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What's your take on this anyone tried this juice??

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

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Folia Med (Plovdiv). 2006;48(2):11-7.
Current knowledge of Aronia melanocarpa as a medicinal plant.
Valcheva-Kuzmanova SV, Belcheva A.
SourceDepartment of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology and Biochemistry, Medical University, Varna, Bulgaria.

Abstract
Aronia melanocarpa, native to eastern North America, has become popular in Eastern Europe and Russia. Aronia melanocarpa fruits are one of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances, mainly anthocyanins--glycosides of cyanidin. Anthocyanins are water soluble pigments accounting for the dark blue and even black color of the fruits. Administered orally they can be absorbed as intact glycosides. Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice and anthocyanins derived from the fruits have been studied intensively for the last 15 years. Most of the effects of Aronia melanocarpa anthocyanins are due to their high antioxidative activity. Our investigations have demonstrated a remarkable hepatoprotective, a very good gastroprotective and a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice in rats as well as a bacteriostatic activity in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and an antiviral activity against type A influenza virus. Research of other authors has demonstrated that Aronia melanocarpa anthocyanins can normalize the carbohydrate metabolism in diabetic patients and in streptozotocin-diabetic rats, have an in vitro antimutagenic activity and exhibit a distinct immunomodulatory activity in human lymphocyte cultures and in patients with breast cancer, suppress the growth of human HT-29 colon cancer cells, inhibit the N-nitrosamine formation in rats and decrease the toxicity and cumulation of cadmium in liver and kidneys. Currently, there are no data in literature about any unwanted and toxic effects of Aronia melanocarpa fruits, juice and extracts.

PMID: 17408071 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Publication Types, MeSH Terms, SubstancesPublication Types
Review
MeSH Terms
Animals
Anthocyanins/chemistry
Anthocyanins/pharmacology*
Antioxidants/chemistry
Antioxidants/pharmacology*
Humans
Photinia*/chemistry
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Extracts/pharmacology*
Plants, Medicinal*
Rats
Substances
Anthocyanins
Antioxidants
Plant Extracts
LinkOut - more resourcesMedical
Antioxidants - MedlinePlus Health Information

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3908
Joined: Nov 2010

I'd have some for breakfast if they were locally grown.
they look like blueberries.

interesting article thanks for sharing it.

I have not heard of this and did some reading .....
hugs,
pete

Also known as Black Chokeberry, it is prized for its health benefits.
This ravishing plant produces a show of elaborate white spring flowers, with masses of delectable and nutritious black fruit arriving in fall. A delicious addition to a border, Aronia is a tough and durable plant that thrives in a wide range of soils. Fruits are loaded with Vitamin C and phenolic substances, mainly anthocyanins.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

So if you are talking chokeberries, being Alaskan I can tell you that NO PETE you would not want to eat them for breakfast like blueberries, quite poisonous I learned from my parents and nana's, that the seed are a no no. You have to take and make them into a jam, which is quite good tasting, they weren't "wild" in Alaska, but everyone had the bushes, my mother would not make chokecherry jam and we weren't allowed to eat them, due to the poisonous seeds, leaves and branches, so be careful when thinking about eating chokecherries, you have to be very careful in the process of making it jam. And if my native people aren't willing (our shaman's among them) to eat chokecherries, neither am I.
Winter Marie

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Cautions:
"注意: Do not overdose. Large amount can induce vomiting
and diarrhea. Do not to use during pregnancy or in cases of qixu
(qi deficiency) or yinxu (yin deficiency), or hemoptysis"

You should try to keep in mind, that some herbs are full medicinal
strength, and can do as much damage as good in the wrong hands.

I always recommend having a qualified TCM physician, or at
least a qualified herbalist on hand if your going to try the herbal
route. It's worked well for me, but without my TCM doc, I could
have been in serious trouble at one point! Too much of any herb, can
be as disastrous as too much of any western medicine pharmaceutical.

There's an old adage for lawyers that goes like this:
"An attorney representing himself at trial, has a fool for a lawyer."

That goes for those "self medicating" as well; especially when cancer
is involved!

Unless you're willing to take the time to study and learn about the
route you are about to take, don't go there..

TCM works, just as other types of herbal compounds do, when they're
built by experienced and qualified herbalists, but unless you're willing
to take the time to study and learn what each can or can not do, please...
do not try them.

I really care to see everyone staying alive in spite of cancer. But no-one
should go into their route blindly, regardless if it's TCM, western meds,
or anything else. Take the time to learn as much as you can about the
route you're about to take.

Make your decisions based on your own information and intuition.

It's your life at stake!

Best wishes for a long, long life!

John

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

Thanks John, apparently these berries are native to the Great Lakes Region, so I would suppose they'd be in season in the fall at the local fuit markets around my neck of the woods, probably much like when it's blue berry season and you can purchase fresh picked blue berries at road side stands when in season!! Just I've never paid attention to these berries in the past and when this article specifically mentioned colon cancer it peaked my interest. Leena

SisterSledge's picture
SisterSledge
Posts: 342
Joined: Feb 2011

Hi John,

I don't think you are refering to the same plant Leena is writing about. Aronia melanocarpa is a native american plant (Chokeberry) with much historical use. Currently it is being promoted quite heavily in European countries for its health benefits. Your link is for Atonic Melanacantha. The links that are listed on the results page of freefind.com definitely show a different plant.

Here are some Google results for both plants:

http://www.google.com/search?q=Aronia+melanocarpa&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a#q=Aronia+melanocarpa&hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=ivns&ei=tTPdTai7MObbiAKn84wU&start=0&sa=N&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=6af0f014ae16db6c
Aronia melanocarpa

http://www.google.com/search?q=atonic+melanacan&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
atonic melanacantha

Here is some of the best info on chokeberries health benefits:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Research
Read the comments section for more info
PubMed search: aronia

Though these berries seem to be very healthful, they don't sound tasty...dunno if I'd be willing to juice them...Imma picky eater >;-p

Janine

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Ya'see, that's what sis's are for!

The link I provided isn't for the "Chokeberries" you guys are
referring to....(I think I gots herbal brain)

There have been no side effects or hazards reported with
Aronia melanocarpa, as far as I know. But to be safe,
remember that moderation is always best!

Sorry 'bout that!

Best of health, and don't eat too many berries.

(nice catch, sis.... and thank you!)

Mea culpa.

John

SisterSledge's picture
SisterSledge
Posts: 342
Joined: Feb 2011

Happy to help :)

BettyJoM's picture
BettyJoM
Posts: 86
Joined: May 2011

I looked to see if you commented on this berry Janine.
Where in the world would you find it anyway

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

Looks like a Pete posting, can't understand it at all. In laymen's terms what the heck are you talking about?
signing off as "not a rocket scientist,
Winter Marie

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Sit with me; hold my hand…..

Pete’s from one of those foreign places that do not
speak in our tongue; we provide an excuse and comfort
to those that that do not know our dialect.

Really! Wha-foe! Mudder-momma..!!

Be still my dear, better days are on the horizon.

John

ellamenno's picture
ellamenno
Posts: 145
Joined: Aug 2010

Ha,ha,ha,ha good one! Bless Pete's soul:) Hey Pete, isn't great being known here by just your first name? Kinda like a rock star:)

Winter, chokecherry or chokeberry?

Peace, Laurie

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