High calorie, low sugar food suggestions

Me again . . .

Sorry.

The topic for today is high calorie low sugar food suggestions.  Anyone have a short or long list/website with recipes, ideas to help someone like my husband who was on the slimmer side before our issues surfaced and is losing weight, in spite of eating whatever/whenever he can?   He's always had a hard time gaining weight or keeping it on . . . but his weight goes down faster than we can pack it on.  He hasn't had any nausea, etc. and his appetite is pretty good.  He just can't seem to keep any weight on him.  He's drinking the Ensure shakes, and I'm trying my best to cook meals he enjoys . . . but, we're finding it difficult to keep him from losing weight.  The cancer clinic told him his job is to make sure he doesn't lose weight and we were holding it pretty steady but these last few days (this week after his last treatment, last Thursday) has been a challenge.  He was 176 at the clinic last week (granted, fully clothed); but this morning he was down to 171.  Yesterday, he was 173 . . . so, I'm trying to try and get it under control before he loses any more.

Any ideas?

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Comments

  • Evarista
    Evarista Member Posts: 332 Member
    Not all Ensure is the same

    Have you reviewed their complete product line?  https://ensure.com/nutrition-products Ensure Enlive, Ensure High Protein, etc.?  More protein than the the original You may have to order these from Amazon or Walmart.  I used a lot of Lean Cuisine products, focusing on those that had 16 gm or more of protein per serving.  Easy to prepare and as long as you microwave them well, they made it easy to comply with my neurtopenic diet.

    P.S. If you add your new questions to one of your existing threads, it is easier for others to see your "whole story", rather than having to click back and forth. The thread will pop to the top of the list and been seen just as easily.  Good luck.

  • Simon24
    Simon24 Member Posts: 45
    American Cancer Society Cookbook

    I found a book in our cancer center library called "What to Eat During Cancer Treatment" put out by the American Cancer Society.  It organizes the recipes according to symptoms.  They have recipes and suggestions for nausea, diarrhea, constipation, sore mouth and difficulty swalling, taste alterations, and unintentional weight loss.  During my husbands treatment he had three of the symptoms and I thought the book was helpful.  Amazon has new and used copies and even Kindle editions.  I'm not sure about low sugar recipes though.  I think you can adapt them to meet your needs.  Also, we used a lot of Ensure High Protein during my husband's treatment and our cancer center used to have Ensure coupons that they offered to the patients.  You may want to ask at your treatment center if they have coupons you can have.  Good luck.  I hope you find some great recipes.

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 782 Member
    eat a little of everything

    Unbreaded fried meats with the skin on - chicken, beef, pork or my favorite lamb. Lean muscle meat, especially beef, can have a relatively high carb content. I also use almond butter, which unlike some peanut butters, has no sugars. Wegman’s has it at a very good price. I am not proposing you go with an Atkins (ketogenic) diet. The best ways to avoid sugars in no softdrinks or fruit juices, cookies cakes or pastries. I love bread and eat it in moderation despite my my high triglycerides.

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 782 Member
    What I ate this morning

    Sounds keto but that is not my intent.

    being a southerner born and bred I love food, love to cook and love southern ingredients. This can be varied extensively. I use whatever is available that day. I worked for a French company and spent a lot of time there. I was surprised how many southern dishes have French, especially Norman, origins. Fresh trout from my creek is one of my favorite breakfasts.

    • Chopped kale, chard, collards or spinach ( a mix is good)
    • small salad tomatoes (we call them “Tommy Toes”)
    • shallot or scallions and a clove of garlic
    • generous amount of butter (the french love butter)
    • 4-8 ounces of pork side meat or thick bacon (smoked or not smoked - wegmans has both and Costco has great pork side meats). Cut into 1/4 inch thick by 1 inch squares. Use a lot its good for you. The French love pork belly as do the Mexicans.
    • A generous portion of Craisins or preferably fresh chopped cranberries. Remember these have sugar So don’t overdo it. A good alternative is capers.
    • Small handful of pecans or walnuts. I like a mixture of raw local black walnuts( too strong for many people) and raw local pecans.  Macadamia if you can find it is great as are brazil nuts (Raw)
    • 4 eggs (yellows cooked done if you are on chemo).
    • salt and pepper. Maybe fresh corriander ( often called Cilantro but I prefer the Indian name Corriander) or basil. Rosemary is also great in fritatas. Just season to your taste.

