is easier to prevent than to treat--although treatment via natural supplements is promising, with far fewer side effects than those often generated by pharmaceuticals such as Neurontin.

    To prevent, or minimize, I was advised by a well-credentialed complementary doctor to do the following:

    Take a teaspoon of glutamine (an amino acid) in a glass of water three times day. Start the day before chemo and continue during the first three days of chemo.

    Be sure my level of vitamin D is at between 30 and 45 (I get my blood checked once a month) and if lower than 30, take 2 to 4 drops of Liqui-D (available online), a highly absorbable form of D3, a day. If taking more than 2 drops a day, best done under doctor's care and only for two to three months until levels come up to where they should be.

    Likewise be sure my level of B-12 is at least 500 before starting chemo. Normal range is 200-900, but 500 or more is what you want before chemo because B-12 is one of the catalysts for bone marrow production: healthy red and white cells, and too little B-12 compounds your chances of developing PN. (I try not to wince when I hear the chemo nurse explaining again and again to patients in the waiting room, "we have to postpone your treatment because your platelets are low." Yet how many oncologists CHECK your levels of B-12 before you start treatment?

    Take 3 teaspoons of high-quality fish oil a day; the brand recommended was "Finest Pure Fish Oil" by Pharmax. No bad flavor at all; I don't even need to put it in juice.

    Of course most oncologists (often with good reason, often with poor reason) tell us not to take ANY supplements during chemo beyond a multivitamin. (the one recommended for me, by the way, is Formula 950, which has no iron or copper, both elements that, according to some recent research, may stimulate tumor growth. (The kind of iron we absorb from vegetable sources isn't harmful, by the way; it's the form we get from red meats and food supplements that can apparently stimulate cancer cells--at least according to some recent research. That's why I was advised to take Formula 950: two, three times a day before starting chemo but while on chemo only two a day, total--lest I ingest too many antioxidants that conceivably could interfere with the efficacy of chemo.

    Despite these caveats, several impressive books by Dr. Russell Blaylock (Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients), James Qulllen (Beating Cancer with Nutrition) and Michael Murray (once resident nutritionist for Cancer Treatment Centers of America) all recommend 400 mgs per day of Vitamin E succinate (the dry form o Vitamin E) to minimize peripheral neuropathy; they recommend starting it a week to two before chemo and contiuing throughout the course of chemo, citing clinical studies that show that it mitigates several side effects of chemo and actually enhances the effectiveness of most chemo.

    Having taken the preceding as directed, i have not so far--knock on wood--had any symptoms of PN although admittedly am just finishing my third round of it.


    ONCE YOU HAVE PN:

    There are clinical studies suggesting that alpha-lipoic acid (about 600 mgs a day; start with 300 and build up) can slowly reverse symptoms of PN.

    A product called "Nerve Support Formula" touting the importance of a derivative of vitamin B-1, coupled with another B vitamin, has helped thousands to slowly reverse troublin symptoms of PN.

    Yet other studies show that daily capsules of Evening Primrose Oil (or borage oil) further help to repair nerve damage.

    A final suggestion: One of the best web sites I've found on supplements useful for PN is Life Extension. Granted, they sell supplements, and usually I'm skeptical of advice that comes from any commercial (.com) site. However, their board of advisors (check them out) are very impressive; leading doctors and researchers have created a clinically-based web site with recent research on various nutrients. You needn't even buy their products to access their web site and get their free reports.

    Best in our shared ongoing challenge to cope with traditional cancer therapies.

    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471

    Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy
    Hi Lisa,
    My name is David and I am a caregiver for my wife who had a total hysterectomy, went through 6 chemotherapies and now is experiencing Neuropathy symptoms in her fore arms which were the injection sites for the chemotherapy. Have you experienced any of those symptoms?
    Sorry I see you have had radiation. However, we are in the same boat. If you are on FaceBook there is a Uterine Cancer site there also, people looking for information.
    My wife had Uterine Cancer Stage 1, diagnosed on 9 Sept. 2009, operation on 21 Sept. 2009
    During that operation a "Wash" was performed before any internal organs were removed and that was sent to the lab and the hysterectomy was vaginally extracted. Nodes were clean, the Uterus was loaded stage 1a less than 50% through the wall. The rest was clean. The "Wash" was Papillary Serous Adenocarcinoma of Endometrium Stage 3. 6 Chemotherapy session were successfully completed. However she started experiencing very tender to the touch on both of her forearms and cannot wear any watch or bracelets. Her last treatment was 1-19-2010 and it is now 2-7-2010 which is about 3 weeks. We have heard the word Neuropathy and put no creadance on it until we heard a lady mention that she was suffering from Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy. I have done searches on that and it definitely does exist. The big question is what can be done about it.
    Regards,
    David

    Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy: How to Minimize and Treat

    Dear David,

    Long fearing peripheral neuropathy as a side effect of my current regime (taxol/carboplatin), I did quite a bit of online research and found some useful information.

    Apparently, as even experts from the Mayo Clinic admit, PN is easier to prevent than to treat--although treatment via natural supplements is promising, with far fewer side effects than those often generated by pharmaceuticals such as Neurontin.

