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WAR

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

"Flags, medals, wigs, and prosthetics are not enough to convey the truth or mobolize human beings to dessent, resist, and demand the end of war, the cure for cancer, AIDS, and so many other mutant offspring of capatalism.The devil is not in the details, but in the abscence of details that would activate the people to organize and demand greater efforts for the cures of disease, the end of WAR. Finding cures to long-term disease is not beneficial to the coroporate pharmaceutical industry, just as peace would not benefit the military industry complex. It is more profitable to extend an illness than to cure it, to extend a war than to end it. There is a killing field of silence spreading over the United States, a lethargy, a SURRENDER to manufactured "realities" as we subjugate and opiate the true essence and reality  of our own lives to the corporate media-manufactured experiences. We are afraid to look into the toilet of our existence, afraid to see that we have failed ourselves and future generations with apathy, silence, and the obsession with consumption."

I am reading a book called the "Diary Of A Radical Cancer Warrior"...the above came out of it. There is so much truth in it. I make no bones about being against chemo but I did it. I did it out of fear for my life and the refusal of surgery unless I did. I would have died very soon due to the size of my liver tumors. The ironic thing is that the chemo did NOTHING for the liver tumors. I have read countless stories here on this very site  with patients suffering thru 12 cycles, devasting their bodies only to find the chemo did NOTHING. By the same token, you have those peppered in where tumors shrink or disappear but half the time, a recurrence is around the corner. I realize fear for life causes all of us to take risks we wouldn't normally. I chose not to do the mop-up chemo after finishing the first round. I was sicker than I have ever been in my life and I will not continue to pump the crap in my system because that is the standard "protocol". I'm not just blowing smoke in the wind. Believe me, I researched, made phone calls, and had multiple discussions with doctors and oncologists when my husband was battling this disease. I was desparate to save his life. In the end, the chemo destroyed what normalcy he may have had left.  DPD deficiency was not tested for and the chemo accumulated in his organs and ultimately destroyed his body. My oncologist never mentioned testing so I asked for it upfront. I didn't know about it at the time my husband was starting treatment and there are so many others who have dealt with a doctor's "oh, it only affects a handful of patients".  Then why don't they get off their****** and test EVERY patient before chemo??? Why isn't that "standard protocol" when it could be the difference in months of misery, and more importantly, life and a horrible death?? How many individuals are caught in the crosshairs of this disease and have NO time to research for themselves and are left at the mercy of "standard protocols" ?!? Yes, it angers me that the medical profession and drug companies can play Russian Roulette with patients' lives and they are NEVER accountable. The drug reps show up with lunch and other perks while the patients play the guinea pigs for the "new drug". It is all part of "research and treatment"  which still provides no cure.  CUT & BURN is the only way according to "standard protocol". When I decided to end chemo, do you think my oncologist offered suggestions on diet, supplements, or anything else to build my body back up? No..keeping me on chemo was the only thing that would engage her interest. I don't have the answers..just my own. I refuse to be a participant in "standard protocol" but will choose to be an "active and aware" participant in healing my body on my terms. This site has been invaluable in guiding and supporting me thru every turn and decision. I am grateful not to be alone in the trenches. Hugs, M

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

I understand your anger and frustration. I feel it, too. But I never think for one minute that 'big pharma' has the cure but won't give it out. I have a number of reasons why this doesn't make sense but it's too long to post on here. There will never be 'a cure for cancer'. They're all too different and the people with the same cancer respond differently as you've seen on here. The doctors don't know what will be the most effective for any individual or what the side effects will be. The researchers have come up with cures that work great in mice but are useleaa in humans. Also, they don't like using people in studies unless they're end stage. It's not like studying if a cold medicine works or not, if it doesn't it doesn't mean the subject will die.

One of these days there will be breakthroughs, there has to be. People all over the world are looking for the cure(s) and are coming together to share their research so that nobody wastes time on something already tried and failed. The latest breakthrough is finding a way to get chemo and immunotherapy into the brain. The brain is enveloped in a barrier that has prevented anything from crossing it until now. 

It's frustrating and infuriates me that it exists. I wish it was an entity that could be made to suffer for all of us. But it's been around since the dinosaurs and it's a tough one to treat no matter what they choose to do.