     

    i just cook it all up, meats first with grease drained, butter added, then whip the eggs which are poured over it to make a fritata. Kinda looks like a pancake. Enough to share. Really good. For the more adventurous top it off with southern redeye coffee gravy which also originated in France. We southerners know how to eat!

  • Rocquie
    Rocquie Member Posts: 859 Member
    High Calorie Food

    Dawn, a hospital dietician recommended to me, when I was unintentionally losing weight: cheese, butter, peanut butter, avodados, whole milk, sour cream, cream cheese, baked potatoes (topped with extras), rice, gravy, eggs, raisins and dried fruits (be cautious about sugars), coconut. Nuts, trail mix, and granola are good if not having problems with mouth sores.

    Good luck! You are being a wonderful caregiver.

    Hugs,

    Rocquie

     

  • Rocquie
    Rocquie Member Posts: 859 Member
    ShadyGuy said:

    What I ate this morning

    Sounds keto but that is not my intent.

    being a southerner born and bred I love food, love to cook and love southern ingredients. This can be varied extensively. I use whatever is available that day. I worked for a French company and spent a lot of time there. I was surprised how many southern dishes have French, especially Norman, origins. Fresh trout from my creek is one of my favorite breakfasts.

    • Chopped kale, chard, collards or spinach ( a mix is good)
    • small salad tomatoes (we call them “Tommy Toes”)
    • shallot or scallions and a clove of garlic
    • generous amount of butter (the french love butter)
    • 4-8 ounces of pork side meat or thick bacon (smoked or not smoked - wegmans has both and Costco has great pork side meats). Cut into 1/4 inch thick by 1 inch squares. Use a lot its good for you. The French love pork belly as do the Mexicans.
    • A generous portion of Craisins or preferably fresh chopped cranberries. Remember these have sugar So don’t overdo it. A good alternative is capers.
    • Small handful of pecans or walnuts. I like a mixture of raw local black walnuts( too strong for many people) and raw local pecans.  Macadamia if you can find it is great as are brazil nuts (Raw)
    • 4 eggs (yellows cooked done if you are on chemo).
    • salt and pepper. Maybe fresh corriander ( often called Cilantro but I prefer the Indian name Corriander) or basil. Rosemary is also great in fritatas. Just season to your taste.

     

    i just cook it all up, meats first with grease drained, butter added, then whip the eggs which are poured over it to make a fritata. Kinda looks like a pancake. Enough to share. Really good. For the more adventurous top it off with southern redeye coffee gravy which also originated in France. We southerners know how to eat!

    Shady

    I"m coming to breakfast at your house tomorrow. What time do we eat?

    Smile Rocquie

     

  • Thank you, all . . . so many

    Thank you, all . . . so many awesome suggestions.  Will be sure to check them all out.  THANK YOU!!!!   

    We used the Ensure . . . after Terry's surgery in April . . . probably OVERused them, as he got sick of them.  So, when I saw he was losing too much weight, I wanted him to start using them again.  He took one in his lunch yesterday and said it gave him stomach aches . . . not nausea (thank God we haven't been plagued with that yet, hopefully never will) . . . I LOVED Shady's recipe . . . . . WOW, what a cook!!!  That sounded really good . . . chemo "patient" or not, right?  

    We go grocery shopping every Sunday . . . so I'm going to make my list out tomorrow to include the things you all suggested.  Don't know how to thank you.

    Question for you all, though . . . Have you all been advised NOT to eat sugar?  Our cancer care center doesn't have a nutritionist, believe it or not.  I think that's shameful.  Anyway . . . the PA we met with before we started treatment told Terry, like I said, NOT to lose ANY weight.  His BMI is unvelievably low . . . Terry's all muscle.  Always has been.  Has always been able to eat and never gain much weight.  Anyhow, she told him to eat whatever sounded good to him and said it was okay to eat a piece of cake or pie . . . cookies . . . just not in excess. 

    Just wondering how strict sugar intake should be during treatment.  

    Oooops . . . my love just pulled into the driveway.  Making Swiss steak and baked taters for him tonight.  Hope he can eat a healthy amount.

    Talk again soon.

     

    Thanks again!

    Dawn

  • yesyes2
    yesyes2 Member Posts: 591
    Sugar intake.

