Another secret cure for cancer?

kristasplace
kristasplace Member Posts: 955
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
Okay, i've been reading everything i can on hidden secrets of curing cancer, and i've discovered something VERY interesting. Many people are claiming that apricot kernels, all by themselves, cure cancer! It would seem too simple to believe, but then i asked myself why is it illegal to sell apricot kernels?

At any rate, i'm taking about 5-10 kernels per day. Though they aren't "legally" supposed to be marketed, the company i mention a lot sells them, and they can be bought other places online. Hell, you can make them yourselves by harvesting the kernel from the seed of any ole' apricot, and dehydrating it at low temperatures so it's palletable. They taste like pungent almonds.

That's my two cents for the day!

Hugs,
Krista
«13

Comments

  • PGLGreg
    PGLGreg Member Posts: 731
    laetrile
    "why is it illegal to sell apricot kernels?"

    They're sort of poisonous. Cyanide. Laetrile, as I recall, was the name of the old pseudo-medication derived from apricot pits whose purpose was to relieve credulous cancer patients of their funds.

    Here: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/laetrile/patient/27.cdr#Section_27 is a report on laetrile side effects:

    The side effects of laetrile treatment are like the symptoms of cyanide poisoning. These symptoms include:

    * Nausea and vomiting.
    * Headache.
    * Dizziness.
    * Blue color of the skin due to a lack of oxygen in the blood.
    * Liver damage.
    * Abnormally low blood pressure.
    * Droopy upper eyelid.
    * Trouble walking due to damaged nerves.
    * Fever.
    * Mental confusion.
    * Coma.
    * Death.

    --Greg
  • coloCan
    coloCan Member Posts: 1,944 Member
    Dr Mercola has article about Vit D and Coloncancer
    For what its worth, the 10/13 issue of Dr Mercola on internet(mercola.com) has item about Vitamin D and doubling colon cancer survival rates......Steve
  • kristasplace
    kristasplace Member Posts: 955
    PGLGreg said:

    laetrile
    "why is it illegal to sell apricot kernels?"

    They're sort of poisonous. Cyanide. Laetrile, as I recall, was the name of the old pseudo-medication derived from apricot pits whose purpose was to relieve credulous cancer patients of their funds.

    Here: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/laetrile/patient/27.cdr#Section_27 is a report on laetrile side effects:

    The side effects of laetrile treatment are like the symptoms of cyanide poisoning. These symptoms include:

    * Nausea and vomiting.
    * Headache.
    * Dizziness.
    * Blue color of the skin due to a lack of oxygen in the blood.
    * Liver damage.
    * Abnormally low blood pressure.
    * Droopy upper eyelid.
    * Trouble walking due to damaged nerves.
    * Fever.
    * Mental confusion.
    * Coma.
    * Death.

    --Greg

    Laetril
    Apparently it's laetrile that is used in cancer treatment therapies. The only negative information i've found about the substance is from websites that have a questionable interest in debunking it. I pasted a copy of the letter G. Edward Griffin wrote in response to a newspaper article debunking laetrile. At the bottom of the letter is a link to the website i thought was very interesting. Hope you enjoy it!



    Letters to the Editor and Press Releases



    Dated: January 11, 2001

    Letter to the Editor
    Los Angeles Times

    I am the Founder of The Cancer Cure Foundation, a non-profit organization that, for 26 years, has been dedicated to the task of compiling information on alternative cancer treatments from around the world.

    I am in strong disagreement with the views expressed by Barrie Cassileth in the article entitled "Laetrile by Any Other Name Is Still Bogus" which appeared in your publication on January 1, 2001. Our findings are that Laetrile is among the best treatments for cancer that has ever been found. It does not work 100% of the time (what therapy does?), but our studies show that Laetrile is significantly more effective than radiation or chemotherapy.