    To prevent, or minimize, I was advised by a well-credentialed complementary doctor to do the following:

    Take a teaspoon of glutamine (an amino acid) in a glass of water three times day. Start the day before chemo and continue during the first three days of chemo.

    Be sure my level of vitamin D is at between 30 and 45 (I get my blood checked once a month) and if lower than 30, take 2 to 4 drops of Liqui-D (available online), a highly absorbable form of D3, a day. If taking more than 2 drops a day, best done under doctor's care and only for two to three months until levels come up to where they should be.

    Likewise be sure my level of B-12 is at least 500 before starting chemo. Normal range is 200-900, but 500 or more is what you want before chemo because B-12 is one of the catalysts for bone marrow production: healthy red and white cells, and too little B-12 compounds your chances of developing PN. (I try not to wince when I hear the chemo nurse explaining again and again to patients in the waiting room, "we have to postpone your treatment because your platelets are low." Yet how many oncologists CHECK your levels of B-12 before you start treatment?

    Take 3 teaspoons of high-quality fish oil a day; the brand recommended was "Finest Pure Fish Oil" by Pharmax. No bad flavor at all; I don't even need to put it in juice.

    Of course most oncologists (often with good reason, often with poor reason) tell us not to take ANY supplements during chemo beyond a multivitamin. (the one recommended for me, by the way, is Formula 950, which has no iron or copper, both elements that, according to some recent research, may stimulate tumor growth. (The kind of iron we absorb from vegetable sources isn't harmful, by the way; it's the form we get from red meats and food supplements that can apparently stimulate cancer cells--at least according to some recent research. That's why I was advised to take Formula 950: two, three times a day before starting chemo but while on chemo only two a day, total--lest I ingest too many antioxidants that conceivably could interfere with the efficacy of chemo.

    Despite these caveats, several impressive books by Dr. Russell Blaylock (Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients), James Qulllen (Beating Cancer with Nutrition) and Michael Murray (once resident nutritionist for Cancer Treatment Centers of America) all recommend 400 mgs per day of Vitamin E succinate (the dry form o Vitamin E) to minimize peripheral neuropathy; they recommend starting it a week to two before chemo and contiuing throughout the course of chemo, citing clinical studies that show that it mitigates several side effects of chemo and actually enhances the effectiveness of most chemo.

    Having taken the preceding as directed, i have not so far--knock on wood--had any symptoms of PN although admittedly am just finishing my third round of it.


    ONCE YOU HAVE PN:

    There are clinical studies suggesting that alpha-lipoic acid (about 600 mgs a day; start with 300 and build up) can slowly reverse symptoms of PN.

    A product called "Nerve Support Formula" touting the importance of a derivative of vitamin B-1, coupled with another B vitamin, has helped thousands to slowly reverse troublin symptoms of PN.

    Yet other studies show that daily capsules of Evening Primrose Oil (or borage oil) further help to repair nerve damage.

    A final suggestion: One of the best web sites I've found on supplements useful for PN is Life Extension. Granted, they sell supplements, and usually I'm skeptical of advice that comes from any commercial (.com) site. However, their board of advisors (check them out) are very impressive; leading doctors and researchers have created a clinically-based web site with recent research on various nutrients. You needn't even buy their products to access their web site and get their free reports.

    Best in our shared ongoing challenge to cope with traditional cancer therapies.

    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471

    Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy
    Hi Lisa,
    My name is David and I am a caregiver for my wife who had a total hysterectomy, went through 6 chemotherapies and now is experiencing Neuropathy symptoms in her fore arms which were the injection sites for the chemotherapy. Have you experienced any of those symptoms?
    Sorry I see you have had radiation. However, we are in the same boat. If you are on FaceBook there is a Uterine Cancer site there also, people looking for information.
    My wife had Uterine Cancer Stage 1, diagnosed on 9 Sept. 2009, operation on 21 Sept. 2009
    During that operation a "Wash" was performed before any internal organs were removed and that was sent to the lab and the hysterectomy was vaginally extracted. Nodes were clean, the Uterus was loaded stage 1a less than 50% through the wall. The rest was clean. The "Wash" was Papillary Serous Adenocarcinoma of Endometrium Stage 3. 6 Chemotherapy session were successfully completed. However she started experiencing very tender to the touch on both of her forearms and cannot wear any watch or bracelets. Her last treatment was 1-19-2010 and it is now 2-7-2010 which is about 3 weeks. We have heard the word Neuropathy and put no creadance on it until we heard a lady mention that she was suffering from Chemotherapy induced Neuropathy. I have done searches on that and it definitely does exist. The big question is what can be done about it.
    Regards,
    David

    Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy: How to Minimize and Treat

    Dear David,

    Long fearing peripheral neuropathy as a side effect of my current regime (taxol/carboplatin), I did quite a bit of online research and found some useful information.

    Apparently, as even experts from the Mayo Clinic admit, PN is easier to prevent than to treat--although treatment via natural supplements is promising, with far fewer side effects than those often generated by pharmaceuticals such as Neurontin.

    To prevent, or minimize, I was advised by a well-credentialed complementary doctor to do the following:

    Take a teaspoon of glutamine (an amino acid) in a glass of water three times day. Start the day before chemo and continue during the first three days of chemo.

