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Lymphoma vs Sarcoid

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Hi all,

 

After lots of labwork and tests (chest xra, abdominal ultrasounds, ct scans) it has almost been diagnosed that I have a type of lymphoma. I am completely 100% new at this. I have an appointment with a surgeon Monday to excise a swollen lymph node in my neck. They will have a definitive diagnosis after this. After meeting with a pulmonolgist Tuesday to rule out Sarcoid, he is pretty much thinking it is a lymphoma vs sarcoid. I am anxious and nervous about the chemo/radiation that I will most likely be going through soon. Does anyone that has had this have any suggestions or opinions or any advice they can give me pertaining to this? Thanks so much!

po18guy's picture
po18guy
Posts: 1192
Joined: Nov 2011

On another, now defunct cancer forum, the watchphrase was "You do not have cancer until a pathologist says you have cancer." Doctors, nurses, oncologists - you name it - can offer opinions, but the pathologist casts the deciding vote. Clearly something strange is goig on, but what? There are 68,070 known human illnesses and conditions. 

What is the backstory? Am guessing that a lot took place to bring you here.

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

I have it on good authority there 68,071 potential illnesses (LOL). However I agree that you need to wait for a definitive answer. In the meantime no need to worry yourself unncessarily. There is lots of info on lymphoma and sarcoid treatment options available online And from the NCI. I have an app on my iphone which goes through the varios types of lymphoma and treatment options. Oops, count just changed To 68,072. In any case, if you do find you have lymphoma there are lots of good people here who have gone through it and who will be happy to offer non-professional advice on dealing with it. That said, your oncologist/hematologist is the best source Of advice and information. Many forms of lymphoma are very very treatable and allow many of us to live a normal lifespan. Darn  the count of possible illnesses just changed again - 68,168.3 - but lymphoma is still one of the most treatable.

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3662
Joined: May 2012

Shady,

Many years ago, I was in a political argument online with a friend (unbelievable, I know) who said that a politician had to be a skunk because of how many Goggle hits the guy had.  This is not uncommon 'reasoning' in our day.

I responded that there were 3.2 million returns for a search of 'Nose Digging.'     The number may have gone up or down since then, depending on the research.   

Remember, follow the science....  Gotta watch closely, because it changes daily.

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

all I know for sure is there's 1352 guitar pickers in Nashville!

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3662
Joined: May 2012

TN,

The good news is that you will know somthing soon (when the biopsy comes back).  It is of course possible that the neck node has different causation than the lung nodes, but the doctors will figure that out.  A sister-in-law was diagnosed decades ago with Sarcoidosis, filling both lungs.  While sarcoidosis is NOT cancer (it is an autoimmune disorder), it is not automatically a blessing to have it instead of a lymphoma.   Lymphomas are commonly among the most controllable or even curable of cancers, but sarcoidosis has no cure, and last I heard from her, few treatments.  It basically waxes and wanes, and is conrolled mostly with Prednisone, but at least it does usually respond well to Prednisone.

 

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Yes, it definitely took a lot to get me here and this was found incidentally. Long story...I was anemic a couple of years ago and it had to be treated with iron infusions. I have received all of my reports from the hematologist/oncologist that treated me for this. I felt better for about 6 months and then I began to feel fatigued again. I did not have a follow up appointment for a year, because at that time all of my labs were within range. I was told I could come in at anytime to have labs drawn, so I went periodically because the fatigue wasn't going away. After labs were reviewed my hemoglobin was either in range or a tad low, my platelets were elevated, and my iron was low but my ferritin high so no need for more infusions. So I continued to trust what the doctor said. Anywho, in May I was going to have an elective surgery, and when I went for my pre-op the nurse called me and told me that my wbc was elevated. I contacted the hem/onc office to ask what they had been the last two times I was there. They were 14.4 in October, 11.5 in April (after having covid), and 13.92 at the pre-op. Which goes to tell me, my wbc has been elevated for months and prior to October as well. My sister and a close friend of my husband are both nurse practitioners and said this was a red flag and no matter your speciality, this should have been looked into. I was able to get in with a new hematologist who works for the same organization that I do and he started researching all of this and ran more labs than I can count, but he did all he could and ordered the chest X-ray and cat scan and they found what they referred to as "grapefruit" size masses in my mediastinum and now the node in my neck. I feel like this was over looked and should have been caught before. I know that I don't have a definitive answer yet and I and keeping a positive attitude. I will meet with a surgeon on Monday to excise the node from my neck and get the results. Thank you all for your responses. I have an amazing support group of family and friends but it also helps to talk to others going through or who have been through similar experiences, because nobody knows the feeling until you're personally going through it. I will keep you all updated. 