    Conventional medicine is losing the fight against cancer. After decades of research and the expenditure of billions of dollars, the cancer rate still continues to climb. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, second only to heart disease. Thirty-three percent of all women will develop cancer in their lifetime — fifty percent of all men! Virtually every family now is at risk. Conventional medicine is further from a cure for cancer than when the search began.

    Your readers should be cautioned that Barrie Cassileth is employed by the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan, which has a reputation for scientific fraud. In 1974, it was the scene of one of the greatest scientific scandals of the century. Dr. William Summerlin, one of the top-ranking researchers there, claimed to have found a way to prevent transplanted tissue from being rejected. To prove his case, he displayed white mice with square black patches of fur, claiming that skin grafts from black mice were now accepted by white mice. It was later discovered that he had created the black patches with a marker pen.

    On a much more serious level was the well-publicized Laetrile test conducted at Sloan-Kettering in the 1970s. The final report stated there was no evidence that Laetrile was effective. However, employees inside Sloan-Kettering secretly sent copies of the actual lab reports to the press that proved just the opposite. Dr. Ralph Moss, who was Assistant Director of Public Affairs at Sloan-Kettering, was one of the whistle-blowers. He was fired because of it. The Sloan report was an insult to truth and a prostitution of science. A well-documented account of this episode is the chapter entitled "Genocide in Manhattan," in World without Cancer, by G. Edward Griffin. It will change your view regarding the integrity at Sloan-Kettering.

    The Cancer Cure Foundation offers free information on over 100 alternative cancer therapies. Laetrile is just one of them. Your readers are invited to visit our website, www.cancure.org, or to call me personally at (800) 282-2873.

    Sincerely,

    G. Edward Griffin
  • Kathleen808
    Kathleen808 Member Posts: 2,342
    Hi Krista
    Hi Krista,

    I don't know anything about apricot pits but someone mentioned them to me yesterday for helping with cancer.

    Since you are looking at alternatives, have you heard of the Budwig diet. Basis is flax seed oil and cottage cheese. This is from the 1940's I believe.

    Aloha,
    Kathleen
  • snommintj
    snommintj Member Posts: 601

    Hi Krista
    Hi Krista,

    I don't know anything about apricot pits but someone mentioned them to me yesterday for helping with cancer.

    Since you are looking at alternatives, have you heard of the Budwig diet. Basis is flax seed oil and cottage cheese. This is from the 1940's I believe.

    Aloha,
    Kathleen

    Be careful
    You can overdose. You should be fine with 5-10 but do not exceed more than 20. I've eaten some when I can get them. I don't know if they work but some folks swear by them. If you eat too many you will get sick and you can die.
  • PhillieG
    PhillieG Member Posts: 4,866
    Laetrile - from Wikipedia
    Cancer treatment
    "Amygdalin was first isolated in 1830. In 1845 it was used for cancer in Russia, and again in the 1920s in the United States, but it was considered too poisonous. In the 1950s a reportedly nontoxic, synthetic form was patented for use as a meat preservative, and later marketed as Laetrile for cancer treatment.

    Initial studies at Sloan-Kettering
    In 1972, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center board member Benno Schmidt convinced the hospital to test laetrile so that he could assure others of its ineffectiveness "with some conviction." However, the scientist in charge of the testing, Kanematsu Sugiura, found that laetrile inhibited the secondary tumors in mice, though it did not destroy the primary tumors. He repeated the experiment several times with the same results. However, three other researchers were unable to confirm Sugiura's results. While these uncontrolled results were considered too preliminary to publish, they were leaked to laetrile advocates, resulting in significant public attention.

    To expand on Sugiura's results, Sloan-Kettering researchers conducted a controlled experiment in which they injected some mice with laetrile (as Sugiura had done) and others with placebo. Sugiura, who was unaware of which mice had received laetrile, performed the pathologic analysis. In this controlled, blinded follow-up of Sugiura's initial uncontrolled experiment, laetrile showed no more activity than placebo.

