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A little question about where your NHL was found, what part of your body?

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

My first diagnosis was found in the groin area, I found the lump myself. On the one and only recurrance I found a small lump under my left breast and it turned out to be the recurrance. Just wondered where others tended to spring up for the diagnosis with any of you? I mentioned in another post that 24 years later they have found a lymph node in my other breast that looks perfectly fine but I want a needle biopsy anyways just to be sure and they think that with my history it's a good idea. It's tomorrow. Just wondering if there is some pattern to sites where NHL is commonly found. I do know the groin is one area but that's all I know.

Thanks for reading my post.

Blessings,

Bluerose

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

My first diagnosis was from a lump on the top of my leg in the groin area and the second occurance was under my left breast. I have totally forgotten the type of non hodgkins lymphoma I had and keep meaning to look it up again, old chemo brain here forgets everything, lol, but I will find it later this week and post it. I think it was large and small cleaved follicular but not entirely sure, it was 25 years ago. I can barely remember what I had for breakfast today. lol. Hmmm, what did I have? Sheeesh. lol

Hugs,

Bluerose

BryanK519's picture
BryanK519
Posts: 20
Joined: Jul 2011

My son is the one with the NHL. It was found in his tonsils. We all thought it was tonselitis at first until we realized that the antibiotics were having absolutely no effect.

dewdrop52
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 2011

My husband was just recently diagnosed with NHL. On Mother's Day weekend he told me he was having some rectal bleeding. He had a colonoscopy scheduled right away. The doctor found a large tumor in his intestines. Since then he has had an abdominal surgery and 2 chemo sessions (R-CHOP)out of 8 scheduled. It is so good to read all your postings. I have had so many questions that only people who have gone through the experience can answer.

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

I am glad you discovered this site because you will find alot of answers here to your questions and help with some of your emotional issues too, and your husbands too in all likrlihood. It's a fabulous site that helps to validate cancer survivors and their caregivers and as time goes on you will see how important that can be, you are right, only people have gone through the experience really know where it's at.

As I may have mentioned I am a 25 year survivor of NHL and so my treatments were many years ago but even at that I have survived and I know that your husband can too. Be there for each other, he will need your support and make sure that in the process you take care of yourself too because many caregivers tend to burn out trying to do it all for the cancer patient and neglect to care for themselves.

All the best and remember it's a whole new day in cancer treatments, new treatments around the corner and many stories of long survivorships and in fact cures. Try to remain positive and when you feel down don't beat yourself up because we all have those times too.

Write anytime you feel you need to and someone will be here to respond I'm sure. There is a chatroom on this site too for instant chat so you might want to try that too. Sometimes you have to wait in the room a bit for someone to come in but hang in there they will most likely be along shortly and I'm sure they will be glad to chat with you.

Blessings to you and yours,

Bluerose

Keith1961
Posts: 10
Joined: Jun 2011

What type of NHL does your husband have? I have a small tumor in my small intestine near the terminal ileum. Mine is follicular small b cell. I am currently on watch and wait since I have no symptoms. Mine was found by accident during a colonoscopy. Did your husband have any other symptoms?? How is he doing now? - Keith

dewdrop52
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 2011

We have had a recent hospitalization and are getting back on track here at home. My husband has Large B Cell Lymphoma Stage IV. He is 83 and has always been a strong and vital man. I have remained hopeful knowing that he started out from a fairly strong place. He did have a problem with ITP for about 10 years. I haven't seen anyone post comments about this autoimmune problem. It stands for ideopathic thrombo cytopenia purpura. He took predisone for this condition for many years. I'm wondering if this left him susceptible to the lymphoma. From about the time he was diagnosed with the tumor he had been feeling very weak and tired. We thought it was the ITP and didn't pay too much attention to the symptoms because periodically this would happen to him. He would take a few weeks to start feeling normal again. We are thankful that the bleeding symptoms appeared because I immediately started making phone calls and doctors appointments. Since the colonoscopy in May he has had 3 hospital stays. The first one was for the removal of the tumor after which we had to wait for the abdominal wound to heal before chemo could start. Unfortunately, the lymphoma started hitting hard and he was going downhill quickly. He was admitted to City of Hope and had his first chemo treatment. That stay lasted 2 1/2 weeks. He was home for a couple of weeks and became dehydrated with fever and sore throat so we went back. All his numbers were off so he stayed for 4 days more while they gave him platelets, red blood cells, potassium, magnesium, antibiotics and probably more. He is home now and has had a lot of weakness and just a few good days where he felt normal enough to do some light chores around the house. His abdominal wound is still trying to heal and I'm thinking that a lot of his weakness is just from recuperating from the surgery. Poor guy. The doctor's say he has had a rough time. He's a trouper and doesn't complain, but my sweet good natured husband is often depressed..something I have seldom seen in our 32 years of marriage. I'm up with insomnia and decided to check the site. So, thank you for your warm welcome and I promise to check in more often.

