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Any suggestions on how to drink more water when you are tired of it?

tyjsbtn
Posts: 50
Joined: Sep 2014

I am about 3 1/2 weeks post operative where I had my left kidney removed.  Before I found out about my kidney cancer I drank ice tea and coke's.  Now of course those are a huge no-no and I have been drinking water and juice.  I am at a point where I really do not want water even though I know that is best.  Any suggestions on how I can make sure that I get enough water?

 

Thank you

aamdsi
Posts: 284
Joined: Apr 2014

There are also some really good flavored waters out there.  My daughter makes "infused" water that's easy, cheap and pretty tasty. 

Fruit as well.  Watermelon, oranges, apples.... Water doesn't need the liquid form in a glass 8-)

I dirink it as cold as I can, sometimes with the peel of an orange or sprig of mint in it.

Think once you get used to not drinking pop - it will be easier.

Cheers?

Laurie

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

Do you drink carbonated mineral water? You could mix that with some real fruit juice (a splash of Welches grape juice, tangerine juice, etc) and make a flavorful lower calorie soda. I know some people don't like fruit sodas but it might help break up the monotony. 

I think the key is to stay hydrated in a healthy way. You could increase your intake of high water content fruit for additional hydration. 

 

The biggest thing my husband did was force himself to start making drinking water a routine of life. He isn't fond of it, but it's just sort of "what he does" now. Good luck, it think it will get easier once you just make it your routine.

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

Ok, so I answered for my husband (kidney cancer StageT3A) but I am also having the same problem and suffer from migraines due to dehydration. I barely ever feel thristy and also force myself to drink adequate fluids.  I forgot some of my own tips, I hope they are helpful 

#1. You could try drinking from a straw. I prefer this and found out I drank more water from one and enjoyed it more. Who knows why, but it worked. 

#2: Temperatures. I discovered that I actually prefer room temperature water. How bizarre! That increased my water intake a lot. Maybe play around with that.

#3: I hate to admit it, but I LOVE Smart Water. I dislike not being environmentally friendly, but if you find a fancier bottled water you prefer and it helps, and it's in your budget I say go for it. 

 

 

I am alive
Posts: 316
Joined: Jul 2012

Milk. Orange juice. Prune juice. Pineapple juice. Grape juice.Cranberry juice (sweetened & nonsweetened). Gatorade. Apple juice. Cider. Tomato juice. V8. Iced tea. Hot tea. Lemonade. Pink lemonade. Soy milk. Almond milk. Carrot juice...... True, a lot of these have a lot of sugar. But I stock my fridge with a variety of them to break up the monotony of water, water, water. I figure it's more important to stay hydrated than be sugar-free. But then I don't have diabetes. Remember to stay away from grapefruit juice if you are on medication - has an adverse affect on many meds.

Positive_Mental_Attitude's picture
Positive_Mental...
Posts: 454
Joined: Jul 2014

Curious why iced tea is not allowed.

aamdsi
Posts: 284
Joined: Apr 2014

Beyond the caffine...ice tea would seem a good way to "fill up"

The grapefruit juice thing is curious too. Wonder what is in it and not the ather juices that makes it so dangerous to mix?

 

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1304
Joined: Jan 2013

Grapefruit in general absolutely changes the absorption rate of at least one of the drugs we have.. maybe two, I am not sure if there are more or not.  There is a warning on the drug info.  But often doctors do not mention this to patients.  A good reason to read the provided drug info..

Ron

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 653
Joined: Oct 2012

The mechanisms for this revolves around how most pharmaceutical agents and TKI’s (Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors), including Sutent and Votrient, are metabolized in the gut.  They are both substrates (that is, a chemical that is acted on by an enzyme) for the liver enzyme known as Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). However, other drugs or foods can also be substrates for CYP3A4.  If so, they may “compete” with Sutent or other TKI's for the amount of CYP3A4 enzyme that is readily available. If these other substances use up a lot of the CYP3A4 enzyme then the TKI may not get metabolized properly. Instead the TKI may remain in the blood stream at an abnormally high level. This could possibly lead to some very severe side effects.