    Subsequently, laetrile was tested on 14 tumor systems without evidence of effectiveness. Given this collection of results, Sloan-Kettering concluded that "laetrile showed no beneficial effects." Mistakes in the Sloan-Kettering press release were highlighted by a group of laetrile proponents led by Ralph Moss, former public affairs official of Sloan-Kettering hospital, who was fired when he announced his membership in the group. These mistakes were considered scientifically inconsequential, but Nicholas Wade in Science noted that "even the appearance of a departure from strict objectivity is unfortunate." The results from these studies were published all together.

    Subsequent clinical studies and advocacy
    In 1974, the American Cancer Society officially labeled laetrile as quackery, but advocates for laetrile dispute this label, asserting that financial motivations have tainted the published research. Some North American cancer patients have traveled to Mexico for treatment with the substance, allegedly under the auspices of Dr. Ernesto Contreras. One of these patients was actor Steve McQueen, who died in Mexico following surgery to remove a stomach tumor while undergoing treatment for mesothelioma. Laetrile advocates within the United States include Dean Burk Ph.D., a former chief chemist of the National Cancer Institute's cytochemistry laboratory and national arm wrestling champion Jason Vale, who claimed that his kidney and pancreatic cancers were cured by eating apricot seeds. Vale was convicted in 2003 for, among other things, marketing laetrile. The US Food and Drug Administration continues to seek jail sentences for vendors selling laetrile for cancer treatment, calling it a "highly toxic product that has not shown any effect on treating cancer."

    A 2006 systematic review by the Cochrane Collaboration concluded: "The claim that Laetrile has beneficial effects for cancer patients is not supported by data from controlled clinical trials. This systematic review has clearly identified the need for randomized or controlled clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of Laetrile or amygdalin for cancer treatment." Given the lack of evidence, laetrile has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The U.S. National Institutes of Health evaluated the evidence separately and concluded that clinical trials of amgydalin showed little or no effect against cancer. For example, a 1982 trial of 178 patients found that tumor size had increased in all patients. Minimal side effects were seen except in two patients who consumed bitter almonds and suffered from cyanide poisoning."


    So, it seems you need to be careful if you experiment with this.
    Next there will be the resurgence of Shark Cartilage for curing cancer.
    Although, death is a cure for cancer.
  • dianetavegia
    dianetavegia Member Posts: 1,942
    PhillieG said:

    Laetrile - from Wikipedia
    Cancer treatment
    "Amygdalin was first isolated in 1830. In 1845 it was used for cancer in Russia, and again in the 1920s in the United States, but it was considered too poisonous. In the 1950s a reportedly nontoxic, synthetic form was patented for use as a meat preservative, and later marketed as Laetrile for cancer treatment.

    Initial studies at Sloan-Kettering
    In 1972, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center board member Benno Schmidt convinced the hospital to test laetrile so that he could assure others of its ineffectiveness "with some conviction." However, the scientist in charge of the testing, Kanematsu Sugiura, found that laetrile inhibited the secondary tumors in mice, though it did not destroy the primary tumors. He repeated the experiment several times with the same results. However, three other researchers were unable to confirm Sugiura's results. While these uncontrolled results were considered too preliminary to publish, they were leaked to laetrile advocates, resulting in significant public attention.

    To expand on Sugiura's results, Sloan-Kettering researchers conducted a controlled experiment in which they injected some mice with laetrile (as Sugiura had done) and others with placebo. Sugiura, who was unaware of which mice had received laetrile, performed the pathologic analysis. In this controlled, blinded follow-up of Sugiura's initial uncontrolled experiment, laetrile showed no more activity than placebo.

    Subsequently, laetrile was tested on 14 tumor systems without evidence of effectiveness. Given this collection of results, Sloan-Kettering concluded that "laetrile showed no beneficial effects." Mistakes in the Sloan-Kettering press release were highlighted by a group of laetrile proponents led by Ralph Moss, former public affairs official of Sloan-Kettering hospital, who was fired when he announced his membership in the group. These mistakes were considered scientifically inconsequential, but Nicholas Wade in Science noted that "even the appearance of a departure from strict objectivity is unfortunate." The results from these studies were published all together.