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Thanks for your response. I am sorry to hear that your family is battling NHL but I am here to tell you that it can be beaten. As I have mentioned on this posting I am a 25 year survivor of NHL and although the fight is rough in treatment years long term survival and a cure in fact is not out of the question. When my doctors used the 'cure' word I was so shocked, I never thought it was possible but in fact it most certainly is.

I am gathering that your son is young and hopefully strong to fight this thing and with your support and support of other members of his family and friends you can all get through this.

Post anytime, this site is remarkable in the support you will get from it. We will learn from you too.

All the best.

Blessings,

Bluerose

BryanK519's picture
BryanK519
Posts: 20
Joined: Jul 2011

Thanks BR. Yes, my son is only 13, but he is strong and he has been demonstrating an impressive amount of perseverence and optimism. While I can't empathize with those of you who are enduring this battle - I can most certainly sympathize as I have watched my son suffer with this for the past two months. I rejoice for those of you who have successfully battled this disease and my prayers and hopes go out to all of those still engaged in the fight.

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Thanks for your response. I am sorry to hear that your family is battling NHL but I am here to tell you that it can be beaten. As I have mentioned on this posting I am a 25 year survivor of NHL and although the fight is rough in treatment years long term survival and a cure in fact is not out of the question. When my doctors used the 'cure' word I was so shocked, I never thought it was possible but in fact it most certainly is.

I am gathering that your son is young and hopefully strong to fight this thing and with your support and support of other members of his family and friends you can all get through this.

Post anytime, this site is remarkable in the support you will get from it. We will learn from you too.

All the best.

Blessings,

Bluerose

CountryGal7557
Posts: 165
Joined: Feb 2011

under my left jawline. two tumors right beside each other. grew so fast in one week, it pulled my skin down and my face looked lopsided.

have been in remission since July 2010. whoo hoo!!

Hugs :)
Janelle

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Ya my lump in the groin area came up super fast. The oncologist called it 'blow up lymphoma' because it comes up out of nowhere quickly. Sounds like that happened to you too, it's quite a shock isn't it?

Glad to hear you have been NED since 2010, let's keep it that way !!!!

Blessings,

Bluerose

violinist1
Posts: 33
Joined: Aug 2011

Dear bluerose,
I have often wondered whethwr there is a commom next placefor my kind of lymphoma, follicular nhl, and i too found it all of a sudden one day in my left groin, one enlarged node, overnigjt. I have googled the expression blow up lymphoma and coukdn't find it. My doctors haven't used it to me. I currently spkit my care between 2 oncologists, one at Yale, and one in Stamford where i live,. I like themboth very much. I am going to them both because i can, and it is a great relief to me that they agreed to split me, meaning that every single thing i do i check with the yale doctor first or i don't do it. I guess i view him as in charge of me but i like my stamford doctor, she is local, and i think it s important to have a local do yoi really like, even if you feel the need to double check everything the wY i do. I wonder, do you have any sense of likely places or is it pretty impossible to forecast it? I plan to stay free o it, but i can't help but have a lot of anxiety about where it might appear. There is no way to live like that though, so i have to try to put my mind on things that i enjoy, in order to save my sanity. My doctor says that thinking these thoughts are typical of ptsd butthat it will gettter.

Go_go_Gi_gi
Posts: 84
Joined: Aug 2011

Dear Violinist1-
In question and answer session with my Oncologist today--one of the things he said was the "reappearing site is likely to be in the same area as the original, though the "NHL-cells" might decide to "pack up and go elsewhere" -- sometimes after many years, or not at all--

Susan

violinist1
Posts: 33
Joined: Aug 2011

If it came back in the same place , and i already had radiation there, can't have it there again, what next? Different plan fot that. I'll plan on not having it back.

