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Post Cancer Fatigue

jlfmiller
Posts: 4
Joined: Apr 2005

After being in remission for almost two years from rectal cancer (and feeling pretty good), I began to feel very tired all the time. This has gone on for months and much of the time, I feel like I did when I was on chemo. I know my blood pressure tends to become very low at the end of the day and I was blaming my fatigue on that. However, neither my oncologist or primary care doctor seemed concerned as I was not anemic and my thyroid medicine was working okay. I had never heard of post cancer fatigue until a few days ago when I received my Survivors issue of CURE magazine and read the article about Dr Wendy Harpham. I know this post cancer fatigue seems to be more common in those who have been treated for leukemia or lymphoma and also breast cancer. What I would like to know is, are there others out there, like me, who are experiencing this fatigue, long after treatment has ended?

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1385
Joined: Mar 2010

You and I have exchanged posting on another side and yes I did start to research these clinics. Great idea and yes here in St Louis the only ones are for young/early diagnosed case. Will try and call the Perini Clinic and go from there.

As you've mentioned, when you had the treatments some 20 yrs ago it was so different. Now people like yourself are the after affect patients and see more docs agreeing yes there's side affects from treatments. Now the start of where do we go from here???

I'll check further and post what I find.

BTW, had my 4-month oncol appt and all is still NED..yippee! So....the good eating, exercising, less stress, and imagery techniques must be helping. And..lots of praying!! Now if I could find that "less" stressed job that I can do from home...

Thanks again,
Jan

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

Glad to hear that you had great results. You are home free I just know it. Keep up that praying and imagery, I believe in both big time.

Yup let me know what you find out about after effect clinics for adults. Perini is the only one I know but probably are others.

Take care.

Blessings,
Bluerose

Homeus12
Posts: 2
Joined: Apr 2010

I have had dieticians alter my food intake thru the years as the chemo/radiation has done damage internally. With cervical cancer I had a radical hysterectomy in which ALL my female parts were removed.

This included cutting thru my urethra tubes (what my pee passed thru), radiation, which focused on my lower GI to get rid of any cancerous lymph nodes outside the uterus, causing internal sunburn.

Result: making absolutely certain I knew where EVERY bathroom was as anything I eat/ate would go thru me like water or give me severe diarhea. Dehydration is a factor in FATIGUE.

Treatments also affected my mental health due to loss of natural horomones, my vision, hearing loss, taste buds, to name a few causing depression which factors in fatigue. Life as I knew it changed forever.

I am also a recovering addict/alcoholic (18 yrs) & by the grace of god & support programs I am learning to turn negatives into positives. It's a daily process & I still struggle but life is good:)

Hang in there!!

globleinfosol
Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 2010

really you take a great step. today its going to be the biggest disease in the world. hope i will also be able to contribute somewhere.

pamysue's picture
pamysue
Posts: 105
Joined: May 2008

I have been in remission for 2 years now. I did not see the article you refer to, but my oncologist blames this on the cancer/chemo. He tells me when I have to sleep, which can be a LOT, to sleep. But to make an effort to get up and get things going to see if I can. I do not drive due to neuropathy and mental problems, but I live in the country and there is usually things to do. I miss the summer.

Good luck to you.

pamysue's picture
pamysue
Posts: 105
Joined: May 2008

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Ten_shi
Posts: 1
Joined: Jul 2011

Diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009, I had a mastectomy and chemo and for most of the year and a half since completing chemo I have had joint and muscle pain and fatigue. The biggest help has been hydration. I didn't know until I went to physical therapy for a shoulder injury that it's pretty common for cancer patients to get chronic dehydration and that is a big factor in joint and muscle pain. Chronic dehydration is different from simple or immediate dehydration - your body will gradually starve muscle and joint tissue of needed fluid so that your CNS and circulatory systems have the fluid they need. It doesn't show as much when in treatment because people tend to be less mobile and there are fewer demands on the muscles and joints. It took months to get to the point of chronic dehydration so it's taking months for me to get back to a normal level of fluid in all my joints and muscles, but I can feel an improvement already, and it's only been 2 months. I've never been much on drinking water so I just treat it like medicine and take my 6 doses a day! Between taking a multivitamin and a multi-mineral tablet a day, lots of fruits and veggies and the water, I'm starting (barely) to feel normal.

questing4health
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2011

I went through radiation treatments for Hodgkin’s some years ago. Two years later, I started suffering bouts of severe lightheadedness and fatigue. Here’s an article suggesting that radiation treatments can damage sensors involved in the regulation of blood pressure: http://jp.physoc.org/content/553/1/3.full.pdf. I seek others who share my condition so that we might benefit from one another’s experience and collaborate in pursuit of effective treatment. Please email John at questing4health@gmail.com.