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Also, may I add, the first hematologist who prescribed the infusions told me last week not to worry about my wbc because it is probably due to Covid. I feel if he would review everything he would see that they were actually higher before Covid than a couple weeks after I got over it. And were also elevated prior to that. I have researched and researched lymphoma and sarcoid. My symptoms closely relate to lymphoma as I have drenching night sweats, fatigue, on top of what the x-ray showed and then pulmonologist described, who has an outstanding reputation where I live and has done this for 36 years. Let me be clear, my appointment with the surgeon is Monday and then the surgery will be scheduled. I have a strong faith in God, and I will take any prayers I can get. 

Sandy Ray's picture
Sandy Ray
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Joined: May 2017

Hopefully the biopsy will tell you what you need to know. There are many kinds of lymphoma and also many types of chemotherapy used based on the diagnosis. While Chemo is definitely not enjoyable depending on the type it can be much easier than expected. There are side effects but it is not usually as rough as the stories we hear from years ago. When you find out your results it will be much easier for people to give you some guidance in what to expect. Pray and hope for good results.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Thank you so much Sandy. Yes, I hope to have an answer soon regardless of what it is.  I'm trying to be positive. I truly believe God can perform miracles and there is a reason for everything is my outlook on life. I feel blessed that this was caught when it was and I will take it day by day, one step at a time.

po18guy's picture
po18guy
Posts: 1192
Joined: Nov 2011

In 2014-2015, I ended up with three simultaneous cancers (two T-Cell Lymphomas and MDS, which is a precusrsor to AML). Essentially a 0% chance of surviving. I had a stem cell transplant in 2015 and there has been no sign of either lymphoma for those six years, and no sign of the MDS in my marrow for four years. So, if you need a miracle, ask BIG. 

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Wow, that's amazing and glad that you made it through all of that! Definitely asking big!

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

PO's story is an inspiration to all of us.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Hi all,

I had surgery for lymph node biopsy Thursday and was contacted by my doctor Friday afternoon with a confirmed diagnosis of lymphoma. Pathology is still pending and will know specifics next week. I will update when I know. Thanks!

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
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Joined: May 2012

You are making progress, and cure depends on accurate diagnosis.   While a curosry review in the lab can confirm lymphoma, nailing down the strain can take a lot longer, sometimes over a week.  There are over 50 W.H.O.-recognized forms of NHL, and five forms of Hodgkins.  Prognosis, treatment, etc. varies wildly, based upon type.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

I have had some people tell me to ask for a second opinion. Is this something you or anyone else recommends?

po18guy's picture
po18guy
Posts: 1192
Joined: Nov 2011

...in a twisted sort of way, it can be comforting to know the enemy - now that it is unmasked. You have both a target and a goal. Faith, hope and love can and will get you through this. 

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

I completely agree and that is how I felt when I got the phone call. I expected that so it wasn't such a shock, and I'm glad I at least know what it is until the rest of the testing is completed. Thank you, and Yes faith, hope, and love!

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Also, are there any good vitamins or supplements that anyone recommends to take or have taken?

PBL
Posts: 315
Joined: Jul 2016

As a rule of thumb, now that you have an actual lymphoma diagnosis (and soon to be complete...) I strongly suggest you ask your hematologist what s/he thinks you need. 