    Hi Dawn, our cancer center has never said anything to restrict sugar intake in chemo patients.  The feeling usually is it's more important to just eat and not worry about sugar intake, fat or calories.  When I was on RCHOP I had absolutly no food restrictions with the acception of grapefruit.  As I had chemo during the winter I didn't eat fresh raw fruits but did eat fresh veggies and had no problems.  My cancer doctors even said I could eat sushi, as I specificly asked about it.  As long as my counts were good I had no restrictions.  We went on several trips for get away weekends, ate out at least 3 times a week.  When I started with mouth sores I went on a soft/liquid diet.  Because of neulasta I was never neutropinic.  Maybe I was just lucky not to get ill but I have had heavy chemo twice, NHL and Breast Cancer and neither times was given any food restrictions.  Just besure food is cooked properly, well washed and freshly prepared.  Most important, stay away from small children and sick people.

     

     

     

  • Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3
    Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3 Member Posts: 3,736 Member
    unknown said:

    Thank you, all . . . so many

    Thank you, all . . . so many awesome suggestions.  Will be sure to check them all out.  THANK YOU!!!!   

    We used the Ensure . . . after Terry's surgery in April . . . probably OVERused them, as he got sick of them.  So, when I saw he was losing too much weight, I wanted him to start using them again.  He took one in his lunch yesterday and said it gave him stomach aches . . . not nausea (thank God we haven't been plagued with that yet, hopefully never will) . . . I LOVED Shady's recipe . . . . . WOW, what a cook!!!  That sounded really good . . . chemo "patient" or not, right?  

    We go grocery shopping every Sunday . . . so I'm going to make my list out tomorrow to include the things you all suggested.  Don't know how to thank you.

    Question for you all, though . . . Have you all been advised NOT to eat sugar?  Our cancer care center doesn't have a nutritionist, believe it or not.  I think that's shameful.  Anyway . . . the PA we met with before we started treatment told Terry, like I said, NOT to lose ANY weight.  His BMI is unvelievably low . . . Terry's all muscle.  Always has been.  Has always been able to eat and never gain much weight.  Anyhow, she told him to eat whatever sounded good to him and said it was okay to eat a piece of cake or pie . . . cookies . . . just not in excess. 

    Just wondering how strict sugar intake should be during treatment.  

    Oooops . . . my love just pulled into the driveway.  Making Swiss steak and baked taters for him tonight.  Hope he can eat a healthy amount.

    Talk again soon.

     

    Thanks again!

    Dawn

    Diet

    Dawn,

    My oncologist, a Stanford/UCLA grad with five Board Certifications, told my wife and I the same thing: That while on chemo I should eat whatever I felt like, no restrictions.  I never took Prednisone, so am unaware as regards that drug.  Years ago there was a long-running debate here over whether antioxidants should be consumed, some saying yes, others no.  Journal articles come down on both sides.  But coffee, tea, tomatoes, and many other things have a lot of antioxidants in them, and no one recommends against consuming those on chemo.  My oncologist said guzzle green tea all day long if I felt like it (and I did so).

    Chemically-induced aneroxia on chemo is not uncommon at all.  Serious weight loss is also common, so much so that most chemo drugs recommend dose adjustment for each 10% of body weight gained or lost. I went long-term mostly on Ensure and similiar products, slthough I never totally went over a day or so without some amount of solid food.

    Food fetishes/cravings are also common. I knew a guy who, years ago as a teen with lymphoma, said he would only eat pot pie for months. I myself would only eat french fries at times...sounds odd, given the greasiness, but thats all I wanted.  My anorexia was not nausea-related, since I never had nausea once my entire six month on chemo, just an adversion to the idea of eating.

    Again, I've never heard any doctor speak or write against eating sugar on chemo.

    max

     

    My hometown of Charleston claims to be the birthplace of commonly eating shrimp and grits together.  But, Charlestonians also claim that the Ashley and Cooper Rivers join together in Charleston Harbor to form the Atlantic Ocean.... 

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 782 Member
    Breakfast would be great !!

    but having just finished chemo yesterday I am still a bit under the weather. Unsteady on my feet (wobbly in fact), extremely constipated (despite laxatives), fatigued and can’t sleep more than 2-3 hours at a time. And of course I am bald and my head sweats. “Gramp why is your head wet?” The trout are probably glad for that! But their time is coming.