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 6643
Joined: Apr 2009

I too suffer from BP problems radiation to the neck damaged my thermostats as I call them, my doctor said that my Carotid Sinus is the problem. When I stand up it is too low, when I lay down it is too high. What a case to be in, but life is still so sweet.

Not sure what your cancer was but visit us on head & neck

Thanks
Hondo

cathyp's picture
cathyp
Posts: 373
Joined: Dec 2009

I was treated w/rads and ABVD for Hodgkins Lymphoma also. My PCP says there is no clinical reason why I should feel any more fatigue than any other 50 yr old NOT treated for cancer. All my other doctors and I obviously disagree. After that comment from my PCP I feel it may be time to find a new one. Wonder how hard it would be to find a PCP willing to take on a Long Term 3 time cancer survivor w/many LT effects from treatment.

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 6643
Joined: Apr 2009

I am head & Neck NPC Cancer 3 times; it seams more and more that a lot of us are here and still alive doing well.

Wishing you well and hope you find the doctor you need
Hondo

bluerose's picture
bluerose
Posts: 1112
Joined: Jul 2009

My marriage broke up about 14 years ago I guess it is now and I remember now what hurt then but not as much as it hurts now that I know what is going on more clearly.

When I asked my husband at that time to leave he had devulged that there was someone else which hit me hard as I had no idea and he had never given me one signal he was not happy so that was a shock in itself. Anywho that night the conversation was short but nasty as you can imagin. One thing he said now plays over in my mind because in part of the chronic fatigue I have battled for years after the treatments were over. I am a 25 year survivor.

At one point in the conversation, speaking of this other woman, he said 'well at least she has a life'. OMG. We had two young lovely children then and even though I was still recovering long after my treatments were done I thought we had a life. Guess he didn't. Today though that phrase of his hurts the most I think because I realized then but only have been validated by docs not too long ago that yes in fact chronic fatigue is a big side effect of treatments - maybe for years and years to come.

My ex thought of me I guess as lazy and never wanting to do things with him and the family but I just couldn't, always far too fatigued and had other side effects that kept me down and still do. Yes he didn't know of the whole side effect issue either one could say, but why would I lie? Guess he didn't truly believe me either with all of my physical issues, always thought he did. Sigh.

I am always so joyous to see survivors talk about how supportive their spouses are, it's so important. Believe in survivors, they know their bodies best. Be there for them. That's better than medicine.

Blessings to all.

Bluerose

soblest6
Posts: 12
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi, I am a 3 yr survivor of Stage 3C Breast Cancer, in mid-forties, with teens and little kids. I was diagnosed in June 2008, surgeries, chemo, radiation, hysterectomy, more surgeries, with last one being Dec. 2009. Now on Femara. Within my 18-month "treatment" period, I was put to sleep six times for various procedures, then 3 more times because I had some digestive tract bleeding and a other issues that had to be investigated. We have a motto at my house, "Chemo sucks, thank God for chemo." I dont really know if its the chemo or all the surgeries, but, boy, I still feel like I have had my butt kicked hard! And as I read on another forum, I had the marriage that didnt survive. He and I both lost our dads about the time I was diagnosed, and he decided to drink his way into his 50's. He wanted me to go out and act like a college kid again (and to be his designated driver), hang out at bars and such, but I was just SO TIRED, plus had 4 teens to try to keep under control. So he found someone else to party with. Now I am getting a divorce after 25 yrs of marriage, and I have to manage my 6 kids (five still live at home plus a new grandbaby, yay!) and our finances, etc, by myself. I am so tired of feeling like a nutty hypochondriac! My children call me Dorie, after the forgetful fish on Finding Nemo. My sisters call me Aunt Clara. I try to stay active and exercise, but my BP is whacky now, and when I exercise I get so short of breath because my bp is high. I dont want to be this person! I used to be smart and active, have a high education and I worked in the medical field, but I have worked very little since getting cancer. I am too disorganized and way too fatigued to work full-time, so I do short fill-in work only. I actually FORGOT to go to work one day, and another time I didnt remember going to work, called my boss crying, and totally flipped when I realized I had FORGOTTEN an entire day at work. My onco, I swear, she's almost as dingie as I am, I question the fatigue but my bloodwork is amazing, and she blames everything on Femara.
Sorry, I said too much, I am having a week of insomnia and I am trying hard not to take a Lunesta, feel like the only person alive at 230 am, and it was a blessing to log into this forum and see posts from folks with similar issues. Now when I take my 2-hr nap tomorrow when the kids are at school, I will not feel like a failure!
This forum should be required reading for all spouses and caregivers of cancer patients and survivors! Thanks....

