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My Recent Pathology Report

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Hi All,

I have been reading lots of your posts and some links from them and I thank all of you for these.

I got dianosed with PCa 2 yrs ago 7/2013 at age 56 after going on HRT where my PSA spiked from 3.8 to 5.3 within 30 days.
I had the 12 blind biopsy with 1 core having 1% adenocarcinoma. GS was 3+3
I went on Active Servelence with first year having an MRI with Gadolinium contrast and Transrectal Ultrasound. Nothing alarming except I had aquired a bad rash all over my body, numb right arm for 3 months, and a very bad case of dandruff.  Needless to say I could not do this again so I studied about my PCa for another year. 
I had also been seeing a Naturopathic doctor that really knows how cancer works and we were able to correct all of my NK cells and cytokines levels except IL-12.

 I became alarmed with several recent NIH research papers that showed if I had certain gene mutations (NOS3) which I most certainly did (thanks to 23andme for providing this service) I had 6.3 times chance of my PCa progressing.

 

The -786T>C promoter polymorphism of the NOS3 gene is associated with prostate cancer progression.

Another recent NIH paper showed I had 1.6 times chance of having aggressive prostate cancer.

TT genotype of SNP rs4054823 at 17p12  Inherited genetic variant predisposes to aggressive but not indolent prostate cancer (PMCID2836698)
Also my 23andme results showed I had a 5.3 times chance of developing PCa based on several gene mutations. How true.

So I sent these research papers to my Doctor (Libertino) and presented this to him and he agreed to take out my prostate via open surgery as he is better at this method and he can be more accurate if he had to take some of the nerve bundls out.  As it was he said he had removed 50% from each nerve bundle.
It was a good thing, but it may have been to late.

Here is my Pathology Report
Adenocarcinoma of Prostate with Bi-Lateral Extension into Extraprostatic soft tissue.
Tumor Site - Bilateral, mostly in peripheral zone
Weight 63 grams Size 3.5x4x3.5 cm
Gleason score - 3 +4
Terttiary Pattern - Not PResent
Severity and Extent of Tumor: 3/5 (3 being 15 - 30-%)
No Lymph Nodes were biopsied
TNM Stage pT3a, pNX, pMX
Lymphatic (small vessel) invasion:  Not Seen
PNI is present
No Tumor seen in Seminal Vesel
Margin status: Positive Inked margins: Right and Left Peripheral Prostate, Focaly Transected
Positive shaved margine - NO
Other Margins are Clear.

I am not sure what I can do at this time, but wait for my 8 weeks for my PSA and hope.
I am moving my treatment to Mass General and am confident in them.  I am also worried about radiation and Hormone Ablation Therapy.
I have been reading about some new immunotherapies like CAR T cell and I really need to not worry and just wait for my PSA in 2 weeks.

 

 

 

stoniphi's picture
stoniphi
Posts: 54
Joined: Mar 2015

...welcome to the club. So far so good. If you need radiation and/or ADT do not be afraid of the side effects. While they are annoying at times, they are not as bad as many may believe. Keep us posted with your progress.

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I appreciate your support.

 

JMS58

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3295
Joined: May 2012

JMS,

Your pathology report (Item #1) indicates that the disease escaped the gland, and in addition there was PNI (Perineural invasion; cancer growing along the nerves inside the gland), and several positive margins (cancer touching the edges of the gland).

At a minimum I would expect the doctor to begin precautionary/possibly curative radiation therapy.  I would expect him to insist on this regardless of the PSA results.  If he does not propose this, I would ask him why he is not.

max

VascodaGama's picture
VascodaGama
Posts: 3013
Joined: Nov 2010

JMS58

Welcome to the board. I am sorry for the positive margins and extracapsular extensions found by the pathologist. This together with your initial genes tests indicates that you will require extra vigilance and strike any recurrence the soonest but timely. Not many reports about having possibilities on gene mutations and I think you did well in getting such tests and diagnosis.

You have been cautious and I am surprised that your doctor has not included in the surgery protocol dissecting a number of lymph nodes for analyses. It is common in open surgeries to do so for 9 to 11 nodes. This is important in cases where the prostate is “big”. Probably the team gave prime attention to the biopsy results (with only one positive core) disregarding the possibility of extra capsular extensions.
The MRI with the gadolinium contrast also does not reliably provide a clue of such “invasion”.