    Be sure my level of vitamin D is at between 30 and 45 (I get my blood checked once a month) and if lower than 30, take 2 to 4 drops of Liqui-D (available online), a highly absorbable form of D3, a day. If taking more than 2 drops a day, best done under doctor's care and only for two to three months until levels come up to where they should be.

    Likewise be sure my level of B-12 is at least 500 before starting chemo. Normal range is 200-900, but 500 or more is what you want before chemo because B-12 is one of the catalysts for bone marrow production: healthy red and white cells, and too little B-12 compounds your chances of developing PN. (I try not to wince when I hear the chemo nurse explaining again and again to patients in the waiting room, "we have to postpone your treatment because your platelets are low." Yet how many oncologists CHECK your levels of B-12 before you start treatment?

    Take 3 teaspoons of high-quality fish oil a day; the brand recommended was "Finest Pure Fish Oil" by Pharmax. No bad flavor at all; I don't even need to put it in juice.

    Of course most oncologists (often with good reason, often with poor reason) tell us not to take ANY supplements during chemo beyond a multivitamin. (the one recommended for me, by the way, is Formula 950, which has no iron or copper, both elements that, according to some recent research, may stimulate tumor growth. (The kind of iron we absorb from vegetable sources isn't harmful, by the way; it's the form we get from red meats and food supplements that can apparently stimulate cancer cells--at least according to some recent research. That's why I was advised to take Formula 950: two, three times a day before starting chemo but while on chemo only two a day, total--lest I ingest too many antioxidants that conceivably could interfere with the efficacy of chemo.

    Despite these caveats, several impressive books by Dr. Russell Blaylock (Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients), James Qulllen (Beating Cancer with Nutrition) and Michael Murray (once resident nutritionist for Cancer Treatment Centers of America) all recommend 400 mgs per day of Vitamin E succinate (the dry form o Vitamin E) to minimize peripheral neuropathy; they recommend starting it a week to two before chemo and contiuing throughout the course of chemo, citing clinical studies that show that it mitigates several side effects of chemo and actually enhances the effectiveness of most chemo.

    Having taken the preceding as directed, i have not so far--knock on wood--had any symptoms of PN although admittedly am just finishing my third round of it.


    ONCE YOU HAVE PN:

    There are clinical studies suggesting that alpha-lipoic acid (about 600 mgs a day; start with 300 and build up) can slowly reverse symptoms of PN.

    A product called "Nerve Support Formula" touting the importance of a derivative of vitamin B-1, coupled with another B vitamin, has helped thousands to slowly reverse troublin symptoms of PN.

    Yet other studies show that daily capsules of Evening Primrose Oil (or borage oil) further help to repair nerve damage.

    A final suggestion: One of the best web sites I've found on supplements useful for PN is Life Extension. Granted, they sell supplements, and usually I'm skeptical of advice that comes from any commercial (.com) site. However, their board of advisors (check them out) are very impressive; leading doctors and researchers have created a clinically-based web site with recent research on various nutrients. You needn't even buy their products to access their web site and get their free reports.

    Best in our shared ongoing challenge to cope with traditional cancer therapies.

    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    bonniesue said:

    again concerns over my mom- nurse lisa and those with this
    I know you have responded in the past, but I am still anxious and I think you have about the same as my mom--Grade 1 stage 1C or 2B depending on which path report I look at and plus or minus lymphovascular invasion. Neg pelvic nodes and washings but only six pelvic lymph nodes taken. My concern is still that some are recommending just brachtherapy and some both. One plan was 27 txs of IMRT and two brachy so 4800 dose of rad plus brachy to add to 6000 as I understood it. My mom has started with this but I again am worried she will have bad complications like fistulas or small bowel problems and even though she is otherwise healthy(still working) very social she is 71 yo. These different recommendations come even as a difference within the rad. oncs and even between gyne oncs. I do not want a complication nor recurrence but it sounds like pelvic rad can give up to 5-15% complication rate. any advice?? my mom will be compliant and just feels frustrated and worried which is not helping her recovery and she was up post op day 1 and home after the robotic-- told all was well and then got the news two weeks later that the path report was more invasive which caused a frenzy of us getting other thoughts and opinions which takes a lot of time which cuts into your treatment and makes you jump to a decision. thanks bonnie

    How MUCH radiation does your mom really need?

    Dear Bonnie Sue,

    I really empathize with your indecision because, the fact is, even leading radiological oncologists often don't agree on how much radiation is optimal for particular kinds of endometrial cancer, especially those that fall into the stage IB to IIA and that are, at the same time, grade 3 or very aggressive.

    I had three different opinions in Philadelphia on how much radiation I need, in a few weeks, for MMMT (a very aggressive tumor) that is stage 1B with 18 clear pelvic lymph nodes and so sign of spread yet. My treating radiologist wants me to do full pelvic (IMRT) radiation for five weeks daily, followed by ("if you are up to it") three rounds of brachytherapy. Obviously both would minimize any chance of local recurrence. But neither, research shows, would much help overall survival since it is distant spread that proves to be fatal. Brachy makes sense to prevent recurrence in the vaginal cuff, where 70 percent of LOCal recurrences appear in my kind of tumor. And huge recent studies called Portec 1 and 2, conducted in the Netherlands, and cited by one oncologist I consulted, conclude that for unaggressive grades of endometrial cancer such as yours, stage IB, brachtherapy is just as effective at controlling local recurrences as EBRT--with far fewer side effects. (Have you googled Portec 1 and Portec 2? There are many summaries of its conclusions.) I can hardly advise you what to do, but you might look at these large and well-documented studies.