My friend's horse was just diagnosed with skin cancer. It's on his sheath which is the outside of the penis. The vet says that it's common in horses where the pigment is different colours on the sheath. He's a black and white pinto. How does that make sense? For him they're going to cut out the tumour and see what happens. Another friend had her brown and white pinto get skin cancer on her neck several years ago. It's kept under control with a cream. White horses are prone to skin cancer. How does that make sense? I've mentioned on here before about other friend's horse getting colon cancer and having to be put down because by the time they found it the tumour was huge. With all the things they say can give us colon cancer from burnt meat to processed foods to just eating too much meat, how does a horse who is a total vegetarian get it? And if it was environmental, why didn't any other of their horses get it? This was about ten years ago and none have gotten it since, either.

I share your frustration. I've lost my mom, two aunts, my brother, my uncle and a dog all to cancer. My dad who smoked since he was a kid died of enphysema (sp?) but not lung cancer. It makes no sense so many times.

Anger is a good outlet sometimes, and the most appropriate response to this horrible disease. Embrace it when you need to. It will keep you in fighting form.

Hugs, 

Jan

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

Jan, I respect your opinion and the way you feel. I absolutely believe drug companies, instance companies, and our government will always put the almighty dollar ahead of ANYTHING and ANYONE. Countless studies and trials that showed great promise have been swallowed whole by major pharmaceutical companies. It happens every day. True, life has no rhyme or reason and I totally get and respect a higher powe than me. I also think it is much easier to put your faith and trust in the white coat when you are terrified, sick, and tired. There has to be a better way.. We each have to find our own.. 

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

Jan, this is an interesting article on immunotherapy. I thought of you when I read this and the struggle you had financially because of the cancer. I think what these companies do and the havoc they bring to cancer patients who struggle to stay alive and pay their bills is criminal and they face no consequences and control the market. This article can be found on Vox...

 

...Patients with health insurance can be denied coverage for immunotherapies, even when it’s recommended by their oncologists. But even when they aren’t, the list prices are so high that the copays can be exorbitant. A patient might face a 25 percent copay, which means they’re getting the drug at a 75 percent discount. When the price tag is upward of $10,000 a month, that leaves patients on the hook to cover at least $2,500 per month. And that’s prohibitive for many people.

These drugs cost so much in America because companies can charge that much

This brings us to the next question: Why do these drugs cost so much? To get to the bottom of it, Emanuel had an interesting thought experiment in a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed. Drug companies typically argue that the cost is related to how much they had to invest in research to develop the drug. The CEO of Novartis, maker of the immunotherapy drug Kymriah, said the R&D costs of the drug were about $1 billion. But Emanuel didn’t buy it:

That’s certainly a big investment, but it is much less astounding when compared with the drug’s anticipated revenue. Based on Kymriah’s list price, treating just 2,700 patients would allow Novartis to recoup its entire investment. Even with significant discounts for many patients, it wouldn’t take many treatments to turn a considerable profit.

... Producing the immunotherapy requires more than three weeks of laboratory manipulations for each individual patient.

But according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, the total cost for removing, reprogramming and infusing the cells into each patient is less than $60,000—just one-sixth of the $373,000 price tag. Production costs do not seem to be driving the stratospheric drug prices.

So he came to the conclusion we have arrived at Vox many times: The drugs cost this much because in America, drug companies are allowed to charge that much. And they reap handsome multibillion-dollar profits as a result.

In other countries, governments exert much more influence over the entire health care process. That allows them to negotiate directly with drugmakers. The government sets a maximum price that it will pay for a drug, and if the company doesn’t agree, it simply loses out on the entire market.

The United States, by contrast, has long taken more of a free market approach to drugs. Pharmaceutical companies can haggle over prices with a variety of private insurers as well as selling to the government. What’s more, Medicare, the government program that is the nation’s largest buyer of drugs, is actually barred from negotiating drug prices. That gives pharma much more leverage.

So drug companies here do what any other profit-maximizing company does — they try to get the highest prices possible without going so high that no one will buy them. And that status quo has led to cancer drugs that cost more than homes.

The public has paid to help develop the drugs they can’t access

One final disturbing aspect of the cancer cost conundrum: Public money helped pay for many of the drugs that patients can’t afford to access.