    My wife occasionally makes shrimp and grits. I love redeye gravy as my Father used to make it. He would fry squares of old ham (country ham) make the gravy and put the mess over my Mom’s biscuits. Really really good. Dad made his gravy without milk. Some people like the milk in it. Try it both ways. If you are in the outerbanks, the Outer Banks Brewhouse in KDH has shrimp and grits made with redeye gravy. I warn you that sometimes they are good, sometimes mediocre. The servings are huge. Their shrimp and grits appetizer is more that a meal. The full dish can only be eaten by a very hungry person. There are sooooooooo many recipes for the dish and results vary from cook to cook and by how old it is when served that you never know what you are going to get in a restaurant. Some totally different things are often both called shrimp and grits. In my experience the low country of South Carolina is your best bet for shrimp and grits.

    in the summers I am in the mountains not too far from Rocqui and Max. Asheville NC which is in between us is famous for biscuits and redeye gravy. Andrew Zimmern on Travel Channel ( either “Bizarre Foods” or “Delicious Destinations” I can’t remember which) dedicated an entire show to food in Asheville with a focus on biscuits and gravy. He raved about it.

    Remember, there are 2 types of grits (or if you prefer, polenta). One is essentially just coursely ground whole dried corn. Thats what I like. The other is hominy grits which is what you will find in restaurants, instant grits etc. Hominy grits are more nutitious and more easily digested. The key to  good grits is going straight from the stove to the plate. Freshness is everything in grits. Grits that sit around all day are, in my humble opinion, disgusting unless cut into cakes and fried in butter. Whole hominy and pork stew (pozole) is a great stew and the state dish of New Mexico after stuffed sopapilas (sp?). The process of making hominy is very interesting if you care to look it up. It originally involved ashes from the fireplace and rainwater but now people just buy lye. The process is similar to making lutefisk which I also used to enjoy at Christmas when I lived in Minnesota. Eating corn made into hominy prevents beri beri which is why hominy was invented. Native Americans taught the colonists who were dying of beri beri how to prevent it by turning corn into hominy. Thats my story and I’m sticking to it!

  • Evarista
    Evarista Member Posts: 332 Member
    unknown said:

    Thank you, all . . . so many

    Thank you, all . . . so many awesome suggestions.  Will be sure to check them all out.  THANK YOU!!!!   

    We used the Ensure . . . after Terry's surgery in April . . . probably OVERused them, as he got sick of them.  So, when I saw he was losing too much weight, I wanted him to start using them again.  He took one in his lunch yesterday and said it gave him stomach aches . . . not nausea (thank God we haven't been plagued with that yet, hopefully never will) . . . I LOVED Shady's recipe . . . . . WOW, what a cook!!!  That sounded really good . . . chemo "patient" or not, right?  

    We go grocery shopping every Sunday . . . so I'm going to make my list out tomorrow to include the things you all suggested.  Don't know how to thank you.

    Question for you all, though . . . Have you all been advised NOT to eat sugar?  Our cancer care center doesn't have a nutritionist, believe it or not.  I think that's shameful.  Anyway . . . the PA we met with before we started treatment told Terry, like I said, NOT to lose ANY weight.  His BMI is unvelievably low . . . Terry's all muscle.  Always has been.  Has always been able to eat and never gain much weight.  Anyhow, she told him to eat whatever sounded good to him and said it was okay to eat a piece of cake or pie . . . cookies . . . just not in excess. 

    Just wondering how strict sugar intake should be during treatment.  

    Oooops . . . my love just pulled into the driveway.  Making Swiss steak and baked taters for him tonight.  Hope he can eat a healthy amount.

    Talk again soon.

     

    Thanks again!

    Dawn

    No sugar while taking Prednisone

    Only time I was told to restrict sugar was during my Prednisone days...Then it was very important.  Other than that, for non-diabetic, no particular issue. Just be sensible with it.

    Shady:  do you do shrimp & grits?  If so, I'm coming over...

    Edit to add:  the issue with Prednisone is that it will cause your blood glucose to rise. That can push you into the diabetic zone.  If that happens, you then need to be treated for diabetes in addition to everything else.  My blood glucose doubled in 24 hours after my first Prednisone and I was cautioned strongly to restrict sugar intake while taking it.  Managed to stay below 180, but that's still pretty high. R-EPOCH patients get Pred daily for 5 days, so this is probably a bigger issue for us than for R-CHOP patients.