    Subsequent clinical studies and advocacy
    In 1974, the American Cancer Society officially labeled laetrile as quackery, but advocates for laetrile dispute this label, asserting that financial motivations have tainted the published research. Some North American cancer patients have traveled to Mexico for treatment with the substance, allegedly under the auspices of Dr. Ernesto Contreras. One of these patients was actor Steve McQueen, who died in Mexico following surgery to remove a stomach tumor while undergoing treatment for mesothelioma. Laetrile advocates within the United States include Dean Burk Ph.D., a former chief chemist of the National Cancer Institute's cytochemistry laboratory and national arm wrestling champion Jason Vale, who claimed that his kidney and pancreatic cancers were cured by eating apricot seeds. Vale was convicted in 2003 for, among other things, marketing laetrile. The US Food and Drug Administration continues to seek jail sentences for vendors selling laetrile for cancer treatment, calling it a "highly toxic product that has not shown any effect on treating cancer."

    A 2006 systematic review by the Cochrane Collaboration concluded: "The claim that Laetrile has beneficial effects for cancer patients is not supported by data from controlled clinical trials. This systematic review has clearly identified the need for randomized or controlled clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of Laetrile or amygdalin for cancer treatment." Given the lack of evidence, laetrile has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The U.S. National Institutes of Health evaluated the evidence separately and concluded that clinical trials of amgydalin showed little or no effect against cancer. For example, a 1982 trial of 178 patients found that tumor size had increased in all patients. Minimal side effects were seen except in two patients who consumed bitter almonds and suffered from cyanide poisoning."


    So, it seems you need to be careful if you experiment with this.
    Next there will be the resurgence of Shark Cartilage for curing cancer.
    Although, death is a cure for cancer.

    That Mercola link
    Here's an active link to the Vit. D3 article.

    In this latest study, people with colon cancer who had the highest average levels of vitamin D had half the mortality rate of those with the lowest average levels, indicating that optimizing your vitamin D levels can improve your survival rate even if you already have the disease.

    Click here to read
  • laurie83833
    laurie83833 Member Posts: 63
    PhillieG said:

    Laetrile - from Wikipedia
    Cancer treatment
    "Amygdalin was first isolated in 1830. In 1845 it was used for cancer in Russia, and again in the 1920s in the United States, but it was considered too poisonous. In the 1950s a reportedly nontoxic, synthetic form was patented for use as a meat preservative, and later marketed as Laetrile for cancer treatment.

    Initial studies at Sloan-Kettering
    In 1972, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center board member Benno Schmidt convinced the hospital to test laetrile so that he could assure others of its ineffectiveness "with some conviction." However, the scientist in charge of the testing, Kanematsu Sugiura, found that laetrile inhibited the secondary tumors in mice, though it did not destroy the primary tumors. He repeated the experiment several times with the same results. However, three other researchers were unable to confirm Sugiura's results. While these uncontrolled results were considered too preliminary to publish, they were leaked to laetrile advocates, resulting in significant public attention.

    To expand on Sugiura's results, Sloan-Kettering researchers conducted a controlled experiment in which they injected some mice with laetrile (as Sugiura had done) and others with placebo. Sugiura, who was unaware of which mice had received laetrile, performed the pathologic analysis. In this controlled, blinded follow-up of Sugiura's initial uncontrolled experiment, laetrile showed no more activity than placebo.