    I too am a little leery of all the side effects I read of from women who uderwent EBRT or even IMRT (a form of pelvic radiation that softens many of the immediate side effects of EBRT but that, I have read, may produce nearly as many "late onset" effects such as aching pelvic bones and even hip fractures a year to two later. (Sisters, could I hear from any of you who FINISHED either EBRT or IMRT pelvic radiation more than a year ago? How many of you had diahrrea for more than two months? Aching hips and legs? Even hip fractures? Did any of you "sail through it' nearly unscathed a year to two later--even followed by brachytherapy?

    My tendency is to choose just brachtherapy followed by last round of taxol/carboplatin. Yes, a local recurrence in my pelvis would be a bit traumatic. But is its small additonal protection (EBRT is only 13% more effective in controlling general pelvic recurrence than brachytherapy; the latter is even better, nearly 100 percent effective, in conrolling vaginal recurrence) worth the side effects I fear from full-pelvic radiation?

    Hoping to hear from other,
    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    daisy366 said:

    no neuropathy??
    Are you saying you had no neuropathy?? That is so great!! Did you have taxol? I think that's the one that causes the neuropathy. I wish my doc recommended L-glutamine. He just told me about B12- which I think did nothing.

    Hopefully I will not have to use it, but I will remember this info if I have to have chemo again. Best wishes to you. I hope you are NED!!!

    Mary Ann

    Preventing and Treating Neuropathy

    Dear Mary Ann and Dave,

    New to this wonderful site, I posted earlier today a lot of information on preventing and treating chemo-induced neuropathy. Glutamine is--you are right--a superb supplement, one of several that can help.

    Apologies to all that today's message on neuropathy somehow got posted four times in a row; i must learn how not to let that happen!

    Warmly,
    Rosey R
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    bea-mil said:

    My story
    In 2001 after regular pop smear test, but LEEP and D&C have not confirmed that then. I had to wait 9 years and run more tests (pop smears, Ultrasounds, colposcopies, biopsies, MRI's etc. for my cancer to be confirmed in March 2010. The bleading between the periods that I had all the time was taken as a symptom of my uterine fibroids. Other symptoms -changes in bowel pattern - were misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrom.
    My cancer was staged as 1B and upstage by another pathologist (oncology clinic) to 3A grade 1/2. The cancer had spread to the outer lining of the uterus, but not to other organs.

    I had total hysterectomy March 23rd, 2010(including the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries and cervix). No lymph nodes were taken. My surgery was performed by my gynecologist (not oncologist). My radiation therapy sessions were scheduled for July 12th 2010. I had my simulation planning session, got my little tattoos, and have decided to stop the conventional treatments at this point.
    My treatment now: healthy diet, exercise, meditation, change of way of thinking, plus alternative approach (reiki, Gerson's, Budwig's therapies and more).

    I believe that everything has its purpose and even the worst thing (like cancer) can lead to something good. In my case to my surprise this terrible illness gave me calm and peace and understanding towards others than I’ve ever had. I feel that I’m totally new person. I will do everything (natural way) to get better and live long my new life; I believe that God gave us everything on this earth to stay healthy and happy. We just have to learn how to benefit from that.

    Dear Bea-Mil,

    Curiously, despite a recent diagnosis of an aggressive uterine cancer that usually has poor prognosis (MMMT, stage IB, with no signs yet of metastasis), and only 50/50 chance of surviving five years, even after chemo and radiation, I have felt a newfound calm that I've never known before.

    Of course I had a few bad days when I started reading articles online about the aggressive nature of this cancer (possibly a bit worse than even serous forms).

    My worst moments concerned breaking the poor prognosis to my mother, who is 91 and in good health; I am her only daughter and although she has two sons, I am her major emotional support; we talk every day by phone and I spend every other weekend with her.

    Hating to frighten or depress family and close friends, I haven't shared the prognosis with anyone! All they know is that I needed a hysterectomy to remove a cancerous tumor and that to help prevent recurrence, I need follow-up chemo and radiation. They probably assume recurrence in five to ten years--not the one to two that often typify this cancer!

    Other than trepdiation about sharing the prognosis with family (at her age, my mother COULD die before I do, so why depress her with a grim prognosis? I'd rather not share it until and unless I have a serious recurrence (to lungs or liver), in which case of course I would tell her I might not have much time left. Nor do I want to see my two kid brothers look at me every moment with fear and pity; did anyone else struggle with this issue? I COULD share prognosis with a few close friends from work (a small group I often socialize with, who are great) but fear I'd be defined primarily by my disease--and be seen as a "walking death bomb," inciting sadness and depression even among close friends who might, being human, prefer to avoid my company too often because, being human, a poor prognosis would cut too close to home: reminding them of their own mortality. Well do I understand such reactions; I could even forgive them. As long as they know merely that I have uterine cancer and am in extensive treatment to avoid recurrence, I feel that's enough, and knowing this, they have been very supportive. I'd like to hear from anyone else who has struggled with this issue: how MUCH to tell family and friends.