  • Evarista
    Evarista Member Posts: 332 Member
    ShadyGuy said:

    Breakfast would be great !!

    but having just finished chemo yesterday I am still a bit under the weather. Unsteady on my feet (wobbly in fact), extremely constipated (despite laxatives), fatigued and can’t sleep more than 2-3 hours at a time. And of course I am bald and my head sweats. “Gramp why is your head wet?” The trout are probably glad for that! But their time is coming.

    My wife occasionally makes shrimp and grits. I love redeye gravy as my Father used to make it. He would fry squares of old ham (country ham) make the gravy and put the mess over my Mom’s biscuits. Really really good. Dad made his gravy without milk. Some people like the milk in it. Try it both ways. If you are in the outerbanks, the Outer Banks Brewhouse in KDH has shrimp and grits made with redeye gravy. I warn you that sometimes they are good, sometimes mediocre. The servings are huge. Their shrimp and grits appetizer is more that a meal. The full dish can only be eaten by a very hungry person. There are sooooooooo many recipes for the dish and results vary from cook to cook and by how old it is when served that you never know what you are going to get in a restaurant. Some totally different things are often both called shrimp and grits. In my experience the low country of South Carolina is your best bet for shrimp and grits.

    in the summers I am in the mountains not too far from Rocqui and Max. Asheville NC which is in between us is famous for biscuits and redeye gravy. Andrew Zimmern on Travel Channel ( either “Bizarre Foods” or “Delicious Destinations” I can’t remember which) dedicated an entire show to food in Asheville with a focus on biscuits and gravy. He raved about it.

    Remember, there are 2 types of grits (or if you prefer, polenta). One is essentially just coursely ground whole dried corn. Thats what I like. The other is hominy grits which is what you will find in restaurants, instant grits etc. Hominy grits are more nutitious and more easily digested. The key to  good grits is going straight from the stove to the plate. Freshness is everything in grits. Grits that sit around all day are, in my humble opinion, disgusting unless cut into cakes and fried in butter. Whole hominy and pork stew (pozole) is a great stew and the state dish of New Mexico after stuffed sopapilas (sp?). The process of making hominy is very interesting if you care to look it up. It originally involved ashes from the fireplace and rainwater but now people just buy lye. The process is similar to making lutefisk which I also used to enjoy at Christmas when I lived in Minnesota. Eating corn made into hominy prevents beri beri which is why hominy was invented. Native Americans taught the colonists who were dying of beri beri how to prevent it by turning corn into hominy. Thats my story and I’m sticking to it!

    Dealing with constipation

    Many years ago, our university med center Geriatrics Clinic gave us this recipe for our elderly parents suffering with constipation.  It worked wonders and we have shared it with many over the years (and they still thank us, although we do not take credit).  I started using it religiously after serious issues with my first round of chemo. Forgive me if I've posted this to you before, but maybe others have not seen it:

    In a blender:  1) make a powder of one part fiber cereal (I like FiberOne, MIL likes AllBran); 2) blend in one part applesauce; 3) blend in one part prune juice.  The result is a paste.  Eat two heaping tablespoons each morning (only one for the non-chemo crowd).  Make only enough for one week at a time; store refrigerated.  Do not "double-dip" your spoon (use fresh spoon for each serving). For "extra strength" version, use wheat bran instead of fiber cereal (hard to find in groceries; we order from Walmart or Amazon).

    I am a newbie to shrimp & grits.  So far I've had them at Tupelo Honey in Asheville & the Sprouter Inn in Beaufort.  Plus a number of places nearer to home. No bad ones, although they vary a lot. Haven't tried to cook 'em, but may consider that once the weather cools. Be well.  

  • PBL
    PBL Member Posts: 336 Member
    Magnesium-rich water

    Drinking plenty of water - and especially making sure you pick a magnesium-rich mineral water - can make a world of difference with chemo-induced constipation. You seem to be eating your share of green veggies, so I won't insist on that. Oh, and maybe steer clear of rice and chocolate for a few more weeks (you're not likely to develop Beriberi before you're through R-CHOP!).