Depending on your treatment - and bear in mind that in some cases, your treatment may initially consist in "watch and wait", i.e. NO actual intervention at all - some foods (not to mention vitamins or supplements) may not be compatible with the medications you are given.

I hope this helps.

PBL

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Thank you for your response! That is helpful. I didn't know if there was anything to help with fatigue etc. but I will most definitely check with my hema/onc regarding this. Thanks for the advice!

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

Bad news is you have lymphoma. Good news is it's only lymphoma! This is a very treatable disease and treatment options are expanding rapidly.

Best advice is avoid all vitamins and supplements during treatment. After treatment consult with your medical team before taking any supplements. Be skeptical of claims by people who want to sell you something! Tennessee strong!

When you see this, believe it!   "This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease"

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

I like your positivity! That is my perspective on things right now as well. At least it is lymphoma, as much as no one ever wants a cancer diagnosis. I am thankful we found it the way we did and when we did. I already have "grapefruit size" masses in my mediastinum, is how they were described from the pulmonologist. I'm just ready to find out exactly what it is and fight it head on. Thanks for the support And advice! It really means more than anything else. And yes, Tennessee strong! 

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
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Joined: May 2012

TN,

Second opinions (diagnostic) are most justified in cases in which (1) the cancer is a very rare variety, and (2) when it is one that is difficult to diagnose.   Factors 1 and 2 are usually found together.   If you are being treated at a premier cancer center with a highly-regarded pathology department, and if neither factors 1 or 2 are present, then most people would not see a second opinion as necessary.  Also, oncologists will TELL you, straight up, whether or not your diagnosis is problematic.   A lesser form of 'second opinion' is having the biopsy sample sent to a second patholgy lab for confirmation.   This is more common, and does not reqire that the patient travel, etc.

Second opinions regarding treatment selection are justifed if the treatments are necessarily severe or life-threatening (e.g., SCT).  Usually, lymphoma at a given stage allows more than one Best Practices treatment choice.   Good oncologists will go over all accepted treatments in detail and use your choices as a factor in deciding on the therapy.

As everyone mentioned above, supplements, 'holistic remedies,' etc., are almost always discouraged during chemo.  Ask your doctor.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Thank you for this explanation! I've had quite a few people tell me recently that I need to get a second opinion, but at this point I don't see it necessary. On top of that, my husband and I are in the process of selling our house and building a new house which should be ready in September. I have to work and have an income as well. Now, if it does come down to something rare that would be in my best interest for a second opinion then I will do what I need to do. But at this point, we don't know enough for anything.

po18guy's picture
po18guy
Posts: 1192
Joined: Nov 2011

Generally, I have been advised to take a good quality adult multi-vitamin. During treatment (if any), pro-biotics were recommended, but doctor's opinion is final!

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Perfect. I will definitely check with the doctor before doing anything that I am unsure of!

GGc0ok
Posts: 42
Joined: Oct 2020

Hi TN nice to meet you I'm GG

I too have been diagnosed with Lymphom/ leukemia. I have CLL/SLL. Diagnosed Nov. 2, 2020. I'm a "watch and wait" case. I'm being monitored every 3 months. I had my second 3 month checkup on June 8.  I'm stable with slight lymph node enlargement. My labs are all good within range. I've had labs, labs and more labs, X-ray,  Cat scan, Pet Scan, biopsy, Pet scan.  I told the doctor I feel like a time bomb waiting to go off.  He said it doesn't work like that.  That it's slow and treatable.  He tells me "don't lose sleep over it". 
I'm a caregiver for my hubby we're seniors. He's got a lot of ailments. He literally is home bound. He has Pulmonary Fibrosis. Plus heart disease and, diabetes. Being his caregiver has been tough but it's doable. I do get tired usually in the afternoon.  I will take time for myself and rest for a couple hours. I asked my oncologist if there were any supplements I should take, he said no if there were I'd let You know.  But I've taken supplements my whole adult life.  Changing them over the years as I've aged. I did read not to eat raw fish and to not let meat thaw out on counter. Also I was taking Collagen and read that I probably shouldn't take it at this time.  I also stopped coloring my hair, last coloring was in Sept. of last year. My hair started falling out soon after my diagnosis. It was a shock to my system also the diagnosis of my hubby was another shock to the system.  But now seems to be ok. 
I'll be checking in from time to time. Know that this group is very informative, kind, and comforting.  Just what we all need.  
My prayers for you will be ongoing as for all of us that are in this together. 