    Subsequently, laetrile was tested on 14 tumor systems without evidence of effectiveness. Given this collection of results, Sloan-Kettering concluded that "laetrile showed no beneficial effects." Mistakes in the Sloan-Kettering press release were highlighted by a group of laetrile proponents led by Ralph Moss, former public affairs official of Sloan-Kettering hospital, who was fired when he announced his membership in the group. These mistakes were considered scientifically inconsequential, but Nicholas Wade in Science noted that "even the appearance of a departure from strict objectivity is unfortunate." The results from these studies were published all together.

    Subsequent clinical studies and advocacy
    In 1974, the American Cancer Society officially labeled laetrile as quackery, but advocates for laetrile dispute this label, asserting that financial motivations have tainted the published research. Some North American cancer patients have traveled to Mexico for treatment with the substance, allegedly under the auspices of Dr. Ernesto Contreras. One of these patients was actor Steve McQueen, who died in Mexico following surgery to remove a stomach tumor while undergoing treatment for mesothelioma. Laetrile advocates within the United States include Dean Burk Ph.D., a former chief chemist of the National Cancer Institute's cytochemistry laboratory and national arm wrestling champion Jason Vale, who claimed that his kidney and pancreatic cancers were cured by eating apricot seeds. Vale was convicted in 2003 for, among other things, marketing laetrile. The US Food and Drug Administration continues to seek jail sentences for vendors selling laetrile for cancer treatment, calling it a "highly toxic product that has not shown any effect on treating cancer."

    A 2006 systematic review by the Cochrane Collaboration concluded: "The claim that Laetrile has beneficial effects for cancer patients is not supported by data from controlled clinical trials. This systematic review has clearly identified the need for randomized or controlled clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of Laetrile or amygdalin for cancer treatment." Given the lack of evidence, laetrile has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The U.S. National Institutes of Health evaluated the evidence separately and concluded that clinical trials of amgydalin showed little or no effect against cancer. For example, a 1982 trial of 178 patients found that tumor size had increased in all patients. Minimal side effects were seen except in two patients who consumed bitter almonds and suffered from cyanide poisoning."


    So, it seems you need to be careful if you experiment with this.
    Next there will be the resurgence of Shark Cartilage for curing cancer.
    Although, death is a cure for cancer.

    In your reasearch on Apricot
    In your reasearch on Apricot seeds (laetrile) and from an Dr. that worked for Sloan-Kettering and during the testing of the effects of Laetrile and cancer:

    Please - do a google search for = LETTER TO A MEMORIAL SLOAN-KETTERING DOCTOR.

    Also on Google search for "World without cancer" There is a full length video of this on Google videos (approx 55 mintues long)

    Please people use your own judgment As you will find the Publicized agencies such as Cancer institutes, FDA and other pharmacutically controlled companies are all against Laetrile while private sectors and some people who has used are totally for it.

    Use your own judgement.

    The post above - at the end of the copy and paste states this -

    Minimal side effects were seen except in two patients who consumed bitter almonds and suffered from cyanide poisoning.

    The test do not say how much they were giving the patients, was it only a few or was hundreds in a day etc? so again please use your own judgment - what I did was to actually contact people that I knew personally and from on the internet and from chat rooms, forums that stated they were in the process of doing their own natural treatments and how it has personally has worked or has not worked for them. Bottom line is what works for some may not work for others.. but is it worth a try??
  • laurie83833
    laurie83833 Member Posts: 63
    snommintj said:

    Be careful
    You can overdose. You should be fine with 5-10 but do not exceed more than 20. I've eaten some when I can get them. I don't know if they work but some folks swear by them. If you eat too many you will get sick and you can die.