In addition, any supplements (or other medications or foods) that increase (or “induces) the activity of this enzyme (such as St. John's Wort or Green Tea will decrease the concentration of Sutent or other TKI's getting into the bloodstream.  The increased activity of CYP3A4 will cause them to be metabolized too quickly, resulting in less of it being available to fight angiogenesis (blood vessel creation). In contrast, anything that decreases (or “inhibits”) the activity of this enzyme (such as Grapefruit, Seville Oranges, or Pomegranates) will increase the concentration of Sutent or other TKI's staying in the bloodstream.  That result could become dangerous.

tyjsbtn
Posts: 50
Joined: Sep 2014

My doctor said that there is a chemical in tea and dark soda's that are hard on the kidneys.  I am not sure what it is but I don't want to take a chance on the one kidney I have left.

Positive_Mental_Attitude's picture
Positive_Mental...
Posts: 454
Joined: Jul 2014

I don't want to dispute what your doctor said, but if you have a chance, I would be curious to hear the basis for this regarding iced tea.  I did a Google search for iced tea and kidney and came up with this link:

http://www.healthnewsreview.org/2012/08/iced-tea-kidney-stones-and-the-study-that-never-existed/

 

“The other day someone recommended that I write about the connection between iced tea and kidney stones. These painful deposits of minerals and salt that form in the urinary tract are of particular interest to me because I am the daughter of a 10-time kidney stone sufferer. As soon as I started Googling about for more information on my possible story, I saw that my curiosity had company. Articles all over the web were citing a new study that said iced tea drinkers are at an increased risk for this painful ailment.

Unfortunately, that study everyone was so hyped about doesn’t exist.

It all started with a Loyola University news release. In it Dr. John Milner, a urologist and an assistant professor in Department of Urology at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, warns that iced tea contains high levels of oxalate* (a chemical known to cause calcium stones, which are the most common type of kidney stone) and that, therefore, drinking a lot of iced tea might increase an individual’s risk of developing kidney stones. (In case your wondering: Dr. Milner went on to say in the release that hot tea — which also contains oxalate — is less of a concern merely because people in the U.S. don’t consume as much of it as they do its iced counterpart.)

Altogether the information in the release was pretty interesting stuff and I actually learned a lot from it. What I didn’t learn was why Loyola University wrote it. So I did what I would think most journalists would do and I called the press office (the phone number for which was conveniently located at the top of the news release). I spoke with one of the media relations people and asked whether there was a study attached to this release or if it was just a helpful tip. I was told it was the latter and we said our goodbyes. That call of less than 2 minutes killed my story and gave life to this blog post.

As a reader of science journalism you deserve to know that it is (regrettably) common for reporters to rewrite press releases without doing any additional reporting.”

Indeed, Newsday reported: “People who drink iced tea may be putting themselves at greater risk for developing painful kidney stones, a new study indicates.”  Where’d they get that?  Probably from Healthday, which reported what we show you here:

Srashedb
Posts: 482
Joined: Dec 2013

not to be flip about your getting tired of water; my husband never drank water before this kidney cancer and even then, it has been my nagging that had him drinking it but not as much as I suggested.

He actually found some obscure website that said cafiene was the same as water.

then, last month, his creatine was high and GFR low. They administered the contrast but hydrated and flushed him with an IV.

this week, he had follow-up testing (after he more than doubled his water intake), creatine was down and GFR up.

i think knowing in your head is one thing; knowing out of experience another.

Sarah

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

Based on my husbands personal experience, I caution against too much juices. Post nephrectomny weight gain was something my husband got feedback about from his doctor and I think drinking juices a lot contributed to that. He also cut out diet sodas. I think tea is acceptable but again, too much sweetened beverages can cause weight gain, as I'm sure we all know. Personally, I enjoy grape juice cut half with water anyways. 

tyjsbtn
Posts: 50
Joined: Sep 2014

Thank you everyone for all of your suggestions.  I have been drinking more juice and I do like some of the flavored waters and it seems to be better.