Hugs GG

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Hi, GG! Thank you for your sweet message. I am sorry to hear about your diagnosis and your husband's health issues as well. It helps a lot to be able to talk to others like you, and all the kind people on this forum. I don't know my full results yet, but hopefully should really soon. My chest x-ray and ct scan showed grapefruit size masses in my mediastinum area. This has been going on for a long time and I have been fatigued for a very long time. I had labs run at my hematologist's office several times on my own accord because of the fatigue, and had trending blood work out of range but nothing was ever done about it. I'm glad they have found yours at the stage they have. I hate the feeling of knowing something is in my body that I have no control over. I have that issue with a lot of things in life lol. Maybe this will teach me how to let go of the things I cannot change and let God be in control. Anyway, please take care of yourself! I know you have a lot of your plate taking care of your husband also, but that's what we do for the people we love, right? I'll be keeping you in my prayers and I'll keep all updated when I get my results. Love and hugs! 

Lauren

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

My oncologist called me this morning and no new information but they are going to make me an appointment for a PET scan and echocardiogram ASAP. If you pray, please keep me in your prayers! 

PBL
Posts: 315
Joined: Jul 2016

The PET scan aims at ascertaining stage of disease and the echocardiogram checks for any cardiac insufficiency prior to chemotherapy.

Make sure you are properly fasted and do not exercise for the 24 hours leading up to the PET scan, as that is key in getting the most accurate results.

Do let us know how things go.

PBL

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
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Oh okay. Thanks for the information. I'm glad that I came across this site, as all of this information helps and the support means a lot. Smile I will most definitely continue to post updates. Appreciate all of the help!

GibiSamtin's picture
GibiSamtin
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Joined: Jun 2021

let's say that no one disease is good

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Received a call from the nurse at my oncologist's office and they have scheduled me for a bone marrow biopsy Monday, PET scan Tuesday, and echo Thursday of next week. She mentioned a CD30 (which I had to look up) and mentioned Hodgkins but still no for sure diagnosis. They have sent the biopsy off to the Mayo Clinic for 2nd opinion. I will meet with my doctor on the 19th and they expect to have all results by then. 

Burni's picture
Burni
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Ive been following your journey so far.Sounds like they are right on all the appoitments,tests,biopsy,scans and echo.The bone marrowbiopsy was the most painful out of all of these.Sorry. They will probably start some sort of chemo plan in two weeks of all the results.Your on the right site to learn and get others comments and encouragement.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
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Joined: Jun 2021

That is encouraging to hear! She mentioned that we should have all results on the 19th when I meet with my oncologist. As far as the biopsy, I guess I'd rather get the worst over with first, right? Lol I'm really glad I found this site just by searching the internet. It's a great source of encouragement like you said, and help and support! Thanks for your comments!

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
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Has anyone had a bone marrow biopsy or know what to expect? I know the bone marrow makes blood cells but is this something they typically do? 

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

I have had it done three times. The purpose is to see if lymphoma has entered the bone marrow. A hollow needle is inserted into one or both hips and a sample of marrow is extracted for lab analysis.  It is not a particularly pleasant experience but is over very quickly. My onc did it in only my left hip but MD Anderson did both hips. As I said it is over in just a minute or two. It sounds worse than it is. You will do just fine.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
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Wow. I have heard that it can be painful, but it is just part of it. I've heard a lot about MD Anderson. If i have to go elsewhere, I will probably go to Vanderbilt. It would be the closest to home but others have recommended MD Anderson and the Mayo Clinic as well. What type of cancer did you have? Thank you for the encouragement. I hope that one day I can post here and be on your side of things and be able to help and support others. It really helps!