    Other than THIS issue, I am at peace most of the time: feeling that if I live even another 3-5 years, that's OK; I don't think I am afraid of dying. Like most, I'm hardly heroic in wanting to avoid too much suffering along the way; quality of life often seems more important to me than mere longevity.

    So other than a few bad days--the worst incited by conflicts about how much to tell others--I've felt little panic or depression despite my diagnosis. I feel, curiously, little depression OR panic and now enjoy, with good medical leave, a slowing of my usual rushed pace of life. Of course I will fight to live as long as I can--through major changes in diet and my own online research. But feel curiously calm and centered and able to enjoy many simple pleasures most of the time, even without yoga or meditation. (A dramatic change of diet since diagnosis--NO sugar, NO white flour products, lots of whole grains, beans, green vegetables, only organic chicken and turkey, among other changes, boost of essential fatty acids (Omega 3 via fish oil and flax) may, I suspect, be contributing to my sense of calm; lots of green tea, known to attack cancer cells, also calms the nervous system. And in making such changes, I find NO food cravings for sugar or fried food--just a sense of satisfaction and calm, for finally I am well nourished. In the process, since early September, though it was not my MAIN goal, I have also lost 30 pounds (at age 63, I have gone from 163 to 133, lowering my blood pressure and looking MUCH better in my now loose clothing.)

    One of my greatest satisfactions has een reading books on cancer and nutrition that are optimistic, giving me some sense of elements I can control despite the harrowing nature of the disease. If you can read only one, I'd recommend Anti-Cancer, by a pyschiatrist and Ph.D in science who twice surmounted brain cancer partly through nutritional changes based on fifteen years of research. The next best one I've read is Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients by Dr. Russell Blaylock.

    So am glad to hear you have found a curious sense of peace since diagnosis and wanted to share a few reasons I can relate to it. In short, I feel OK about the chance that I may live just a few more years and have already started to put some, not all, "affairs in order." Yet I am not giving up, either, the attempt to be one of the few who survives five to ten years with this diagnosis. I am otherwise very healthy (few colds, no allergies, no other syndromes) and feel GREAT, both physically and mentally after three rounds of carbo/taxol; have had virtually no side effects except oaccasional fatigue, along the way.

    Merely need to reconcile how much--and how soon-- to tell family about the usual prognosis for this uterine cancer.
    As long as they can look at me with hope and optimism, the longer I see myself reflected in their eyes as "the usual Rosey," just one who needs a lot of treatment to avoid recurrence.

    Warmly to all of you,
    RoseyR
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    susafina said:

    Hope it is not too late to join roll call
    Hi Everyone,
    I have learned so much allready from all of you and received so much support fromm all of you that I figured it is about time I introduce myself. My name is SUE and I just celebrated my 54th birthday. I was diagnosed in November of 2009. I had surgery that month and was staged as Grade 1 cell at stage IIIC. I just completed full pelvic radiation with a Cisplatnim chaser followed by four cycles of Carb/Taxol. I remain with peripheral neuropathies of my hands and feet (not fun). I had my first post treatment CT which I reported to all of you and I am dancing with NED.
    Now I want to focus on feeling better and get healthy!! I really appreciate all of your suggestions and am learning so much from all of you. If I had to be in this club I count myself lucky to have met incredible, sweet and caring members!
    SUE

    PS I hate being bald!!

    Peripheral Neuropathy and your "cisplatin chaser"


    Dear Sue,

    I'm new to this wonderful site and have posted a few comments today on what I've researched about preventing, and treating chemo-induced peripheral neuropathy; please try to find them.

    In turn, I have a question about your full pelvic radiation with a 'cisplatin chaser." Soon to begin radiation, and under treatment since October in Philadelphia, I FIRST learned of this protocol through an accidental encounter with the head chemo nurse a few days ago. She said, "If you're starting pelvic radiation soon, you might want to add cisplatin, which makes it more effective."

    What I couldn't figure out is why neither my oncologist or radiologist had ever suggested it. I am having trouble deciding whether to do just brachytherapy or full pelvic radiation first (IMRT) followed by brachytherapy.

    Could you share the side-effects for you of pelvic radiation with cisplatin? Was the dose of cisplatin high, moderate, or low?
    Had you had any chemo prior to this regimen (any rounds of taxol/carboplatin?)

    Appreciatively,
    Rosey R
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    minniejan said:

    Roll call
    I live in SE Pennsylvania between Philadelphia and Lancaster. Prior to my diagnosis I was a very healthy active 58 year old. (My history is multiple basil cell skin cancers in my 30's, fibroids and benign uterine polyps in my mid and late 40's and a history of high blood pressure, which was under control with medication.)

    My uterine cancer was first diagnosed on December 14th, 2010 after just mild symptoms the previous week. I had surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salipingoophorectomy, omentectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection on December 29 at the Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania. I pushed for the quickest surgery possible due to the diagnosis of Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma. I spent New Years in Philly, something I always wanted to do! :) I slept through the fireworks!!! I have found that HUP is an amazing place, and am very pleased so far with the team approach at the Jordan Center for Gynecological Cancer at Penn.