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1304
Joined: Jan 2013

There is an association with Kidney stones not being good for a person with one Kidney, but that is not the story.  Your Kindey(s) need to process or filter what goes through it.  We want to be sure we do not overload ourself.   First what do your blood tests tell you about your Kidney function..?  That is a good starting point.  Look at Creatinine and GFR numbers.    Oh and all that sugar some people put in their tea, etc is not good either.  In the end, water is your best new friend.

Good Luck.

Ron

Ed J
Posts: 34
Joined: Oct 2014

I understand that cranberry juice is good for the kidneys.  58 oz per day is about the normal amount recommended.  That's not just water: It's coffee, milk juice, soup, etc.  CUp of tea is about 10 oz

       Glass of juice 10 oz

       Cereal with milk 10 oz

        can of Spryte 12 oz.

        That's 42 ozs right there.  Ad in soup, water, or other liquid and your there.

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 653
Joined: Oct 2012

All of those items (juices; cereal with milk; sodas; etc.) have too much sugar in them, especially when combined together.

Ed J
Posts: 34
Joined: Oct 2014

I will watch my sugar content. 

 

Ed J

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 653
Joined: Oct 2012

Remember, any reduction will help.  But occasional "treats" are fine.

Darron's picture
Darron
Posts: 310
Joined: Jun 2013

It is all about changing your lifestyle and doing what is best for your body. Fighting cancer (even post op stage I that got it all) means making a few changes into how you take care of the chemistry experiment we call our bodies. You immune system should be in high alert. That means it needs to be properly hydrated and haw good clean blood. The way to help your remaining kidney is to avoid salts for keeping blood pressure down, avoid high protein meals like red meat that are difficult for your kidney, and drink lots of water.

adding up liquids in you soup and clerical misses the point. depending on you size, drink atleast  3 liters a day. I carry a .5 liter bottle with me and constantly sip. I make a point to finish two bottles between each meal, one when I wake up, and one at night. You kidney and you immune system will thank you. It takes time to get used to, but it amazing how it impacts your bloodwork and your energy level.

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 653
Joined: Oct 2012

Sorry Darron.  Although there is evidence that high protein causes harm in people with diagnosed kidney disease, the same does not apply to people with healthy kidneys (even if there is only one). In fact, there are no studies showing harmful effects of protein in people who don’t have kidney disease.

Back in 1983, researchers first discovered that eating more protein increases your "glomerular filtration rate," or GFR. Think of GFR as the amount of blood your kidneys are filtering per minute. From this finding, many scientists made the leap that a higher GFR places your kidneys under greater stress.

But nearly 2 decades ago, Dutch researchers found that while a protein-rich meal did boost GFR, it didn't have an adverse effect on overall kidney function. In fact, there's zero published research showing that downing hefty amounts of protein—specifically, up to 1.27 grams per pound of body weight a day—damages healthy kidneys.

http://authoritynutrition.com/is-too-much-protein-bad-for-you/

CynMur
Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 2014

I have never been a good water drinker, but I find I enjoy flavored seltzers.  I pour it into a big wine glass with some ice and maybe a slice of lemon or lime.  Much more palatable than plain tap water (and of course, zero calories).

tyjsbtn
Posts: 50
Joined: Sep 2014

Thank youto all that have responded.  Giving up my tea and soda was not difficult for me finding replacements was.  I am drinking a lot more water but also juice and kool-aid and I am being careful to make sure that I am drinking enough each day(dr. said 80 oz per day).  I try to get most of my 80 oz in the form of regular plain filtered water and limit the juice and kool-aid. It has definitely been a journey changing by eating and drinking habits but I know that it is was is best in the long run and if I can stick it out long enough I won't even miss what I am missing now.   

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