In a recent analysis, published in the journal PNAS, researchers found that American tax dollars helped fund the basic research that went into every single one of the drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration between 2010 and 2016 — including several cancer immunotherapies. All told, $100 billion in National Institutes of Health research grants helped advance the science behind those drugs.

So the Nobel Prize this week is a reminder of the great promise of these drugs — and the incredible, lifesaving science that led to their discoveries. But it should also be a moment to reflect on who is benefiting from them and who isn’t. How will the 1.7 million Americans who are diagnosed with cancer per year gain access if prices keep rising and we don’t address this cost conundrum soon?

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

I'm in Canada so the cost hasn't been an issue at all. My husband and I figure I've cost a couple of hundred thousand so far for the times in the hospital and the treatments and all the tests. I can't imagine having to make a health decision based on if I can afford it or not. I'd be dead if we had to pay for what I've had done.

Most countries do have health care coverage and are trying to find a cure. This is one of the reasons I don't believe that the cure has been found and is being suppressed. The countries that pay for this stuff wouldn't allow it. The only downside to being treated here is that Canada is slower to accept new therapies and drugs for anything. So there are a few things we can't get here yet.

I really feel for the Americans who have to deal with this. It's just beyond thinking. I feel badly enough that we're having finance issues due to my not being able to work and owing money from the business I had that I hed to sell once I was diagnosed without costing more money. Our taxes here in Canada are higher than in the states, probably due partly to healthcare costs.

I've seen stories of a spouse trying to repay bills accrued when their spouse passed away long after it happened. How sad is that. It's horrible and shouldn't be happening. It's just not right.

We do have to pay for some meds I take but we have insurance that covers 80% of the costs, even for my ostomy supplies.

Jan

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

I am so glad you are in Canada. I've never read much about the healthcare system there but from what you've shared, it sounds like a lot of your care has been covered. That's wonderful. I know of so many here who struggle over paying their bills or buying much needed care and medication. It shouldn't be that way. I don't necessarily think a "cure" is hidden ,but I know that a lot of wonderful research on less severe treatment with potential is squeezed out by major drug companies. As far as anger, I will not let it steal the joy out of life...it never has. Love and light have always carried me thru and I will always reach for both. The life picture is much bigger and I keep my focus on that and things I can control. This is a God-awful disease I hope to see disappear forever before my life is over. Until then, I will fight this in a way that makes sense for me and gives me peace as each of has to do. Wishing you good days and beautiful rides into the sunset...

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

I am so glad you are in Canada. I've never read much about the healthcare system there but from what you've shared, it sounds like a lot of your care has been covered. That's wonderful. I know of so many here who struggle over paying their bills or buying much needed care and medication. It shouldn't be that way. I don't necessarily think a "cure" is hidden ,but I know that a lot of wonderful research on less severe treatment with potential is squeezed out by major drug companies. As far as anger, I will not let it steal the joy out of life...it never has. Love and light have always carried me thru and I will always reach for both. The life picture is much bigger and I keep my focus on that and things I can control. This is a God-awful disease I hope to see disappear forever before my life is over. Until then, I will fight this in a way that makes sense for me and gives me peace as each of has to do. Wishing you good days and beautiful rides into the sunset...

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

I am so glad you are in Canada. I've never read much about the healthcare system there but from what you've shared, it sounds like a lot of your care has been covered. That's wonderful. I know of so many here who struggle over paying their bills or buying much needed care and medication. It shouldn't be that way. I don't necessarily think a "cure" is hidden ,but I know that a lot of wonderful research on less severe treatment with potential is squeezed out by major drug companies. As far as anger, I will not let it steal the joy out of life...it never has. Love and light have always carried me thru and I will always reach for both. The life picture is much bigger and I keep my focus on that and things I can control. This is a God-awful disease I hope to see disappear forever before my life is over. Until then, I will fight this in a way that makes sense for me and gives me peace as each of has to do. Wishing you good days and beautiful rides into the sunset...

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 918
Joined: Apr 2017

I share your frustration with the approach of the medical community.  There were a series of discussions of the profit motive for chemo--I do not know if they were lost in the CSN crash, but my cancer center got 10% of its operating budget from the reimbursement advantage of giving IV/pump chemo.  None of that profit was available when I got capecitabine pills from an unrelated pharmacy.  Would that influence their suggested protocol?  I do not know for sure, but the first approach suggested to most everyone on this forum is FOLFOX.  Only those in the know get CAPOX, even though it is likely more effective.