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

Stage IV Follicular with bone marrow involvement. I still have it and am under "watch and wait".I guess it is "resting" (LOL). My biggest symptoms are fatigue (quite severe at times - other times not so bad) and neuropathy in my feet. Blood counts remain low which accounts for some of the fatigue. Long as it doesn't transform I am good to go! Vanderbilt is good. My family in the Nashville area swear by them. My main treatment is still with my local oncologist and as backup one visit every 6 months to Duke. You can't go wrong with MD Anderson. I am a mountain person and averse to crowds, traffic and hustle-bustle. I found MD Anderson very intimidating - kinda like grand central station at rush hour with a real language barrier - something my poor hearing didn't help. Great people and they are very, very good at what they do. Cheers.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
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Lol they are just being jerks hanging out! I have read a little about Follicular during research, but I know there are a lot. I'll keep you in my prayers that they don't change. I've had fatigue for a long time now and I just felt something wasn't right with my body. I'm 35 and knew it wasn't normal, as I used to exercise on my treadmill 3-4 times a week and just haven't had the energy to do it in a long time. Cancer doesn't discriminate! Lol I've been to New York many times so I totally understand what you mean by that. Always good to hear positive things about the cancer institutes. Taking it day by day and if I have to go to one at least I have options. Appreciate the encouragement and information!

po18guy's picture
po18guy
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Joined: Nov 2011

I have had more than I can remember. Depends on your pain tolerance. With local anesthetic and some other form of sedation/pain relief, I have found them to be about 2-3 seconds of strong, but dull pain. Then it stops. Two samples, as I remember. The last one, I 'John Wayned' it and just went with the lidocaine injection at the site. Walk in-walk out. The worst I ever had, I was sore for almost two weeks, but that was the only one. The rest were slight discomfort to none at all afterward. But I tend to be rather numb in any case - even below my shoulders.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
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I might be a big baby when it comes to pain. Lol doesnt sound pleasant. The nurse mentioned that they will use versed most likely, so I hope that it won't be too bad!

Evarista's picture
Evarista
Posts: 317
Joined: May 2017

I had two bone marrow biopsies, first without Versed and second with. If I ever need another, it will be with Versed and electric drill.  Didn't feel a thing and over quickly. Battery powered drill is much quicker than manual but it is apparently quite loud and people may find the noise profoundly distressing.  I did not hear it, did not feel it. Some soreness afterwards, but nothing terrible.  Good luck with it.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
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Joined: Jun 2021

I'm not going to lie. I've been doing well, but I'm nervous and scared of the tests next week and waiting for more results. I'm ready to know all the details and tackle this but at the same time I'm scared. Was anybody else like this?

PBL
Posts: 315
Joined: Jul 2016

Think of any first time: you must remember having experienced some degree of apprehension. Right before stepping into the unknown, all human beings (and most certainly all other animals) are especially wary - it's a matter of survival. Now, does it help in your current circumstances? To some extent, sure - but not so much as it would five thousand years ago before walking into an unexplored cave...

You have vetted the people you are putting yourself in the hands of. You have, to the best of your ability, made sure that they are the most likely solution to your issue. The best you can do from there on is to keep learning about your disease and treatment, and trust in them to keep you safe throughout. Some vigilance, of course, is healthy and natural, as long as it does not lead you to stop trusting in your medical team.

It is certainly easier said than done, but you will make your own life easier if you can manage to embrace the situation and let yourself float on that water. If you find that you are overwhelmed by anxiety, speak with your doctor. Sometimes, an anxiolytic can help you through a rougher spot. 

I hope this helps.

PBL

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

This most definitely does help! Any responses with encouragement and support are exactly what I need. I know you've been there, too. I am a worrier and I have anxiety. I do have a prescription for anxiety meds, but I don't take them daily. It's an as needed type of deal, which I'm good with. But this helps to put everything in perspective and think of it the way you described. I appreciate it!