I wonder if you had hyperplasia. This is a condition that pathologists address when the size of the prostate is bigger than the normal. Yours with Weight 63 grams Size 3.5x4x3.5 cm can be compared to the more typical Weight 25 grams Size 4 x 2 x 3 cm. I also cannot understand their meaning for “Severity and Extent of Tumor: 3/5 (3 being 15 - 30-%)”. Three fifths is quite extensive and does not “contrast” well with the biopsy results. A voluminous cancer Gs 7 could mean a case of micrometastases.

Your pathological stage pT3a, pNX, pMX is for recurrence risks. It is hard to certainly trust that the cancer has only spread to close extraprostatic soft tissue. In any case typical recurrences after surgery are addressed with a series of radiation sections to “zip” the prostate bed. Some doctors suggest immediate salvage treatment others chose to confirm recurrency. If such becomes your future case then I would suggest you to request the RT to include the lymph nodes.

In my lay opinion, it is still earlier to draw conclusions. The following series of PSA tests will provide you the information regarding recurrences. Many guys managed long remissions periods of ten or more years. The sequential therapies (with radiation) are well documented and we know what to expect from them, the immunotherapy is still “young” undocumented but it may be a good candidate, however it is not free of risks, and at your young age I would avoid to the maximum treatments that can prejudice your quality living, unless it is absolutely necessary.

We PCa survivors suffer more from treatment side effects than from the cancer itself.

Best wishes and hopes for remission.

VGama

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I made a typo on the Prostae Gland weight.
The two doctors I saw that were to perform the surgery looked at my gleason score of 3+3 and my MRI with contrast and even showed me statistics from Memorial Sloan Kettering that only 1% of the patients with my gleason score had lymph node involvement so they decided it was not necessary.

Hind site I wish they had.
I remember the doctors visitng me in my room after surgery and they were very positive and said we only had to remove 50% of each nerve bundle.
I did not realize it at the time, but that must have meant he could feel some hardness on both lateral sides of my prostate.

Do they do ink staining immediately after removal while still in surgery to see if there are any positive ink margins?
I was wondering why they would remove 50% of nerve bundles unless they saw something in the staining.

 

JMS

 

Old Salt
Posts: 720
Joined: Aug 2014

Vasco wrote:

We PCa survivors suffer more from treatment side effects than from the cancer itself.

This is a bit misleading.

Even when treated according to current standards of care, the more serious prostate cancers (higher Gleason scores) can lead to very unhappy endings.

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Thanks Max

I know I will most likely be going through Radiation Therapy.
I guess I will have to research this now.
I am moving my treatment to Mass Gen Hospital so I do feel I will be in very good hands.

How many radiation sessions am I looking at?

I will do my due diligence and research my treatment options.

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3295
Joined: May 2012

JM,

To some extend, Vasco answered your question for me.  There is a line of thought in salvage therapies for prostate cancer that suggests holding remaining treatments as long as is reasonable, which some studies show sometimes extends overall life expectancy for highly indolent or dormant disease.  The question is always, "How long would be too long ?"

The thinking in applying radiation now would be that all evidence available from the pathologist's analysis of the removed gland suggests that there are still prostate cancer cells in you, and radiation would likely kill them before they wander off to farther locales in your body.

If I were you, I would hash all this out with the doctors at Mass General.  I would demand to speak with a radiation oncologist, and any other experts they send your way. And get the opinion of your surgeon also; he has insights most likely as well.  A "medical oncologist" is a non-radiation guy, meaning an oncologist who treats with drugs, verses radiation. That is, a doctor who would direct any hormonal therapy or chemo, but you are undoubtedly, worse case scenario, years or even decades away from ever needing chemo.

Like Vasco, I would question the decision to not remove nodes during the surgery, although that ship has sailed at this point.

Why the doc removed part of the erectile nerve bundle verses all of it is another question I would have him answer.

I have no idea how much radiation you will be recommended.  For guys with the gland still in place, it is usually 38 treatments, at around 76 Gr ("Gray," the dose of radiation delivered).   For salvage therapy (also called "Second-line therapy"), I am unfamiliar, but a lot of guys here have had salvage radiation treatment.

Basically, you have a lot of research to do, and need to speak to an assortment of experts.

I hope their assessments are all hopeful, and that they feel you can do with less treatment, verses more,

max

 

Rakendra's picture
Rakendra
Posts: 198
Joined: Apr 2013

We PCa survivors suffer more from treatment side effects than from the cancer itself.