    The cancer is stage 1 with a grade of 3. I will start chemo on Feb. 8, ( Carboplatin and Taxol) and start vaginal cylinder brachytherapy on Feb. 16.

    I have noticed others with thyroid nodules on this website, I too was diagnosed with 3 of them during a pre-surgery PET scan and am now being followed by an endocrinologist as well. I was told they are too small to biopsy and to watch them for 6 months.

    Jan

    YOUR TREATMENT IN PHILADELPHIA

    Dear Minniejan,

    I too am in treatment for recently diagnosed uterine cancer at HUP.

    I love the Abramson Cancer Center--bright and cheerful--and find my oncologist and radiologist very competent although wish I could get an occasional "consultation" with the onc; not once since diagnosis five months ago have I had even a half-hour sit down session with him/her (trying to proect identity), just quick pelvic exams followed by pacing around the room and "do you have any questions?" The few emails (three) I have ever sent get referred to the chemo nurse, who calls and tries to answer. So my only dissatisfaction is with quality of communication: pretty important, I'd say. Radiologist on other hand is open to appointments involving JUST consultation and even gave me her email address.

    Have just finished third round of taxol/carboplatin: your own regime, with amazingly few side effects so far. (See earlier posts on trying to avoid PN) but a bit worried about how MUCH radiation to pursue; second opinons are conflicted on just brachy versus full pelvic plus brachy. Need to decide within a week! Worry about longterm effects of pelvic as I need to go back to work in September to teach twelve hours a week: not a lot, but attacks of diahrrhea are one thing at a desk job and another if you're in front of a class!

    Let me know how the brachy is going; will be starting myself in about three weeks.

    Have fantasized about starting a small support group in Philly for women with high grade (2-3) endometrial cancer but would prefer a small group (5-8?) who are upbeat, on the whole, and determined to survive. Perhaps we could get together once a month for dinner at great local restaurants or host each other in our homes or apartments?

    Anyone interested?

    Rosey R
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    minniejan said:

    Roll call
    I live in SE Pennsylvania between Philadelphia and Lancaster. Prior to my diagnosis I was a very healthy active 58 year old. (My history is multiple basil cell skin cancers in my 30's, fibroids and benign uterine polyps in my mid and late 40's and a history of high blood pressure, which was under control with medication.)

    My uterine cancer was first diagnosed on December 14th, 2010 after just mild symptoms the previous week. I had surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salipingoophorectomy, omentectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection on December 29 at the Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania. I pushed for the quickest surgery possible due to the diagnosis of Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma. I spent New Years in Philly, something I always wanted to do! :) I slept through the fireworks!!! I have found that HUP is an amazing place, and am very pleased so far with the team approach at the Jordan Center for Gynecological Cancer at Penn.

    The cancer is stage 1 with a grade of 3. I will start chemo on Feb. 8, ( Carboplatin and Taxol) and start vaginal cylinder brachytherapy on Feb. 16.

    I have noticed others with thyroid nodules on this website, I too was diagnosed with 3 of them during a pre-surgery PET scan and am now being followed by an endocrinologist as well. I was told they are too small to biopsy and to watch them for 6 months.

    Jan

    YOUR TREATMENT IN PHILADELPHIA

    Dear Minniejan,

    I too am in treatment for recently diagnosed uterine cancer at HUP.

    I love the Abramson Cancer Center--bright and cheerful--and find my oncologist and radiologist very competent although wish I could get an occasional "consultation" with the onc; not once since diagnosis five months ago have I had even a half-hour sit down session with him/her (trying to proect identity), just quick pelvic exams followed by pacing around the room and "do you have any questions?" The few emails (three) I have ever sent get referred to the chemo nurse, who calls and tries to answer. So my only dissatisfaction is with quality of communication: pretty important, I'd say. Radiologist on other hand is open to appointments involving JUST consultation and even gave me her email address.

    Have just finished third round of taxol/carboplatin: your own regime, with amazingly few side effects so far. (See earlier posts on trying to avoid PN) but a bit worried about how MUCH radiation to pursue; second opinons are conflicted on just brachy versus full pelvic plus brachy. Need to decide within a week! Worry about longterm effects of pelvic as I need to go back to work in September to teach twelve hours a week: not a lot, but attacks of diahrrhea are one thing at a desk job and another if you're in front of a class!

    Let me know how the brachy is going; will be starting myself in about three weeks.

    Have fantasized about starting a small support group in Philly for women with high grade (2-3) endometrial cancer but would prefer a small group (5-8?) who are upbeat, on the whole, and determined to survive. Perhaps we could get together once a month for dinner at great local restaurants or host each other in our homes or apartments?

    Anyone interested?

    Rosey R
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    RoseyR said:

    Kind of uterine cancer and where I'm being treated

    Dear Linda,

    Was recently diagnosed with MMMT endometrial cancer, a very aggressive tumor, caught reasonably early (stage 1B) with clear lymph nodes and no signs of spread.