    Death by Apricot seeds?
    I did a search on various terms:

    Death by Apricots, Death by Apricot seeds, Murder by Apricots, Murder by Apricot seeds, Suicide by Apricot seeds, Overdose of Apricot seeds etc. All in phrases and also boliene searchs by separate words. There has not been anything even remotely on the internet about any one instance of someone dying due to an overdoes of Apricot seeds. Maybe I just didn't search correctly but even if there was a case of someone dying from an overdose of Apricot seeds it certainly is not common some may feel some side effects if they eat to many or their system does not handle the seeds well. It is said if someone has a cup or more of Apricot seeds they may feel ill or worse with side effects (so Don't test that theory out). There would literally have to be over 200 seeds at one time taken to equal 1 cp of Apricot seeds. I do not know of anyone that has even attempted to take this many nor would I suggest anyone to try to see what if it has ill effects. With that being said I know some people who have reported taken up to 40 seeds a day (not at one time) but through out the day and according to them they did not have any side effects. I myself would not digest 40 Apricot seeds in a day I think from what my research has been both by reading on the internet and speaking directly with those taking Apricot seeds daily. The average per day runs from 5 - 25 per day. I think I read somewhere that a safe amount was 1 per 10 pounds of body weight daily. My husband was just diagnosed with Colon Cancer and had surgery to remove. He has been starting to take Apricot seeds, Aloe Vera Juice, some other vitamins and also will be on more healthier diet, while these things MAY OR MAY NOT HELP in his cancer recovery - we figure it certainly cannot hurt and is better then just waiting around for the next test results to come in and doing absolutly nothing on our own. As of now The DR's have not recommended any Chemo as his stage is Stage 1-2 (in that area), they will be reviewing shortly to see if they (the Onocological board) feels adjuctant treatment would be benificial in my husbands case

    Glad I found this board, but as far as Apricot seeds I suggest each do their own research and due dilligence in deciding if this is something they would like to do. Of couse Apricot seeds are not approved by the FDA (nor is most natural herbs or foods so this isn't a surprise) so is you use Apricot seeds for anything would be by your own accord and responsibilty. Be responsible, open minded and do your own research. As for us we are going to give it a try - myself included I am eating about 7 a day myself and my husband if I can get him to do about 15 (as he hates the taste) but how ever many he chooses to eat if any a day will be totally up to him.
  • kristasplace
    kristasplace Member Posts: 955
    I agree...
    I can't agree more with Laurie. While doing research, i always check to see who wrote or published the information, and then i dig and see who they're in bed with. Sometimes it's very difficult to find out who is publishing what, but i can tell you that wikipedia in particular is not drawn up by any unbiased sources, and anyone can go in there and write what they want. I no longer trust or believe anything anyone says who is in bed with the AMA, or any and all pharmaceutical companies. They're the ones with a vested interest in traditional cancer treatments, and there is no money to make in apricot kernels. The FDA hasn't approved any food alternatives for a cure because no one is going to invest a billion dollars in proper research if they can't get a return on their money. My doctor told me that my cancer treatments have cost an upwards of a million dollars! Each one of us is an undisputed money pit, especially if they can string us along in treatment for years and years and years.

    Listen to what other cancer patients have experienced with certain alternative treatments. That's always a seller for me. Seeing people who were "terminal" coming out better than pre-cancer many years after their doctors gave up on them. Read the studies being published by other countries who do not have big corporate businesses controlling the research. These are very hard to find, but i believe there is a study from Norway that proved apricot kernels cured cancer. I will try to find it, though i didn't hear about it online.

    I will continue to post about alternative cures i come across, and i hope that many of you do the same with your own research. We all deserve to know the truth, whatever it may be.

    Hugs,
    Krista
  • PhillieG
    PhillieG Member Posts: 4,866

    In your reasearch on Apricot
    In your reasearch on Apricot seeds (laetrile) and from an Dr. that worked for Sloan-Kettering and during the testing of the effects of Laetrile and cancer:

    Please - do a google search for = LETTER TO A MEMORIAL SLOAN-KETTERING DOCTOR.

    Also on Google search for "World without cancer" There is a full length video of this on Google videos (approx 55 mintues long)

    Please people use your own judgment As you will find the Publicized agencies such as Cancer institutes, FDA and other pharmacutically controlled companies are all against Laetrile while private sectors and some people who has used are totally for it.

    Use your own judgement.