   The wonderful thing about these boards is that one can get very different opinions and the chance to express them.  The above statement is a fine example.  There are difinitely two sides to this.  As for me, I have had NO problems from my very advanced cancer at all.  Treatment was an absolute disaster, not only from a physical standpoint, but also treatment created severe emotional issues as well.  It is not one size fits all.  Very different results can come from similar cases and similar treatments.  I guess the real answer is that no one knows for sure what is going to go down.  It is just wait, see, and pray.  love, SwamIi Rakendra

stoniphi's picture
stoniphi
Posts: 54
Joined: Mar 2015

...with 2 extracapsular extentions. (they pulled and checked a bunch of lymph nodes and a chunk of my colon as well - all were negative) 1 seminal duct was involved and he had to take 'some' of my nerves. 35 gram tumor...also found out I am allergic to the 'Steri-Strip' surgical adhesive, got a dozen quarter-sized blisters around the incisions. Those came off when he pulled the bandages. That was kind-of gross and painful. 2 weeks after my Dec 2012 RARP my PSA was 0.2ng/dl so the doc started me on ADT with Firmagon (as there is no Testosterone flare with that chem) 3 months later, still on Firmagon, they checked to see if I was continent. Since I was continent they started me on my 80 Gy of Cyberknife EBRT. 2 months, every weekday. They also switched my chem to Lupron, then to Eligard. At this time I have passed the dotted line at the end of ADT chemo and am 2 years out from my last radiation treatment. I anticipate a return to 'normal' sometime in the next year.

 

I am informed that my treatment is right on the current reccommendations for a healthy 64 year old such as myself. The treatment side effects have been annoying, but they are nothing compared to a slow, painful death from metasticized prostate cancer. I must admit that I live in a wealthy area so I have access to the very best treatments and doctors you can get. I am also a 'health nut' and an athelete so I started out with a major advantage. I only took 2 weeks off of my fitness program for the surgery, after that I was back at it so I remain in a statistically advantaged cohort. The doc tells me there is a 20 - 30 % chance of the adenocarcinoma returning, that means there is a 70 - 80 % chance it will not. I will find out as we go along now. Smile

Old Salt
Posts: 720
Joined: Aug 2014

Your post was uplifting. And as we go along with our messed up, or absent, prostates, new treatments may become available.

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I am hoping for new and better treatment options like immunotherapy like "CAR T", but was originally excited about Provenge until I realized it only extends one's life by 4.1 months. Provenge came out in 2010 so I am optimistic newer and better treatments a real close to being approved.

 

 

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Your post is very helpful and I will research your treatments/drugs for my possiblew future treatments.

 

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I will be starting RT as soon as my incontinants is 100% or plateu'd as it is 90% healed right now.

 

 

VascodaGama's picture
VascodaGama
Posts: 3013
Joined: Nov 2010

JMS58

I am sorry if my above “statement” was not proper or lead anyone toward a wrong conclusion as commented by Old salt. By experience survivors who live long years with the bandit live also with the side effects from treatments, which in the majority prejudice to a certain extent the normal quality of living. The cancer is symptomless but a death caused by prostate cancer seems to be painful.

Regarding the analysing of nerve bundle while in operation, questioned by you, this is not a common practice, however, in open PCa surgeries, dissecting firstly a few number of close lymph nodes to get them analysed at the facility’s laboratory, fast, it is done before dissecting anything else with the intent in verifying if surgery has been the proper choice. If these were "contaminated" with cancer then doctors would stop the operation and stitch up the patient. He would be recommended for radiation therapy, instead.

Using the nerve bundles with the same principle to decide on a surgery with or without nerve-spare technique seems to be a good idea but I wonder how they decide in a “contaminated percentage” without dissecting them all. I think the choice of 50% was guessing work. If the surgery managed to get rid of the cancer totally then the choice was good because it gives you higher and faster chances for complete erection. A future salvage treatment using radiation could undermine their good job.

I hope your next PSA indicates remission and that stays like that forever.

Best,

VG

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Thank you for your input and well wishes.

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I thought this was great news as I won't need radiation and or Hormone Dep...

IS this good news or bad news?
I will be seeing my new Doctor at Mass Gen next week to discuss, but thought some input from this experienced forum would be helpful'

 

 

 

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3295
Joined: May 2012

JMS,

Following surgical removal, PSA (after several week's waiting time) should go to "undetectable."