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

I think getting a second opinion and even having a second oncologist throughout is a great idea. This is a big decision, some of the treatments, and of course you want to make sure you are doing the best for yourself. You are very fortunate that 2 doctors at different hospitals agreed to share you. Interesting.

You have to have faith in your doctors, it gives you peace - well as much as you can have through the cancer journey I mean. I think you are doing the absolute best you can do for yourself.

As far as the next location for any recurrances that is impossible to know. I'm not even going to share where my first and last recurrance was because that may make you more sensitive to that area in your own body and first of all YOU MAY HAVE NO RECURRANCE anyway and even if you did it would possibly be somewhere else.

You have to remember one thing EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT as far as cancer is concerned. You can read through these boards and get a 'sense' of what others have gone through and what questions to maybe ask your doctor based on what you have read on the boards and elsewhere but remember - everyone is different. I totally believe that in 'some' cases your mind can play a great part in recovery or illness so, in my opinion, you need to do exactly what you said and that is to get your mind off of recurrance and on to more constructive things to do. Are you a violinist in fact? Music is such a healing thing I think so that in itself would be a great place to focus. I always turn on music to lift my spirits and sure wish I could play an instrument.

The term 'blow up lymphoma' I think was just coined by some doctors to just describe how some lymphomas just appear out of nowhere suddently, it isn't a kind of lymphoma - just their way of saying that it just poof is there all of a sudden - to the eye that is. Obviously it has been growing wherever for swhile before you see it sometimes.

You are not alone in worrying about a recurrance at all, most do to some extent or another, but dwelling on that really is pointless when you think about it. There are many many things to 'worry about' in life but who wants to go through life not seeing the more positive side to life because we do have the choice. It would be tragic to think of someone who is going through life after cancer doing nothing but worrying about it never coming back then living for many many years and never having it come back but they have ruined their lives inspite of the cure through worrying alone. Right? Right.
It is a worry, no doubt about it, but try and put it on a shelf and try to focus on what is good around you.

Keep writing, it's good for you too.

Hugs and blessings,

Bluerose

MacGrandma
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2011

I was mis-diagnosed for nearly a year. They thought I had Chostrochondritis and my chest inflammation was now in my head, stress due to having 4 children and being overseas in Germany with my husband in the Army. The chest busted through with an what looked like a hard marble under the skin that then they biopsied turned red and soft.. they thought it was a cyst and refused to biopsy.. it broke ribs was a grapefruit also in around my trachea and heart valves.. I barely made it out of Germany.. medivac'd to the States to Letterman Army Medical Center in San Francisco.. Now they have found it was through my whole chest, under both arms necrotic tissue and new on my neck... My chest was full pigeon breasted before starting Chemo from the cancer. I am a lucky now 26 year survivor!! :)

catwink22's picture
catwink22
Posts: 281
Joined: Sep 2009

I hope you know how important you survivors are to us! There is no greater hope than to hear of someone beating the odds and going forward with their lives in such a positive way. Thank you for that hope! This journey can become such a dark road and you are the SUN lighting the way. I know I sound corny, but there are times when I think "This just isn't ever going away" and I can come here and see that it can.
I found a lump under my left arm (I just realized I've been thinking it was my right for the longest time and I didn't even have chemo so I can't blame it on that!) when I was in the mirror putting my hair up. When I had my PET scan my largest node was in my groin, but I never felt it. Does sound like it might be a common place.
And Bluerose, thank you for answering each and every post under this topic that is so thoughtful.

JoanieP's picture
JoanieP
Posts: 573
Joined: Mar 2010

Bluerose is really an inspiration. I appreciate how she answered everyone too. I often wish we could all meet somewhere and talk. I feel like we understand each other as no one else really does. Hugs Joanie

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

I find it hard sometimes to answer some of the replies as I post under other headings on this site too but I try to get back to those I start talking to and who reply to my postings. I learn alot from each of you and that's the beauty of this site, we all learn from each other's experience and feel validated in experiences we all share that we have in common. It's a wonderful site and place to connect with those who have walked in our shoes.

All the best and for your kind words.