    Had complete hysterectomy at HUP (Philadelphia) and am about to start radiation in three weeks but after three opinions from leading specialists in Philadelphia, still conflicted on how much I should have before last three rounds of taxol/carboplatin.

    RoseyR

    APOLOGIES FOR MULTIPLE POSTS--CAN ANYONE HELP ME TO AVOID THEM?

    DEAR CSN MEMBERS,

    Brand new to this site, I see with embarrassment that a few of my messages today have posted repetitively, four to five times.

    How does this happen--and how can I avoid it?


    Appreciatively,
    Rosey R
  • lkchapman
    lkchapman Member Posts: 106
    RoseyR said:

    APOLOGIES FOR MULTIPLE POSTS--CAN ANYONE HELP ME TO AVOID THEM?

    DEAR CSN MEMBERS,

    Brand new to this site, I see with embarrassment that a few of my messages today have posted repetitively, four to five times.

    How does this happen--and how can I avoid it?


    Appreciatively,
    Rosey R

    Hi Rosey, Sometimes on
    Hi Rosey,
    Sometimes on especially long discussion threads it takes a really long time for your comment to post. Never press the post comment button more than once. You just have to be patient. It should eventually go through. :)

    Laura
  • pixieetz
    pixieetz Member Posts: 1
    diagnosis
    I am 62 and was diagnosed with Stage 3B endometrial cancer on Dec. 2, 2010. Had radical hystorectomy on NOv. 19, 2010. Have just finished 4 of my 6 chemo treatments...Paclitaxol and Carboplatin. CA125 markers going down. No radiation in my treatment plan. Begin treated at Siteman Cancer Ctr. St. Louis.
  • kfparke
    kfparke Member Posts: 8
    pixieetz said:

    diagnosis
    I am 62 and was diagnosed with Stage 3B endometrial cancer on Dec. 2, 2010. Had radical hystorectomy on NOv. 19, 2010. Have just finished 4 of my 6 chemo treatments...Paclitaxol and Carboplatin. CA125 markers going down. No radiation in my treatment plan. Begin treated at Siteman Cancer Ctr. St. Louis.

    Kathy from Kansas - MMMT diagnosis
    Uterine tumor was detected and biopsied on November 18, 2010 during visit to OBY/GYN for slight vaginal bleeding episode. Da Vinci Robotic hysterectomy (tubes, uterus and ovaries removed) performed December 22,2010 with 35 lymph nodes removed and no involvement seen in lymph nodes and tumor had minimal invasion of the uterus. Staged at 1A and of course Grade 3 (MMMT -aggressive and unpreditable). Chemo (carbo/taxol) total of six treatments every 3 weeks prescribed and have completed 3 treatments thus far with minimal side effects. CA125 was taken AFTER first treatment so I don't know if this will be a good marker or not for me but will continue to ask for the test. Current CA125 is 15. No radiation in my treatment plan either.
  • Pat51
    Pat51 Member Posts: 130
    Roll Call
    My name is Pat and I live in Wisconsin. I have been diagnosed with UPSC. I am happy to meet all of you. I personally have not met anyone else with UPSC.

    After a couple days of slight spotting, I had a uterine biopsy done on Feb. 4, 2011. I was diagnosed with UPSC on Feb. 9,2011. I had a cervical biopsy done on Feb. 9, 2011 that came back negative. I had robotic assisted surgery done on Feb. 18, 2011. They removed my uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes,ovaries, appendix, omentum, 16-21 lymph nodes, had 6 peritoneal biopsies and had pelvic washings. The pathology confirmed the UPSC found on the uterine biopsy. The tumor was on the inner half of the uterine wall and was contained in the uterus. The lymph nodes were all negative, all peritoneal biopsies were negative, the pelvic washing was clear, the lymphovascular system was clear, nothing was found in the omentum. I was staged at 1B by the older staging and stage 1A by the more recent FIGO staging with a grade 2/3 tumor. I was told that UPSC usually presents itself in later stages so I was grateful for the lower stage, but it is still a very aggressive and scary disease. I started my chemo just short of three weeks after surgery, on March 10. Chemo is given once every three weeks. I am to take 6 rounds of carboplatin/taxotere and then radiation. However, I am not sure of what radiation therapy will consist of at this time. The radiologist does not see many cases of UPSC and is unsure of a recommendation and wants me to get more opinions.
  • Ro10
    Ro10 Member Posts: 1,561
    Pat51 said:

    Roll Call
    My name is Pat and I live in Wisconsin. I have been diagnosed with UPSC. I am happy to meet all of you. I personally have not met anyone else with UPSC.

    After a couple days of slight spotting, I had a uterine biopsy done on Feb. 4, 2011. I was diagnosed with UPSC on Feb. 9,2011. I had a cervical biopsy done on Feb. 9, 2011 that came back negative. I had robotic assisted surgery done on Feb. 18, 2011. They removed my uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes,ovaries, appendix, omentum, 16-21 lymph nodes, had 6 peritoneal biopsies and had pelvic washings. The pathology confirmed the UPSC found on the uterine biopsy. The tumor was on the inner half of the uterine wall and was contained in the uterus. The lymph nodes were all negative, all peritoneal biopsies were negative, the pelvic washing was clear, the lymphovascular system was clear, nothing was found in the omentum. I was staged at 1B by the older staging and stage 1A by the more recent FIGO staging with a grade 2/3 tumor. I was told that UPSC usually presents itself in later stages so I was grateful for the lower stage, but it is still a very aggressive and scary disease. I started my chemo just short of three weeks after surgery, on March 10. Chemo is given once every three weeks. I am to take 6 rounds of carboplatin/taxotere and then radiation. However, I am not sure of what radiation therapy will consist of at this time. The radiologist does not see many cases of UPSC and is unsure of a recommendation and wants me to get more opinions.