    PBL

     

  • Unknown
    edited June 2018 #15
    My husband's tastes for

    My husband's tastes for different foods, I think, sound so boring compared to all of yours.  He's always been a meat and potatoes kind of guy.  So, over the years, I've never had a problem keeping him happy.  I've always considered him "unique" and special in a lot of ways for many many reasons . . . so this whole chemo thing, again, is no exception when it comes to the general personna of my Terry.  From what we read and what we imagined . . . we envisioned him at the porecelain throne, every half hour with one end of him competing with the other for more attention there.  This hasn't been easy on him . . . OR me, but he literally has had no real issues except for the devastating loss of his hair and some significant fatigue, especially the week after chemo treatments.  But, other than that . . . (knock on wood), we have been relatively "blessed" in not having much else to report as so many of you have.  While it IS true that everyone responds to all this so individually . . . it is a bit like waiting for another shoe to drop, you know?

    The food thing . . . has been a bit of a challenge for me in trying to keep him satisfied and happy with what I make; but, I have to say . . . working full-time is an added challenge for me to come home and cook a whole lot of anything . . . chemo or not . . . I enjoy it when I have time; but . . . when I don't, it's pot pies, BLT's, or hot dogs.  For me to make that Swiss steak last night . . . . was a lot of work but because it was a Friday night, it wasn't so bad.  

    God . . . I wish I lived closer to Shady, Rocquie and Max . . . I would PAY you to cook for us with all those tasty temptations.  

    So glad to have the consensus that it was okay for me to continue giving Terry what he enjoys in the way of cakes, pies, etc.  THAT was also told to us when we started all this . . . that it was more important for him to get those calories in him than anything else (within reason, obviously).  So, whewwww!  I have always LOVED, LOVED baking and he's always so enjoyed my banana cream pies and chocolate cake.  

    So thanks, everybody!  

    One thing I wanted to ask you guys, as well, was . . . Have you had trouble dealing with exhaustion related to ANY activity in the summer sun/heat????  I went to get my hair done today and when I got home, Terry was exhausted just after filling the bird feeder and birdbath in the backyard.  It's only 78 or so today, much cooler than last weekend, but after an hour nap and doing just those few things, he's napping again.  AND, I could tell he was literally "wiped".  We had our last chemo hit on the 14th of this month and he felt so good this morning . . . but now is completely exhausted.

    Hearing that yesyes2 never became neutropenic while on Neulasta gives me a sliver of hope none of this will be delayed as long as they give it to him each time; but did it also make you feel this "wiped"?  I'm thinking that this added fatigue this cycle may just be from the chemo and that it builds with each treatment and not be from the Neulasta . . . I was just curious.  THAT was the only change in his treatment regimine; other than the doc upped his Red Devil and his Vincristine because she said his liver tests had bounded back from the first CMP she ran before his first hit.  

    Any thoughts in regard to that?  Think it could be that little bump they gave him and not necessarily from the Neulasta?  I thought the Neulasta would boost his WBC's and give him an added rebound by now.  Not so???

    Thanks for whatever take you may have on that front whenever you're bored.

    Have a great weekend, guys and gals!  Thanks, once again, for all the suggestions!

     

  • PBL
    PBL Member Posts: 336 Member
    Fatigue

    Dawn,

    Fatigue is to be expected, and nothing to worry about. It is not commensurate with activity level. As long as Terry knows to lie down whenever it hits him (it did me several times a day - still does, to a lesser degree, two years after my last R-CHOP), he should be fine. This is caused by the chemotherapy, not by the Neulasta. Expect the fatigue and other side effects to increase as he gets more infusions. He will start recovering within a couple of weeks after his last dose, so hang in there.

    PBL

  • Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3
    Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3 Member Posts: 3,736 Member
    Come on down....

    I don't recall what region you live in, Afraid (if you ever stipulated), but consider yourself invited to move to the Southeast -- the rest of the world is doing so.

    Northeasterners who initially move to Florida are dubbed "Snowbirds."  Many discover there that the heat is too oppressive to live in, and then move about half way back north; these folks are "Halfbacks": they've gone half way back.  SC/NC are among the most popular choices among Halfbacks, but I have heard new arrivals in Virginia so-designated also. 