Blessings,

Bluerose

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

What a trauma you have been through. I am so happy to see another long term survivor on the site. It gives everyone else hope that cancer in fact can be beaten. Thanks for your reply.

All the best,

Bluerose

anag21's picture
anag21
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2011

My initial diagnosis was found in my pancreas after about a month of pain and getting very jaundiced. I have NK lymphoma which as I understand is a pretty rare condition. I am currently undergoing my second cycle of the SMILE treatment and after the first cycle I still was very upbeat and found it a lot easier to cope. Lately I have been having a much harder time as I am only 20 and have pretty much had to put my life on hold. I was wondering if you had any advice on what to do to feel better and lift my spirits some.

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

First of all you have done a good thing for yourself by coming to this site. There are alot of very caring and knowledgeable people on this site who have all been where you are at one time or another and as you will find out that is valuable. People who are around you, family members and friends will no doubt support and care for you but only those who have experienced what you are going through can connect with you on your emotions and issues dealing with the cancer itself so do visit here often and comment with any questions you might have, someone will respond.

In answer to your request for advice on what to do to feel better and lift your spirits I guess I can start by saying that I am a 25 year survivor of NHL. If I can make it that long with the treatments they had 25 years ago then you have a great chance of beating this thing too, with all of the new treatments and meds that they have today. I had very little support back then but now with the internet and sites like this a patient has alot of true support and you will find alot of information here that you can use. Just some advice though. Remember that every person is different even if they have the same cancer and the same treatments so read what people have experienced but know that their experiences won't necessarily be yours. When it comes to chemo and rads people can respond quite differently depending on all kinds of factors.

You are young and I will assume healthy and that will go a long way in helping you beat this thing. Cancer CAN BE BEATEN today, I am living proof and I am not alone. You will meet many on this site, long term survivors who have beaten it and you can too. No one is going to say it will be easy but you will get through.

I was twice your age when I was diagnosed and I have done it. Chemo isn't fun and it took a long time for me to recover but that's because I had a bone marrow transplant and they aren't like they were back then, now.

Trying to keep your spirits up by doing the things you loved to do before diagnosis, maybe in more moderation or a little differently than you are used to in the beginning perhaps (more gently if need be) is one of the best ways to get through. If you are into sports for instance but you aren't well enough to play then maybe see if you can help to coach if you are up to it or if you are stuck in bed maybe start a sports memorabilia collection that doesn't take as much energy. Step by step you will get back to doing the things you love. That was just an example, using sports, to illustrate what I meant. People will tell you to try to be positive and that's important but it's perfectly okay to cry when you want to or just feel lousy for a day or two or three. You have the right so don't feel weak if you can't function as you used to. Your body is or has taken a hard hit from treatments and it takes time for it to come back. You will be very tired, rest, listen to your body. Read if you can do nothing else or watch tv, video games - it's your time to care for yourself too and listen to your body.

I know right now all you see are doctors ahead of you and treatments and feeling rotten and I get that, I did too, but just one foot in front of the other, day by day, take it one step at a time and you will be fine. What goals had you set for yourself in the future? Don't forget them and try to do something to further your steps forward in reaching those goals if it's only reading about the area in life you are most interested in while your body mends.

I don't know if you are a spiritual person or not but I hope you are because I know that for me that's what got me through many difficult times during my treatments and recovery.

YOU CAN DO THIS. Now go right ahead and kick it's, um, ---, well kick it - you get the drift. lol.

All the best.

Blessings,

Bluerose

Go_go_Gi_gi
Posts: 84
Joined: Aug 2011

You are all important to me--your experiences, thoughts, struggles, etc. Thank you

This site is a great site--I agree with you Bluerose re: spirituality helping me through.
I believe in the power of prayer and positive thinking---praise for the good things we have, and the strong potential to regain our health---
Information and sharing from those of you who have had success is a boon and strength--also, sharing the difficulties provides freedom for us "newbies" to vent, cry, experience a wide range of conflicting emotions--without guilt---

I have hope!!!

Thank you all--susan

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Well said Susan. If one has hope then one has the best chance there is. Keep up the fight Susan. I sure wish I had a site like this 25 years ago when I was going through my diagnosis and treatments, makes all the difference to know that you aren't alone. Support on many fronts is soooooooooo different today, there was very little when I was diagnosed but now there are programs in hospitals for support and groups all over the place and that is just amazing. There have been so many advancements in cancer support and treatments that I have seen over the 25 years of my journey with cancer and it's afterdays, simply amazing. I am happy for all those who are needing support - you have it in spades today. What a blessing !!!!