"Undetectable" is defined in most labs as <.04 ng/mL.

 

See the doctor next week, and get a full assessment from him at that time.

 

best of luck,

max

Old Salt
Posts: 720
Joined: Aug 2014

it seems to me that some form of radiation, perhaps combined with hormone therapy, is in your near future because your pathology report showed that some cancer had escaped the prostate. And your recent PSA report seems to agree with that observation.

 

If I am wrong, you can send me the bill. Wink

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I flagged your response thinking I could keep it in my favorites, but evidently flag in this forum context means means the administrator is going to look at your reponse.  My Bad!

 

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

I had a new PSA blood draw (1 week after the .1 reading)
This new draw was at Mass Gen Hosp. and will go to 2 decimal places. I don't have the results yet.

It has bee 8 weeks since RP with 50% nerve sparing on both bundles.
I will be meeting with a radio oncologist soon to discuss radiation and or Hormonr Dep Treatment.

From what I read this .1 is not a good sign and it has me really worried.

My Gleason was 6 prior to RP and after surgery my pathology graded as T3c in which I had two positive margins and positive PNI, but no seminal vessel cancer.
Since gleason was a 6 prior to RP no Lymph were tested.

It surprised me to go from a Gleason 6 to T3c.  Now a .1 after RP.
This must indicate I have very agressive PCa.

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 1013
Joined: Mar 2010

JMS58:

Unfortunately, I agree that you probably have an aggressive cancer.

In your original post, you said you were staged at T3a, which means that the pathologist believed that your cancer had already spread outside of the prostate capsule at that time.  There is no stage T3c.  So, not sure what stage you are now but it really doesn't matter -- the only question is, Where has the cancer spread?

You also said in the original post that your cancer was rated at Gleason 7 (3+4) after surgery.  Your were rated Gleason 6 from the biospy but that was superceded by the post-surgical pathology report.

It's probably not good that your post-surgerical PSA was 0.1 (it should be around 0.01 post surgery) and further treatment (radiation and/or hormone therapy) would probably be in order.  However, your PSA level does not address the question of whether the cancer has already spread to other areas of your body.  So, some additional testing to determine the spread (if any) would also be advisable.

Good luck!

 

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Thankyou Swingshiftworker,

do you know what other tests should be done?

I am thinking bone scan,what kind and where in the body?

enhanced MRI ?  Does/should this include full body scan or just pelvic area ?

Old Salt
Posts: 720
Joined: Aug 2014

To my limited (!) knowledge, the tests that you mentioned won't show anything because your PSA level is so low.

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 1013
Joined: Mar 2010

There are a variety of methods that could be used to scan for cancer in other areas of the body.  The most common methods are MRI, CT, PET and Nuclear Bone scans.  The problem is that most doctors (and insurance companies) do not want to use these expensive procedures unless there is a good reason to do so; ie., some evidence of cancer in a specific area.

In your situation, I would first ask for an MRI/MRSI scan using a Tesla magnet inserted into the rectum to scan the area where the prostate was located as well as the adjoining areas of the bladder and rectum.  These are the areas where cancer is most likely to be found if the cancer escaped from the prostate.  The MRSI is a method of spectrographic imaging that can detect the presense of cancer by measuring the level of choline found w/in the scanned area; choline is a marker for cancer. 

At a minimum this scan can be useful for determining where post-surgical radiation treatment should be directed and may also indicate the source of additional cancer sites in proximity to the prior location of the prostate.

Beyond that,  I doubt that your doctor (or insurance company) could be willing to authorize additional scans, unless you are feeling some pain or irregularity in other areas of the body, except perhaps a bone scan, where prostate cancer also tends to gravitate.  However, it doesn't hurt to ask for the moon and see what they are willing to do for you.

Good luck!

 

 

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Thank you for that information.
I will research these scanning technologies you mentioned.
I did not know the cancer choline connection.
I am homozygous for PEMT gene which is involved in choline metabolism.
I will definitely research this more though.

VascodaGama's picture
VascodaGama
Posts: 3013
Joined: Nov 2010

Unfortunately there is still no perfect GPS machine to locate cancerous prostatic cells (PCa). The image study suggested by Swing above may provide a clue on abnormalities in shape and size of a tissue but to judge it as being a PCa is difficult.