    The post above - at the end of the copy and paste states this -

    Minimal side effects were seen except in two patients who consumed bitter almonds and suffered from cyanide poisoning.

    The test do not say how much they were giving the patients, was it only a few or was hundreds in a day etc? so again please use your own judgment - what I did was to actually contact people that I knew personally and from on the internet and from chat rooms, forums that stated they were in the process of doing their own natural treatments and how it has personally has worked or has not worked for them. Bottom line is what works for some may not work for others.. but is it worth a try??

    Go for it
    and let us know.
    ;-)
    If there are so many "miracle cures" why does everyone still have cancer? And please don't say it's because we're not eating enough apricot seeds/pits.
    You've got to use your own judgment in EVERYTHING and ANYTHING you try, that's just common sense.
    -phil
  • 2bhealed
    2bhealed Member Posts: 2,064
    PGLGreg said:

    laetrile
    "why is it illegal to sell apricot kernels?"

    They're sort of poisonous. Cyanide. Laetrile, as I recall, was the name of the old pseudo-medication derived from apricot pits whose purpose was to relieve credulous cancer patients of their funds.

    Here: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/laetrile/patient/27.cdr#Section_27 is a report on laetrile side effects:

    The side effects of laetrile treatment are like the symptoms of cyanide poisoning. These symptoms include:

    * Nausea and vomiting.
    * Headache.
    * Dizziness.
    * Blue color of the skin due to a lack of oxygen in the blood.
    * Liver damage.
    * Abnormally low blood pressure.
    * Droopy upper eyelid.
    * Trouble walking due to damaged nerves.
    * Fever.
    * Mental confusion.
    * Coma.
    * Death.

    --Greg

    Side effects?
    Geez Greg, your side effects for cyanide poisoning sounds like some chemo side effects people talk about....and I have witnessed.

    Funny isn't it?
  • 2bhealed
    2bhealed Member Posts: 2,064
    PhillieG said:

    Go for it
    and let us know.
    ;-)
    If there are so many "miracle cures" why does everyone still have cancer? And please don't say it's because we're not eating enough apricot seeds/pits.
    You've got to use your own judgment in EVERYTHING and ANYTHING you try, that's just common sense.
    -phil

    Hey Phil!
    What do you mean? I don't still have cancer!!

    I'll go with the miracle cures any day.

    :-)

    peace, emily
  • 2bhealed
    2bhealed Member Posts: 2,064

    I agree...
    I can't agree more with Laurie. While doing research, i always check to see who wrote or published the information, and then i dig and see who they're in bed with. Sometimes it's very difficult to find out who is publishing what, but i can tell you that wikipedia in particular is not drawn up by any unbiased sources, and anyone can go in there and write what they want. I no longer trust or believe anything anyone says who is in bed with the AMA, or any and all pharmaceutical companies. They're the ones with a vested interest in traditional cancer treatments, and there is no money to make in apricot kernels. The FDA hasn't approved any food alternatives for a cure because no one is going to invest a billion dollars in proper research if they can't get a return on their money. My doctor told me that my cancer treatments have cost an upwards of a million dollars! Each one of us is an undisputed money pit, especially if they can string us along in treatment for years and years and years.

    Listen to what other cancer patients have experienced with certain alternative treatments. That's always a seller for me. Seeing people who were "terminal" coming out better than pre-cancer many years after their doctors gave up on them. Read the studies being published by other countries who do not have big corporate businesses controlling the research. These are very hard to find, but i believe there is a study from Norway that proved apricot kernels cured cancer. I will try to find it, though i didn't hear about it online.

    I will continue to post about alternative cures i come across, and i hope that many of you do the same with your own research. We all deserve to know the truth, whatever it may be.

    Hugs,
    Krista

    AMEN SISTER!
    :-)

    peace, emily
  • PGLGreg
    PGLGreg Member Posts: 731
    2bhealed said:

    Side effects?
    Geez Greg, your side effects for cyanide poisoning sounds like some chemo side effects people talk about....and I have witnessed.