All the best,

Bluerose

anag21's picture
anag21
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2011

Bluerose,
Thank you so much for your quick response and kind words. My spirits have been picking up as the weather has finally gotten better here and I can actually get outside without having a heat stroke! I was able to enjoy some older passions and maybe even found a couple new ones this weekend so I am doing much better! I am learning to take things one day at a time and not worry about the things I cant control. Slowly but surely I'm figuring out how to deal with this thing. Also I got some great news! My LDH levels (lymphoma markers as I sort of understood from the doctor) are very close to normal and my Epstein Barr virus levels have gone from 15000 to under 100. Sounds like the chemo is kicking the cancer's butt!

Thanks again,
Ana

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Good to hear that your treatments seem to be working big time, keep that up. Also sounds like you are making your way through your cancer journey super well, no one said it was easy but you seem to be doing all the right things and keeping your interests up is a huge thing. Good going.

Keep us posted and again so happy to hear that things are looking up.

Take good care,

Bluerose

anag21's picture
anag21
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2011

Unfortunately I had a minor setback in treatment today. While getting my l-asperiginase infusion I had a pretty bad allergic reaction, hives, itchiness, and trouble breathing. The docs were able to get everything under control but I'm supposed to receive this infusion every other day for two weeks and this was only my first one. Not sure what's going to happen now. Since my cancer is pretty rare and there isn't much literature on it, I really was hoping to stick to the regiment that worked in trials and stuff. I'm really scared of changing things up and the other treatment not working as well. Onc says he has a lot of thinking and decisions to make tomorrow while I continue to worry about what will happen on Thursday! Here's hoping I continue to get better!

Ana

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

I know how you are feeling with something else going wrong right in the middle of a treatment, I too had things happen that set the treatments back a couple of times but it worked out. Who knows, maybe an alternate idea will in fact work better, you never know. When I decided to do a bone marrow transplant they had just changed the protocol and were just starting to try stem cell transplants and here I am 25 years later. My point is that if I had had the transplant only a month earlier (which I was supposed to by the way but I had something go wrong with treatment and had to wait) I swear a month earlier, without the stem cell, I would not be typing to you. So a change isn't always a bad thing.

Have faith.

Do you know if the oncologist you have is talking with other oncologists at other centres about your protocol? I know you have to get on with it but if there is any way he could check with others who might have had the same experience you might feel more confidant that others have been there before. You are obviously allergic to some part of the drug or it's suspension if it has any so there could well be an alternative others have used in the past. Hard to believe that you are the only one who was allergic to this particular drug/substance.

Maybe even put up a question on the board here and the title could say something like 'Anyone found allergic to ___________' during treatment' and see if anyone on the site has had the same experience. It's a long shot but you never know. This site is worldwide, someone else out there might have been through the same thing and it might help to pass it by the Oncologist if you find someone. Just a thought.

Ana you are in my prayers.

Hugs,

Bluerose

anag21's picture
anag21
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2011

Another reaction today to the same chemo but half the dose =[

Anyway, unfortunately the protocol for my type of lymphoma has only been around for about 3 years and hasn't been used hardly at all in America. Therefore, there isn't much to talk about with other doctors as far as that goes. In fact, my oncologist is actually actively trying to get in touch with the Japanese author who came up with this regiment and proved its effectiveness in treating the disease to see what we should do and what our next step is as far as the reactions are concerned. I'm just really worried that I am going to turn into an experiment and that freaks me out. I want to stay on the protocol that is known to be effective!

Forgot to mention earlier that this drug is actually known for reactions, it's a relatively normal occurring. My biggest concern is changing the protocol from the only one that is known to work.

Ahhhhhh so much to think and worry about, but I will get through it. Like I said before I am showing improvement so I will just take that for what it is, keep my head held high, and try not to worry about the things I can't control.

Thank you so much for your help.
Ana

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Sorry to hear about another reaction to the protocol. Well the good news is that you are doing well so that is a huge thing and maybe this waiting will prove to be a good thing in the near future, who knows.