At the present, the best exam to locate those cells (with numerous cases of positive results) seems to be the C11 PET/CT scan. The contrast agent is Carbon 11 choline or Carbon 11 acetate that are “absorbed” by those cells, providing its location. There is also a newer exam in trials since 2013 that has shown potentially better results than the C11 PET/CT in detecting PCa which is known as the 68Ga-PSMA PET/MRI. However, from trials we know that these exams provide false negatives in cases of low PSA serum (<1.50 ng/ml). For you with such low level of PSA in the 0.1 these exams may be futile and may not provide aparent targets for radiation. The radiologist will probably follow his own experience in other treated patients or follow the recommendations from the NCCN guide lines which protocol include the radiation of the prostate bed with or without lymph nodes.

You may read details on those exams from the links in my thread at:
http://csn.cancer.org/node/290854#comment-1504743

The PSA is a marker of cancer progression post treatment. PCa produces it but aggressive type of cells typically produces little serum. These could be the ones classified as Gleason grade 4 in your score of 7. I read that typically a tumour of 1cm in size produces 2.0 ng/ml PSA. A MRI machine 3-tesla may detect deformities with sizes of 7mm. A CT requires at least one centimetre to provide a positive scan.

15 years ago (at the age of 50) I also experienced recurrence after a failed RP. I was in need of a salvage treatment but wanted to get the “targets” to throw the arrows. During the waiting period all tests come negative apart of an increasing PSA. Doctors diagnosed me with micrometastases which refer to cancer forming several tiny tumours in spread colonies. This condition is still harder to be detected by traditional image study machines. My Gleason rate was 3 (score 6) representing low aggressivity in progression which may be behind my 15 years in survivorship.
The PSA has been the marker to trigger treatments. In 2006 with a PSA of 3.8 ng/ml I did salvage radiation even with no targets founds (false negatives from annual MRI and Bone scans). In 2010 with a PSA of 1.0 ng/ml I started hormonal therapy. Cancer has never shown its “face”. It never bother me. But the side effects from treatments have impaired my quality living to certain extent.

Best of lucks in your continuous care.

VG

 

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3295
Joined: May 2012

Vasco,

So clear, such marvelous detail, as always.  Should be handed out to oncology interns !

I just get a sense from all of this that you have got the disease beat, or at least permanently at bay, and will be around here writing at 90 years of age.  All ahead flank !

max

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015







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 I can't thank you enough VascodaGama,
My wife and I met with the my Radiation Oncologist yesterday and he recommended exactly as you detailed it.
He was thorough and reviewed my pathology report and had already plugged in my numbers on the Sloan Kittering website which showed my 6 year cancer free as 75%.
He also said that since I had positive inked margins and extraprostatic extension and my PSA is 0.11 after RP he was very confident the cancer is only in the prostate bed, and any scans will probably not detect any tumors even the C11 acetate.
My Radiation Oncologist also does not recommend ADT at this time because of quality of life and possible masking of PSA after radiation and the ADT treatment.  He scheduled an appointment with the Oncologist to discuss ADT.
He recommends 35 treatments and said to come in with a full bladder, and as far as side effects he said I will start feeling tired the last two weeks and may incur incontinence and more frequent bowel movements, but that will be temporary.
He also said to get my incontinent issues resolved (which are 90% healed) or plateaued before we start the radiation within 30 days as it will never get better after treatment.
he asked about my sex life and what my progress with that is.  I told him I have quite a few Homozygous mutations in the NOS3 (eNOS) genes which control blood vessel relaxation and constriction, and my sex life had been non existent before and after RP so I did not expect any changes.  My wife and I still love each other and have excepted this.

I am not going to push for a C11 acetate scan at this time even though I have recent extreme neck degeneration and pain.
My Rad Onc stated it probably won't pick up tumors at 0.11 PSA, and he said if I had a tumor in my neck my PSA would be much higher.  
The neck pain started at the exact time of my contraction of Lyme disease so I believe the Lyme spirochetes ate away my collagen and damaged my neck area.
I went on 6 weeks of antibiotics and feel the spirochetes are long gone.  Talk about extreme head/neck/eye pain from Lymes.  I could not even go outside for three months without dark sunglasses with welding goggles and a jacket completely covering my head.
I also feel the Lymes weakened my immune system more and allowed my Gleason score 6 PCa to escalate into prostae escape.