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3662
Joined: May 2012

TN,

My lead oncologist for my first-line treatment was an established guy with decades of experience, Ivy-trained, and a clinical and actual genius, but he was a tad 'old-school' in his medical attitudes (he had/has five active Board Certifications, for instance).    When my wife and I first met him, he had my biopsy results in hand, had mapped out my treatments (with a calander printed for each appointment), and gave me handouts on every drug to be employed, technical data on the disease, as well as on all relevant potential side-effects, and so forth.   He gave me, unasked, two perscriptions that were signed by him before we arrived:   One was a moderate pain killer, the other was lorazepam (Ativan).  He said, "You will likely need these; most of my patients do, but use only as needed."   

The Ativan I used pretty much for my six months of treatment.   I have a totally non-addictive personality and physiology, and walked way from the Ativan with no issues at all, but if you do come to feel it would be benefical, know that it can be habit-forming in some individuals, and proceed with due caution.    I developed a condition known as 'Flu-like Syndrom' after my second infusion, and had it pretty bad, continuously, for the next five months.  Essentially, a patient with FLS feels like they have a bad case of the flu, especially the muscle aches and weakness.   I tried OTC NASIDs at first, but they would not touch this pain, so the perscription pain-killer was clinically necessary in my case.  I am not meaning to worsen your concers; Flu-like Syndrom occures in less than 10% of patients on combination chemotherapy regimens, and virtually all patients get a random, hodge-podge set of side effects.   Particular drugs are linked more strongly to specific side-effects than others (Vinblastine and Vincristine routinely cause neuropathy, for instance), but doctors will tell you that which effects any given patient develops is un-predictable and in-explicable.  Virtually all side-effects are manageable however (e.g., nausea, low WBC counts, etc., are easily controlled today, but a few, like severe fatigue and loss of taste, are less addressable, but almost always mitigate after chemo ends.

When I went to leave this first-ever appointment with my oncologist, he mentioned, alsmost as an afterthought, that before I departed I needed to follow one of the NPs for a bone-marrow biopsy.   I walked into this 'cold.'   The NP asked if I wanted a pain reliever, and I said yes, and about ten minutes after taking it, she came back and did the proceedure.  If you have ever seen the classic Pulp Fiction,  think of the scene in which the guy tells the other,  ' We 'bout to get Medieval on you a-- ! '   Like much in modern medicine, it was relatively primitive in technique.  But, the entry point did not bother me for more than a day or thereabout.   And it ws a very brief proceedure, maybe 10 minutes tops.

In summary, my reasoning is that when offered a pallative while dealing with cancer, use it.  If you hurt, take a pain reliever.  If you are exhausted, sleep.  Not profound observations, but many feel they have naturalistic/homeopathic remedies for these issues. However, these are mostly either quackery, or something that worked at lrandom for one person, but not most.   My chemo expeience was likely worse than most (I did six months of R-ABVD, the most common regimen for Hodgkins-type), and my particular side-effects were loss of all sensation of taste, loss of ALL hair (including eyebrows), severe weakness, neutropenia, severe neuropathy, Flulike Syndrome,  Chemo Fog, and blackening of the nails.  Most patients will experience fewer difficulties than I did.  And bottom-line, I was cured, so I  give thanks, and would do it again today,

 

https://chemocare.com/chemotherapy/side-effects/flulike-syndrome.aspx

max

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Thank you for all of your explanations and recommendations and sharing your story with me. I will be sure to ask for the Ativan if I feel I will need it. I don't have the addictive personality, either. I didn't like the pain meds they gave me for my surgery and only took it a couple of days. Your responses and information are really helping me through this journey and I appreciate it more than you know! I will keep updated on the biopsy tomorrow and scans this week. 

Lauren

ShadyGuy
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2017

in brevity.

TNgirl111619's picture
TNgirl111619
Posts: 41
Joined: Jun 2021

Agreed!

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