    Welcome Pat 51
    Sorry you have to join our sisterhood, but glad your diagnosis was only 1A. I am glad you found this site. It has really good information, and positive information. Hope you are doing okay with your chemo. The unknown of how everything is going to go is very unsettling. I was diagnosed with UPSC III-C in 1/09. I too had the robotic surgery, and was surprised I too started chemo 3 weeks after the surgery. In 2/11 I started a repeat of the Taxol/Carbo for a recurrence. Because I knew what to expect the hair loss did not bother me this time. I know it grows back in time. Good luck with your radiation. I am glad you are getting opinions on what is best for you. Did you go to a GYN/Ono? They are more specialized in UPSC. Good luck to you.

    Pat you may want to copy and paste your above post on a new discussion. This one is so long and others may not see it. The sisters on this site are very encouraging and willing to answer any question you may have. They also have a great set of ears when you just want to ventilate. In peace and caring.
  • iamawonder
    iamawonder Member Posts: 5
    Roll Call
    Hello my name is Alta I am 53 with two children, I was diagnosed on Feb 18 with uterine cancer. I live in Northern Virginia with my fiancee and two adult children. This was very hard for me to deal with at first as I have been watching my mom who had cervical cancer and is in the last stages of her life as her cancer was diagnosed late and had traveled through out her body. I went through a hysterectomy on March 2 and am now 4 weeks recovery. Just spoke with the radiologist Oncologist and was told I will do internal radiation for 3 weeks one day a week. My cancer was caught early it was considered stage 2 as it did get into the cervix, but it was a grade 1 making it easy to treat. I will start the radiaiton in two weeks and will be done in no time. I then will have to go for check ups every 3 months for the first two years and then 6 months for the next two years until I can get to the 5 year mark. Good luck to everyone on this site
  • Rewriter
    Rewriter Member Posts: 493

    Roll Call
    Hello my name is Alta I am 53 with two children, I was diagnosed on Feb 18 with uterine cancer. I live in Northern Virginia with my fiancee and two adult children. This was very hard for me to deal with at first as I have been watching my mom who had cervical cancer and is in the last stages of her life as her cancer was diagnosed late and had traveled through out her body. I went through a hysterectomy on March 2 and am now 4 weeks recovery. Just spoke with the radiologist Oncologist and was told I will do internal radiation for 3 weeks one day a week. My cancer was caught early it was considered stage 2 as it did get into the cervix, but it was a grade 1 making it easy to treat. I will start the radiaiton in two weeks and will be done in no time. I then will have to go for check ups every 3 months for the first two years and then 6 months for the next two years until I can get to the 5 year mark. Good luck to everyone on this site

    Welcome, Alta
    I am glad that you found us, although I am sorry for the reason. Good for you, though, that your cancer is considered easy to treat.

    I assume that you are having vaginal brachytherapy, which I and many of the women here had too. I trust that you will find the treatment to be easy, painless, and quick.

    We are a friendly, supportive group with a wealth of information; so if you have any questions, just ask.

    All the best,

    Jill
  • iamawonder
    iamawonder Member Posts: 5
    Rewriter said:

    Welcome, Alta
    I am glad that you found us, although I am sorry for the reason. Good for you, though, that your cancer is considered easy to treat.

    I assume that you are having vaginal brachytherapy, which I and many of the women here had too. I trust that you will find the treatment to be easy, painless, and quick.

    We are a friendly, supportive group with a wealth of information; so if you have any questions, just ask.

    All the best,

    Jill

    Thank you
    Hello Jill,

    Thank you for the warm welcome. Since I was told I have been reading more and more just to know what is going to happen and what I need to know about preventive and pro active things needed in my life. I will be going through Vaginal Brachytherapy for a 3 week period with three treatments, one each week. The Oncology Radiolgist feels that this will be enough to ensure non to come back to the vaginal cuff. Until you get told you have cancer you have no idea how you will feel or how you will react. I have been lucky as they took 32 lymph nodes and found no cancer in them. There was only in the uteris and in the cervical connective tissue. There was none outside of the uteris itself. In speaking to all the Dr's and Nurses I have seen thus far they feel that this was caught early and is very treatable. I know that I am looking forward to the treatments to be all over with and to regain some sort of control again. I feel that this has taken all the control over in my life. At first this was the only thing I thought of when I woke in the morning and the last thing I thought of before I went to sleep. I know it will never be far from my mind but I also know I have to make a point of living the best I can with the wonderful man that stands there with me and the two adult kids I have. Again let me thank you for the welcome and I do plan on asking questions if I have any. I want to know as much of what is going to happen to me as well as what is going to be done to me.