galtgirl
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2011

I am so relieved to discover I am not the only person who has long term chronic fatigue and pain after chemotherapy. I thought I must be crazy.
I completed 6 courses of CHOP for NHL in 2009 and then had a thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine treatment for Thyroid Cancer. Over the past two years, I have had constant fatigue and muscle/joint pain. It waxes and wanes, but is especially severe right now. I am an RN but had to stop working when I started Chemo and was never able to go back. Fotunately, I had long term disability insurance and was approved for Social Security Disability. I am turning 65 next week, but some days I feel older than my Mother who is 92.
I babysit my two grandsons ( ages 3 and 16 mos) one day a week, and I am so exhausted after that I usually spend the entire next day in bed sleeping. I ache all over and feel like I'm in a fog of fatigue.
I am glad to know I am not alone. I wish I had known this was so common. I tell my oncologist every visit how tired I am and how much joint pain I have, and he just shakes his head. I know it's because there isn't a thing he can do about it, but it would be nice to have been told this is not unusual. It's not something I was informed of could happen as a result of chemotherapy. I think once you are in remisission, the oncologist considers his job complete. Too bad long term effects are not treated as aggressively as the disease treatment that caused them.

Oneshot's picture
Oneshot
Posts: 153
Joined: Jul 2009

For a little more than three years after having a Whipple for stage 3 pancreatic cancer. I have thought I was some sort of lazy,forgetful, hypochondriac! The pain(s) all over my entire body that, I can only describe to people as ( Not only being hit by a train but, also being dragged down the tracks a mile or two after being hit! ). Some days, it over shadows the pain from the surgery's after effects that some of us that battle P.C.(and I'm sure other cancers) are told to possibly expect! Then the forgetfulness A.K.A. "Chemo-Brain" and the fatigue that just comes out of nowhere at times! Needless say some folks think I'm making these symptoms up! I do have days where everything feels fine and I remember to get certain things done. So, what do I do... I tend to over do and pay dearly for it later! That's my doing though! All the things like thyroid, exercise, telling doctors. Etc.,etc. That all of you have mentioned. Been there too! Here I was thinking for 3 years. What happened to me? I was hard working, I like to think I was pretty sharp minded,athletic and full of energy. To getting P.C. and thinking "O.K. if LORD willing I make it through this...It might take a while but, I'll get pretty close to being on track and back to something close to normal." All of you posting here know all to well what the rest of the story to this point is. You also have lived it I'm sorry to say.

So I THANK ALL OF YOU! For your posts. I know I must sound like a rambling idiot to the rest of you! But, to give you an idea how your posts have affected me. I'll put it in this perspective. At this moment. Finding out I'm not the lazy,forgetful, hypochondriac I thought I had become. I feel the complete opposite emotionally as the day I was told I had cancer! THANK YOU ALL AGAIN! I don't know why the doctors don't mention the long term effects! I think Galtgirl made a good statement on that point though.

I'll mention something that helps me tolerate the joint pain some and some of you might already have used this but,if you haven't. Check with your doctors first! I take Celebrex 200mg. It seems to take the edge off. I've heard both good and bad about it but, it seems to work OK for me.

You can bet I'll check back to this area to read or leave possible ideas to correct the issues we face.