I guess the only thing that I can think of saying to you at this time, for your situation, is that when I was treated 25 years ago I had protocols that are much different from those today but they still worked for me and others so maybe they might have to go back to older protocols if you can't handle the most recent. Maybe that doesn't make any sense but it just seemed logical to me.

Anywho I'm sure they know what they are doing but maybe put the word out and see what others in your situation with the same cancers might have had in the way of treatments and discuss them with the doc.

All the best Ana.

Bluerose

daisies
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2011

Docs thought my boyfriend had kidney stones so they ordered a CT scan. Shocking news to say the least. He had R-CHOP treatments and its been "GONE" since july 2010. bless you all!!!!

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Yup Daisies this happens a fair amount with all kinds of cancers. Doctors are looking for something else and find a cancer by mistake. The reason for that is because many cancers show no obvious symptoms until sometimes it's too late so finding a cancer in this way, seemingly by accident, I always think is kind of a miracle - that a totally different issue brought the cancer to the docs attention before it was too late. Sounds like a miracle happened to your boyfriend - led docs to the cancer through a kidney stone issue.

Hope all goes well for your boyfriend.

Blessings,

Bluerose

tiger39m9
Posts: 1
Joined: Dec 2011

in Dec of 2010 had cramping in lower abdomin, it would start out like 4 days cramping and 3 days i would be fine. it did this all mounth long in dec of 2010.

now jan 3 of 2011 i whent into the hospital with the cramping and the pain was getting worse, they did a ct scan and found a large mass in my lower abdomin, they tried to
do the biopsy with the scope thingy not sure of what its called but you know what i mean and they said it was in to dangerous of and area to use the scope to do the biopys
so they did and open biopys on me with a 6in scar going down my belly and found a large lymnode in my neck.

now Jan 8 of 2011 i got my Diag. which is High Grade Diffused Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Stage 3B

i did 6cyc of r-chop with no radition finished that in jun 20, 2010 and the 2 pet scan since then shows a lot of scar tissue, but no active lymphoma , goto my 3 pet scan on jan 3 2012.

but the troulbe i have now is with the scar tissue left since it was so much of it left
mine was 3in wide by 6ih long and now i have a lot of adhesition to the scar tissue witch keep me in pain all the time

po18guy
Posts: 1069
Joined: Nov 2011

I simply put my left hand against the side of my head, like you might do when contemplating or sitting at a desk. Oh oh. By the time I was properly diagnosed, there were 53 others. Ugh. Did I mention that we must become our own advocates? That second opinions save lives? Oh, yeah!

COBRA666's picture
COBRA666
Posts: 2413
Joined: May 2010

I bet everyone that reads your post just checked behind their ears for any lumps. I know I did. It is strange sometimes where these lumps pop up. I never had any lumps that I could feel. Mine were all in my abdominal area,except for a very small one in my groin and shoulder area. John

allmost60's picture
allmost60
Posts: 3184
Joined: Jul 2010

I could feel the lumps on my groin and neck, but couldn't feel the tumors in my stomach. I guess thats why I get a little anxious at times wondering if the tumors in my stomach are still "stable" since I didn't ever feel them in the first place. My CVP-R chemo knocked all of the tumors down, and the Rituxan maint is suppose to keep them down, but I still worry a bit since I don't get scans as often as others. I hated feeling and seeing the tumors on my groin and neck and was soooo relieved when they disappeared. Sue (FNHL-2-3A-6/10)

COBRA666's picture
COBRA666
Posts: 2413
Joined: May 2010

Sue,
I could not feel the lumps in my abdominal area either. At least I did not notice them. The scan showed mine were rather large. He said to lay on my back in bed and press from the rib cage down to about the naval area. Your body is relaxed like that and anything that is not normal will show up to the touch. After my first treatment I went home and tryed it. Nothing felt any different than before. The next night I noticed that my abdominal area felt softer...almost smoother to the touch and my fingers seemed to go farther into the abdominal cavity. Within 3 days my stomach felt extremely soft. I never noticed it before. It was like they melted away in a few days. Thats why I say I never felt them to begin with. I never noticed there were any lumps there until after I had the 1st treatment.I think most people can press pretty far down into their abdominal cavity when all is clear and if there is anything there you would notice it knowing what to feel for. In my case in the beginning I did not know what I was feeling so it felt normal. John

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