The same goes for non-chemo strategies.  All I was told was to "resume your normal diet."  No one suggested a pescovegetarian diet.  No one suggested exercise.  I had to beg + cajole to get my vitamin D tested (it was low).  No one mentioned vitamin d supplementation.  And that is just the top of the list of things one can do to optimize their chances of survival.  Why don't they mention this?  That is an unanswered question.

From my point of view, your frustration is very valid.  Hopefully a walk in the mountains will help you to regain some balance.  The past cannot be changed and the future cannot be controlled.  All we have is the present.

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

I‘m not consume with anger nor will I let it take the joy from my life. By the same token, I can’t turn a blind eye to it all either. Buddy, I have seen the same “profit” percentages at my cancer center and others visited by my husband. You have to educate yourself and decide what’s best for your treatment, well-being, and life. Can you imagine the jobless people if cancer was “cured”?!? What would Trump do with that, lol? Port will be out Wednesday morning and I will be in my mountains Wednesday night.... hope you are hiking the hills somewhere..I’m not far behind you.. Hugs, M

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

My fingers don't work well on a tiny phone screen..lol..sorry for the typos

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 918
Joined: Apr 2017

I have a big-event-hike coming up in a little more than a week.  I do not want to say anything in case it does not work out (health and/or weather) but I will post if it is successful.  As an aside, I do think there are some countries that are working on treatment modalities that are not motivated by profit.  Taiwan is one that comes to mind.  They do not have the resources of big pharma, yet they are trying.  I am sorry you are frustrated and I relate to your frustration.  Sometimes I feel the same frustration with politics.  But I am relatively powerless to change the situation.  It is the same thing with the health care system.  For me, I think the retreat to nature (and meditation) is the best answer.  I am glad you will be back in the calm of your mountains soon.

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

I totally agree. I think the majority of us are walking around with a phone or device glued to our hands 24/7. The mountains and woods literally renew my spirit without fail. Meditation is much easier for me there, but I am practicing to find "that place" no matter where I am at. Someone I know built a deprivation/floating tank. Some of the information I have read and that they have shared is incredibly interesting to me. Hope your hiking even is a "go". I will be back in my mountains tomorrow evening or Thursday morning at the latest..Hugs, M

Kazenmax's picture
Kazenmax
Posts: 366
Joined: Feb 2016

I dont know... I think you could say the same about anything in our capitalist society. The almighty dollar reigns over us all. I don’t believe that there’s a cure out there and we are not getting it. I think cancer is different for each and every one of us. Ultimately you have to be your own advocate for your health. You do have to research and you do have to ask questions. But if you do not have confidence that you are getting the right treatment, you have to look for it. I feel confident that my doctors are doing all they can to cure me as I am also doing all I can to be cured.

All hospitals in the US are industries. They are for profit. If there was a cure, you better believe someone would be making money on it. look How far research has come in controlling AIDs. I believe that there will someday be a vaccination against these diseases. Then something else will be cause death ...Because that is inevitable.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

I agree totally. There's isn't a 'cure' for cancer. there will be a number of cures because each cancer is so different and each patient is different.

The collusion it would take for all the people in the research industry around the world to cover it up if there actually was a cure would be insane. What would be the incentive for countries with healthcare coverage to do that? Rich drug company owners who know there is a cure wouldn't allow their loved ones to die from it. The government likes live taxpayers who are able to work, not dead or disabled ones. Whatever drug company comes up with the cure(s) would have such credibility they could offer all kinds of drugs for anything and people would buy from them. They'd be a lot better off and making more money. I just can't imagine the number of people who would have to stay silent and allow people to die every day from cancer if they knew there was a cure. The level of evil would be unbelievable. They should make a movie about it. 

Cancer can do things like make itself immune to chemotherapy over time. It can evolve and be more aggressive. As I've mentioned before, I have a number of tumours in my left lung. All respond to the immunotherapy excpet one that continues to grow. This is the kind of things researchers are up against. It can spread wherever it wants although it usually follows a certain path. There's no for sure or definites to it. 