    I've always had a gift for recognizing domestic and foreign dialects, since I've lived in or visited almost everywhere, and frequently ask people in stores or wherever where they are from.  Although I grew up a Geechie, I have been told by people all over the US that 'I do not sound southern', and in fact get asked pretty frequently in SC, "where you from boy ?" When I tell them I grew up in Charleston, they look at me suspiciously, and then say, "oh, ok."  A Geechie is a white Charleston area native; not to be confused with native sea-island blacks, who are Gullah. Some people confuse geechie and gullah, but they are actually quite different, and a Charlestonian would never use those terms interchangably, especially since geechie sounds nothing like gullah.  If you have ever heard the late US Senator Fritz Hollings speak, you have heard perfect geechie spoken.  Gullah is a recognized US dialect developed by slaves, but very limited in range, mostly coastal SC and parts of coastal Georgia.  I can speak it very fluently....my aunt owned a plantation in Georgetown, SC, where I spent my summers as a young kid.  In the 1960s, she had a then-elderly maid whose parents had been slaves on the property, and I played with her grandson all the time when she would bring him to work there, and learned the dialect from them and some other individuals around Charleston.  There are Charleston and Beaufort area organizations funded to work toward the preservation of spoken gullah.

    If the person looks about 65 and sounds like they are from New Jersey, and I ask where they are from, the conversation usually goes something like, "Well, we lived in Hoboken most of our lives, and then moved to Tampa for six years, but it was too hot and the hurricanes kept blowing our motorhomes away, so we came here four years ago."

    The movie Deliverance (the whitewater scenes) was filmed about 35 miles from my house, a region that is still wilderness and extremely remote.  The whole Northeaster Georgia/NC/SC region is mostly uninhabited; occasional small town like Murphy, Cashiers, Highlands, NC.   Wal Mart and CVS can't build on sheer cliffs. 

    Newcomers are trained in detecting remote bango noises for "well being."

    max

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 782 Member
    Thanks. I am totally new to

    Thanks. I am totally new to constipation. Its a problem I never had before this chemo. Seems to be easing. Seems like the muscles in my bowels don't work the way they should. Both my constipation and fever have improved in the last 12 hours.

    I had shrimp and grits at the Tupelo Honey in Johnson City and was unimpressed. The dish varies so much from place to place and day to day. I have ordered it in places where I did not even recognize it as being shrimp and grits. Overall, I have been disappointed in Tupelo Honey though my wife likes it.

  • Rocquie
    Rocquie Member Posts: 859 Member
    edited June 2018 #19
    ShadyGuy said:

    Thanks. I am totally new to

    Thanks. I am totally new to constipation. Its a problem I never had before this chemo. Seems to be easing. Seems like the muscles in my bowels don't work the way they should. Both my constipation and fever have improved in the last 12 hours.

    I had shrimp and grits at the Tupelo Honey in Johnson City and was unimpressed. The dish varies so much from place to place and day to day. I have ordered it in places where I did not even recognize it as being shrimp and grits. Overall, I have been disappointed in Tupelo Honey though my wife likes it.

    Shady Guy

    I hope you are feeling better by now. I also never had a problem with constipation before chemo and thankfully haven't since. During my treatments, I discovered that a pediatric dose of old fashioned milk of magnesia did the trick for me without working TOO well (if you know what I mean).

    I got tickled in your post above when your grand child ask why your head was wet! They do keep us going don't they?

    When Tupelo Honey was a single restaurant in downtown Asheville, it was wonderful. We ate brunch there almost every Saturday after our granddaughter's ballet classes. Then they started opening new locations. A few years ago, they completely redesigned their menu to market more to millennials. We haven't been there in about two years now.

    My favorite Southern delicacy is our beloved Pimiento Cheese. I made a big batch this afternoon. 

    Hugs,

    Rocquie

     

     

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 782 Member
    Rocquie said:

    Shady Guy

    I hope you are feeling better by now. I also never had a problem with constipation before chemo and thankfully haven't since. During my treatments, I discovered that a pediatric dose of old fashioned milk of magnesia did the trick for me without working TOO well (if you know what I mean).

    I got tickled in your post above when your grand child ask why your head was wet! They do keep us going don't they?

    When Tupelo Honey was a single restaurant in downtown Asheville, it was wonderful. We ate brunch there almost every Saturday after our granddaughter's ballet classes. Then they started opening new locations. A few years ago, they completely redesigned their menu to market more to millennials. We haven't been there in about two years now.