    Funny isn't it?

    Emily, no one would question
    Emily, no one would question that the standard chemotherapy agents are poisons, and so the fact that laetrile is poisonous of course shouldn't be taken to mean that it is ineffective in the treatment of cancer. I didn't intend my quoting the NCI's list of laetrile side effects to imply that. But I'm sure we could agree that just because the effective chemotherapy drugs are poisons, that doesn't mean that all poisons are effective for chemotherapy.

    --Greg
  • mommyof2kds
    mommyof2kds Member Posts: 519
    2bhealed said:

    AMEN SISTER!
    :-)

    peace, emily

    Amazing info...

    Amazing info...
  • PhillieG
    PhillieG Member Posts: 4,866
    2bhealed said:

    Hey Phil!
    What do you mean? I don't still have cancer!!

    I'll go with the miracle cures any day.

    :-)

    peace, emily

    That's Simple
    Because you like to be a troublemaker ;-)

    There is a HUGE difference between knowing what one is doing as far as juicing and dietary changes, and seeing something online and thinking that it can cure your cancer. A little information can be a dangerous thing. And to get back to an other part of this thread, the laetrile side effects do sound similar to chemo because both are poisonous. I mean chemo is controlled poisoning. I'm just more comfortable going with a poison that's been used numerous times and is effective.

    I certainly am not stopping anyone from playing doctor or researcher. As is said, they should go for it and let us know how it goes.

    Oh, and I owe you one Emily!
    ;-)
    -phil
  • 2bhealed
    2bhealed Member Posts: 2,064
    PhillieG said:

    That's Simple
    Because you like to be a troublemaker ;-)

    There is a HUGE difference between knowing what one is doing as far as juicing and dietary changes, and seeing something online and thinking that it can cure your cancer. A little information can be a dangerous thing. And to get back to an other part of this thread, the laetrile side effects do sound similar to chemo because both are poisonous. I mean chemo is controlled poisoning. I'm just more comfortable going with a poison that's been used numerous times and is effective.

    I certainly am not stopping anyone from playing doctor or researcher. As is said, they should go for it and let us know how it goes.

    Oh, and I owe you one Emily!
    ;-)
    -phil

    Me with a capital T-- HA!
    So are you saying you'd rather take the poison offered by Igor than, say, Timothy Leary? ;-)
  • kristasplace
    kristasplace Member Posts: 955

    Hi Krista
    Hi Krista,

    I don't know anything about apricot pits but someone mentioned them to me yesterday for helping with cancer.

    Since you are looking at alternatives, have you heard of the Budwig diet. Basis is flax seed oil and cottage cheese. This is from the 1940's I believe.

    Aloha,
    Kathleen

    Budwig diet
    Hi Kathleen! I have not heard of the Budwig diet, but i know flax is miraculous in it's own right.

    I will look it up and see what others say about it. I'm curious how the cottage cheese would work? Maybe as a fermentation agent?

    Thanks for mentioning it!

    Hugs,
    Krista
  • PhillieG
    PhillieG Member Posts: 4,866
    2bhealed said:

    Me with a capital T-- HA!
    So are you saying you'd rather take the poison offered by Igor than, say, Timothy Leary? ;-)

    And a capital ROUBLE
    Who is Igor and who is Timmy? I'm Leary of both choices. Tim was a doctor, I have a hunch Igor wasn't.

    If I got to a point where things were not going well I'd rethink my decisions. I can understand why there's controversy over this, who wants cancer? There are success and disaster stories on both sides of the issue. It reminds me of political elections in a way, you pick the lesser of two evils and hope for the best.

    There are always going to be people who look to modern medicine (chemo), others who look to diet, and some who look to prayer for cures. No one will agree on the "one and only way" to deal with this and most every other topic in the world. Go with you're comfortable with.