A woman in my cancer support group here in town has a husband who is dying of cancer, I can't rememeber which one but it's not colon. They treated him a few months ago with what's supposed to be a very successful treatment. It involves stem cells. For some reason it made the cancer very aggressive and the doctors are scratching their heads because it should have cured him and now there's nothing left to offer. 

It sucks and it's horrible but it's too complicated to find a cure easily. As huamns we always want something to blame but I hinestly don't think there's anyone to blame here. 

Jan

myAZmountain
Posts: 283
Joined: Apr 2018

I share your skepticism about the profit aspect of cancer care--look at all the recent busts of pharmaceutical companie owners/CEO's and opioids!  Another aspect i do not understand is why other professionals that are involved with treating cancer patients, like dieticians, interventional radiologists etc. are not more informed about cancer  and cancer drugs? The dietician at my infusion center pushed cakes, ice cream, cookies etc. etc. The radiologist who put in ports had no idea about the increased risk of cancer patients to develop blood clots, or that the suppressed immune system might not work with dissolvable stitches.  I suggest reading How to Starve Cancer by Jan McClelland if you get a chance Mojo, she was so badly misdiagnosed by the wonderful NHS--but her research is incredible! Strength, love and hugs!!

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

I truly don't understand why dieticians and related staff involved in the care of a cancer patient are not educated more. Dieticians seem to be clueless at times. Google searches and cancer boards rendered more useful information than they could give. Thank you for the suggested reading. I intend to find it when I return home this week. Strength, love and hugs right back over the mountain..M

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1117
Joined: Feb 2015

I had an experience that I have mentioned here a few times.  In hospital overnight, got a huge bill, my insurance covered less than 10%.  Almost wound up back in the hospital from a heart attack seeing it. Called the hospital and they told me they were accepting the payment from insurance as final due to a contract.  I told them just bill me that rate and I could spend 30 days in ICU for less than what I pay for health insurance during the year.  And also asked how canl they stay in business collecting 10 cents on the dollar.  I would be out of businsess under that model.  So I totally get the outrage in this.  

It is absolute BS though I can buy the same drug in Canada or Mexico when I am traveling at pennies on the dollar compared to the US.  We had to pick up drugs a few times when traveling and they were less than a co-pay we had with our insurance back home.  I understand the marketing and getting what the market will pay, but c'mon.  And I am a capitialist at heart, but the margins are crazy.  

You probably have seen Steven Brill article in TIME.  Link is here If not it is another eye opening read.   Adam Ruins Everything did a piece on the craziness of billing.  I think if someone had a cure, it would be out there and a ton of money to be made. The rules and regulations to get from theory to market is crazy.  We have people dying, speed up some the trials or let people take a risk. And I find it hard to believe this https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/12/health/cancer-drug-trials-encounter-a-problem-too-few-patients.html - perhaps ease the trials a bit.  Obivously the plural of anecdote is not data and controls are needed, but not enough people with cancer who can be in trials?  C'mon.  I understand there should be protections and overseeing things in general, (including the FDA) but the costs of getting a drug to market is nuts.   Every drug out there has the same warning label that has been copied and pasted, with some modifications.  Unreal.  

But anyway, in general, I am of the opinion of JJ, I do not think cures are being held off the market for a variety of reasons, even though there have been instances of drugs being supressed.as you mentioned    I admit I have tendency to be naive and want to believe humans are better than that.  Of course there will be excpetions to that - we see it everywhere where profit is ahead of everything.  But a cure would also be a cash cow.   For example,  ff reshi mushroom worked, but it needed to be a special blend grown in certiain conditions, they could make a mint.  The same applies for other things, such as Hyperbarics (a subject I love and believe in) and Keto Diet.  Let's say The Keto diet would only be approved with certain specific guidelines, sources and precise mixtures.  Blue Apron from Memorial Sloan Kettering would be a huge money maker.  I would not risk buying from grocery store if it was keeping me alive.  As an aside, what is interesting is that the author of the book  mentioned AIDS.  (echoing Kazenmax a bit, but it instantly jumped out at me based on the year of the book and me losing friends to AIDS when it all started in the 80s and seeing how treatments changed.)

These are tough diseases.  Even if chemotherapy works, very often it will stop working.  My doctors have been really great with everything - answering every quesiton, a ton of recommendations and tips, from exercise to intergrative medicine and running tests, so I am seeing it from a different lens which I readily admit.