 

VascodaGama's picture
VascodaGama
Posts: 3013
Joined: Nov 2010

JMS

I absolutely agree with your decision. You should get your incontinent issues resolved before starting RT, even if the fact causes you to postpone the schedule of the SRT. Your PSA is not alarming high to require a quick fit.

In the sex department, RT will not affect much your present condition. In any case, tinny nerve bundles may be distressed and to avoid any atrophy I would recommend you to be active using Viagra type of meds and massages several times a week. These are recommended in all PCa treatments.

Diet is also important and you should avoid antioxidants during RT and for a period after that. Antioxidants may revive cancer that has been knocked down by the radiation. You can find a good copy about nutrition in here;

http://cancer.ucsf.edu/_docs/crc/nutrition_prostate.pdf

Once you get your doctors protocol (number of Gy and field of radiation in regards to the lymph nodes), I suggest you to get a second opinion at a separate facility. Different doctors may diagnose you diferentely and recommend different protocols.

Best wishes,

VG

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Than Nutrition and Prostate Cancer PDF is a good comprehensive article.
Your statement about avoid anti-oxidants during RT and a little after is a heavy thought....my instinct was to load up on anti-oxidants to prevent damage from the radiation, but I guess I want the radiation to damage me (cancer and other surrounding tissues) or else why would i do it.
The article is all about nutrition and how it helps against prostate cancer, and how anti-oxidants fight PCa, but what diet should one take during radiation if you want it to kill your cancer?

 

 

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3295
Joined: May 2012

If I were you, JMS, I would also do the radiation, and do it now.  The oncologist is right: whatever spread you have is likely in the bed area, and not going to show up on even the best currently-available scans.  He is proceeding partially from guesswork, but very well-educated guesswork.  At times, that is the best we can get.  I also agree with his thoughts regarding not doing Hormonal therapy now.  Statistically, his approach seems quite sound to me as a layman.

Regarding antioxidants expert opinions vary. My hematologist during lymphoma treatments recommended drinking green tea, but some good studies do indeed recommend against.  Regardless, eat healthy, since it can only help. 

Like you, I had a variety of health problems before ever getting PCa (severe trauma, late-stage lymophoma), so I am pulling for you dude,

 

max

VascodaGama's picture
VascodaGama
Posts: 3013
Joined: Nov 2010

As commented by Max above you have or had other issues that should be considered in all your choices. Radiation causes bowel issues therefore foods with fibre are best. My typical breakfast since a case of haemorrhoids in 1980 is 100% bran with yogurt. That has put my bowel in continuous check cleaning it when needed. Fibre may counter the effects of the scars from radiation but it does not interfere in its action against cancer.

You can read my experiences with SRT in this link;
http://csn.cancer.org/node/293453#comment-1496929

Best,

VG

stoniphi's picture
stoniphi
Posts: 54
Joined: Mar 2015

...RT increases the oxidants in the irradiated cells. The mitochondria (small inner cellular organelles) deal with oxidants to protect and preserve the cell. The higher the Gleason score of the cancer cell, the fewer mitochondria it has to do that job. Yes, the mitochondria use antioxidants to nuetralize those oxidants, but the cancer cells have so few they simply cannot keep up with the damage and thus die. This especially so if they have been already stressed by lack of testosterone and/or removal of the primary tumor along with its blood supply. That is the theory, at least.

 

Yeah, diet is always an important factor...like exercise, lowering stress and getting plenty of sleep. However, trying to eliminate anti - oxidants from  your diet seems an effort in futility to me....a quick fix that may well give more of a feeling/illusion of control than an actuality of control.

 

Heh - I have had serious hemorrhoids since I was a Longshoreman 45 years ago. Super - healthy balanced diet since then, bleeding got pretty bad after ART for a while.....

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Thanks all, and thank you stophini for that theory on cancer cells not having the amount of mitichondria to deal with the amount of oxidants received by radiation treatment.

I will be consulting with my naturopathic doctor to go over what herbs/mushrooms to take before/during/after radiation treatment.

JMS58
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2015

Hi All,

I started my EBRT this week.
I will have 35 treatments at 70gray.
I plugged in my statistics for 6 year survival and it shows 75% chance on not have a recurence.

This radiation treatment/side effects seems easy compared to freinds and family who have had lung and neck cancers.

 

I will let you all now how I fell halfway through and if I start haviing side effects.

 

Thanks All,

 

john

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