Wishing all a MERRY CHRISTMAS and GOD BLESS!
Oneshot

Moralesa
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2011

I just ended radiation about a month and a half ago but I have always been a very active person so it is weird for me to feel fatigued from things as little as walking up stairs or talking and walking at the same time, or even just walking. I start lacrosse practice next week so I hope I will have enough energy to be okay through that. It helps to here this happens with others as well.

jmsuarez's picture
jmsuarez
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 2011

I was diagnosed with a enlarge B-cell Lymphona in August 2004...It was a Non-Hodgkins lymphoma..I entered remission in 2007 and to this day, 4+ years after ending the Chemo and radiation treatments and the medications, I still find myself suffering of sudden fatigue episodes. I could be well for months and then it hits...and it stops me on my tracks...I am down for days and I feel so depressed and helpless...I try to explain others what I am going through and I can't find the right words or feelings to describe it. I know I am not the only one..I know there are many of you out there that go through the same and can't seem to make others understand what you are experiencing. Let's talk!

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 6643
Joined: Apr 2009

Same here I get very weak at times and can’t explain it, all I can do is to lay down in bed. I been to all kinds of doctors for it and every test they run showed no problems. I did start taking an Iron vitamin and it does seam to help some, hope it works for you.

Hondo

JPfaff
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2008

I am in remission for over 3 years now, and I have fatigue all the time and severe fatigue sometimes. I had a very aggressive form of lymphoma, and had a stem cell transplant. My doctor told me it is very unusual to still have severe fatigue after 3 years, but I have been doing research and have found that is not true. There is a lot of research that indicates that many survivors, many years later still suffer with fatigue. It upsets me that my doctor is not aware of this, but I guess his job is to keep me alive...and he has done a great job of that.

JPfaff
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2008

I am in remission for over 3 years now, and I have fatigue all the time and severe fatigue sometimes. I had a very aggressive form of lymphoma, and had a stem cell transplant. My doctor told me it is very unusual to still have severe fatigue after 3 years, but I have been doing research and have found that is not true. There is a lot of research that indicates that many survivors, many years later still suffer with fatigue. It upsets me that my doctor is not aware of this, but I guess his job is to keep me alive...and he has done a great job of that.

hebrews1014
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 2011

Indeed the fatigue may last for a long time. Wish i could tell you different, but our bodies were poisened to help free us from this cancer. Bless you.

DrJack
Posts: 11
Joined: Jun 2010

same I sleep 12-14 hrs a day n am still tired n need naps sucks!!!! but better than cancer n chemo!!!

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 6643
Joined: Apr 2009

So correct it is better then C but just wish I could sometimes get back to a normal of some type. Anyway I am loving life again

Wishing you the very best
Hondo

Nina W
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi, my treatment for Ewings Sarcoma finished a year ago, and now I have Post Cancer Fatigue. Im exhausted, I cant get back to work, I really don't know what to do. My doctor saids it time, and they cant treat it, I just have to rest. Its almost worse than the cancer because I don't know what to do, I have my life but I can't do any thing with it.
Any ideas ???

Nina

JPfaff
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2008

I am in remission for over 3 years now, and I have fatigue all the time and severe fatigue sometimes. I had a very aggressive form of lymphoma, and had a stem cell transplant. My doctor told me it is very unusual to still have severe fatigue after 3 years, but I have been doing research and have found that is not true. There is a lot of research that indicates that many survivors, many years later still suffer with fatigue. It upsets me that my doctor is not aware of this. I love my doctor and I'm very grateful to him, but it's is confusing to me that he is not aware of this. Could you please tell me what issue of "Cure Mag" you found this article? Thank you for any help.

JPJC
Posts: 6
Joined: Feb 2010

Hi,

I am a Stage IV Colon Cancer survivor for 5 years now and continue to have issues with fatigue. I also have neuropathy issues that are very common according to my nurse at the cancer treatment center.

It is nice to know that I am not alone on this issue of fatigue. Sometimes I have energy and sometimes I get so tired that I feel like I am getting sucked into the couch and that there is a large weight pressing down on me, keeping me there. I carry a cot with me in my vehicle, so that if I am someplace where I can take a nap, I just pull it out and I do. It sounds kinda' goofy, but I don't care what anybody else thinks about it.