In this day and age we see so many breakthroughs across the board and funding for so many diseases.  My watch has more power than what was available when we put people on the moon.  It is really difficult not to get angry in all this, for many of the reasons you mention.  We are bombarded with information about cures and scams.  And are never sure what the truth is.  And I get angry at myself at not finding everything out there or dismissing things and perhaps killing myself because of it.  I have pretty much ignored drinking my own urine to cure cancer.  Am I stupid not to do it?  Amd I arrogant?  And I get angry.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life-stories/im-drinking-urine-cure-cancer-6673361

And I come around now to Sandia's point - do something to ease the anger if you can.  Stress and anger have their places, but at some point the negative effects kick in.  (But feel free to ramp it up as needed.)  I go running (which I hate, but beginning to like kind of since it has helped keep me alive) or do something indulgent as needed.  Buy a more expensive meal than normal, things like that.  I love the water, oceans, rivers, whatever, and now the weather is warming up I have a chance to eat outside at some places where I can see water.  Yes it is the Hudson in NY, so not the white sand beaches with blue water of other places, but it still works.  

I hate seeing you having all this on your plate.  Your name alone is what I think of you.   Be angry as needed.  Use it as a focus for the Warrior in you.  But your positive attitude and strength you have expressed in your posts from the beginning are also great assets in all of this.

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

Nor will it ever to me. I'm a "fixer"..someone who dies inside to see another hurting or being taken advantage of. I have had to reign that in and realize that I can't save the world. I am in a much better place than I was three years ago when I was fighting to keep my husband alive as he fought this ***** of a disease. I realized some things just don't make sense and I will never have the answers or be able to fix it all.  I'm not perfect with it, but I have learned to let the thoughts come, (and most of the time, lol) let them go. Getting the port put in and doing chemo was an extreme struggle for me. I could not look at the port most days. Having it and doing chemo went against the grain of my soul and spirit. They would not consider me for a liver resection without doing chemo first. If I wanted to live, I had no choice..the tumors were large and I would have died. I now know what my husband felt when he said, "I'm so tired of being sick and tired." I thought I knew at the time but nobody will ever know until they wear the hat. It is wonderful that you have had such a supportive treatment team. None of my doctors would discuss alternative therapies, supplements, etc. If a tumor were found in me tomorrow, I know that chemo is not the route for me. I think we are all unique like snowflakes but similar in so many ways...the human existence.  I truly respect everyone's choices they make for themselves. Of course I don't want to have a recurrence but the thought of having chemo again scares me more. You would think the threat of being Stage IV and not pursuing chemo would fill me with fear. It has been the opposite. I have more peace than I have had in the past six months. I intend to honor and indulge my "gift of existence" every singel day. I hope everyone here finds that moment of peace somewhere in their journey...Hugs, M

Butt's picture
Butt
Posts: 326
Joined: May 2018

There are a lot of different countries with completly different medical  systems. I do not believe they hold back their research and meds. They simply don t have anything new but working on it. I read that Keytruda when it started to look promising was approved very fast in the US. I think they charge a lot on the US because of different reasons and one of them is that they reinvest in their research and generate many clinical trails. 

mojogirl67's picture
mojogirl67
Posts: 263
Joined: Oct 2018

While I don't think there is a known "cure" in hiding, I do think drug companies smother many promising trials. They are about making money at the end of the day. There are many reports on the small amount put back into research and trials verses the huge profit margin these companies have. I hope you are doing well in your treatment Butt...hugs, M

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1117
Joined: Feb 2015

>now know what my husband felt when he said, "I'm so tired of being sick and tired." I thought I knew at the time but nobody will ever know until they wear the hat. 

I was going to post something like that in my longer post.  No matter how much empathy you have, it is totally different when you get cancer and go through the treatments.  I try to explain the twilight effect I have, and maybe have gotten better, but it is like I am zombie caught between awake and sleep for a few days.  That is almost the hardest part of it because it last's so long.  But I describe it to another cancer patient, and they get it.

 I am at the point where I look at a chemo pouch I have in the house and I start getting queasy.  I keep it out of sight.  The port aint much better when I see it sometimes. And making a decision to do what is right, regardless of the outcome, with regards to treatment is never to be criticized.  So having the port removed and carrying on without that reminder is something I totally get.  Emotionally being stronger is paramount.  

 

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