    My favorite Southern delicacy is our beloved Pimiento Cheese. I made a big batch this afternoon. 

    Hugs,

    Rocquie

     

     

    Just noticed this!

    My summer home is about 40 miles east of Johnson City and 94 miles from Asheville. I need to make a pilgrimmage to Asheville and spend the day eating. Any suggestions about where to go are welcome.

    I love pimento cheese! Great as a sandwich but I love it on crackers. Being raised in Jonesborough TN I never ate in a restaurant until I was 17 years old, the first one being a Ponderosa steakhouse (bad introduction!). My Dad’s family was from southwest VA coal country. I seriously doubt they ever ate in a restaurant in their entire lives. My Grandfather, who died when I was 10, retired from the post office, and lived alone (Granny died before I was born) on a farm in an old house he had built as a young man. A dump. But he loved it. He had electricity but carried water from a pipe coming out of the hillside, had an outhouse and had never watched tv. But man he could cook! Rabbit and squirrel stew, open wood cooked bear and venison, lamb and every spring he had everyone over for ramps. All sorts of vegetables from the garden, fresh chicken, and every Thanksgiving a freshly slaughter pig and fresh sorghum and blacstrap for the cornbread. Toward the end he became so attached to his cows he refused to let them be slaughtered. It was great. He referred to bannanas and oranges as “ foreign food”. At home in Jonesborough our main diet was biscuits, an assortment of gravies, corn bread, beans of all kinds, potatoes of all kinds, a wide assortment of greens and of course tomatoes. Lots of tomatoes. Sunday was fried chicken with mashed potatoes and gravy, cole slaw and yeast roll followed by bannana pudding or cobbler ( berry or peach) with fresh cream poured on. We had the occasional meatlof, pork chop or roast beef for a break from the chicken. The kids would compete for the chicken gizzards, livers and hearts which never made it to the table. Anything that could be grown and canned. Blacberry jam and cobblers. Anything cheap or free. My favorites were killed lettuce and onions and thickened peas with small red potatos with cornbread.

    No, Tupelo Honey is not mountain food. It is for millennial yuppies to eat while pecking at their iPhones!

  • ShadyGuy said:

    Just noticed this!

    My summer home is about 40 miles east of Johnson City and 94 miles from Asheville. I need to make a pilgrimmage to Asheville and spend the day eating. Any suggestions about where to go are welcome.

    I love pimento cheese! Great as a sandwich but I love it on crackers. Being raised in Jonesborough TN I never ate in a restaurant until I was 17 years old, the first one being a Ponderosa steakhouse (bad introduction!). My Dad’s family was from southwest VA coal country. I seriously doubt they ever ate in a restaurant in their entire lives. My Grandfather, who died when I was 10, retired from the post office, and lived alone (Granny died before I was born) on a farm in an old house he had built as a young man. A dump. But he loved it. He had electricity but carried water from a pipe coming out of the hillside, had an outhouse and had never watched tv. But man he could cook! Rabbit and squirrel stew, open wood cooked bear and venison, lamb and every spring he had everyone over for ramps. All sorts of vegetables from the garden, fresh chicken, and every Thanksgiving a freshly slaughter pig and fresh sorghum and blacstrap for the cornbread. Toward the end he became so attached to his cows he refused to let them be slaughtered. It was great. He referred to bannanas and oranges as “ foreign food”. At home in Jonesborough our main diet was biscuits, an assortment of gravies, corn bread, beans of all kinds, potatoes of all kinds, a wide assortment of greens and of course tomatoes. Lots of tomatoes. Sunday was fried chicken with mashed potatoes and gravy, cole slaw and yeast roll followed by bannana pudding or cobbler ( berry or peach) with fresh cream poured on. We had the occasional meatlof, pork chop or roast beef for a break from the chicken. The kids would compete for the chicken gizzards, livers and hearts which never made it to the table. Anything that could be grown and canned. Blacberry jam and cobblers. Anything cheap or free. My favorites were killed lettuce and onions and thickened peas with small red potatos with cornbread.

    No, Tupelo Honey is not mountain food. It is for millennial yuppies to eat while pecking at their iPhones!

    You are absolutely hilarious!

    You are absolutely hilarious!  Gad . . . are you serious?  Rabbit and squirrel stew????    You can't be serious.  Yuck!