My oncologist is tired of hearing my complaints about fatigue and I understand that. He needs to focus on caring for those he can help and really can't afford to spend time on people like me, who are in remission.

None of the medications that I have had prescribed for me have helped with the low energy level or the pain and neuropathy in my legs. In addition, most of the meds make me crazy or give me suicidal fantasies, so I have stopped taking them. My marriage sucks and my spouse doesn't want to have any physical contact with me - I understand that because I look a bit grotesque.

Sometimes I question my faith and then feel like a hypocrite for doing so. It's pretty crazy - I should be thankful that I am still here and all that stuff, but sometimes I wish the cancer would just come back so I can get this crap over with.

Sorry if this sounds depressing, but that's my situation. It does feel good to get it off my chest and I suspect that I am not alone.

If anybody has any suggestions - please let me know. I'd rather get tips from somebody who has been there.

rq
Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 2015

My mom had severe neuropathy from treatment. We have found that accupuncture and lazer chiropractic do wonders.

Bebe-blue
Posts: 2
Joined: Dec 2012

Oh yes, big time fatigue. I had stage 2 colon cancer in 1994, treated with 5 FU and Levamisole. Was able to work as RN for about 10 years after treatment,(no night shifts), eventually had to shorten my shifts, then go on long term disability. I also have  severe autoimmune skin disease, dermatitis that feels like being attacked by fire ants on a sunburn.  The treatment for most autoimmune disease is steroids or other immunosuppressants. I don't want my immune system too suppressed, because I also have Lynch Syndrome, a genetic predisposition to mainly digestive system cancers, but also reproductive, urologic, brain and skin. 

valeriemom's picture
valeriemom
Posts: 2
Joined: Jan 2011

I thought after two years I would be ready to go.  It isn't so.  I am so tired all the time.  After chemo, radiation and surgery, I am taking Anastrozole for 2.5 more years.  It is wearing me out. After reading. it makes me feel at least like I'm not crazy.

kih
Posts: 4
Joined: Jun 2017

me too, after 01 year of treatment, i am feel tired; i thought the fatige was gone, but it didn't

valeriemom's picture
valeriemom
Posts: 2
Joined: Jan 2011

I was reading these comments, and it made me feel better in that I wasn't crazy.  After chemo, radiation and masectomy surgery, I am still taking Anastrozole for two and one- half more years.  I am tired all the time.  Just beat down tired.  I am diabetic, and I wonder if that has helped.   

mbenjam
Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 2013

I came across an article linking daylight exposure to the fatigue of cancer.  Seems like patients who got more light exposure suffered less fatigue.  While they didn't test out lightboxes or other treatment interventions, this is the first paper I've seen looking at the relationship.  

More information on my blog: www.doctormichaelbenjamin.com

HTH,

Dr. Mike

gregwitz
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2014

I finished 3 months of hard chemo for stage 2/3 testicular cancer, which got into my lungs and lymph nodes. My last treatment was on August 5th of this year and I am still having trouble with naseau, and fatigue, anyone have any Idea's on this or that are experiencing the same thing. the Naseau is really getting to me.

 

cif
Posts: 10
Joined: Jul 2015

I'm told okay not habit forming or risks, but I have open refill for PROMETHAZINE 25mg suppository for nausea.  Not sure if nausea from constant pain or from the imbalance got from chemo.  I am NOT medically trained.  take when u can sleep until you know how affects you, also avail orally but I barf it that way.  I try not to take more than once a week even though I'm told I could take more often, I use it to give self a break from pain/nausea.

mrsthomo's picture
mrsthomo
Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 2014

My name is Amy and I am 23 years old. I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011, at the age of 20 and completed all treatment before the year was up. 

Most people here can tell you what stage they were at and all but I didn't care at the time of diagnosis. Quite frankly, all I cared about was the fact that I was going to lose my precious hair.

Anyway. I have 1 ovary and my memory is utterly atrocious. The only way I even know which ovary is still there is because my husband said "You are Right handed and Left ovaried!" I have no idea what I would do without him. I would probably waste away because a LOT of the time I cannot even muster enough energy to even feed myself.

It's been a dream of mine to have 6 children for quite a while now and I am rather terrified that I won't be able to care for them in the way I want to. 

It's been so long since chemo that I feel my 'I had chemo' pass is well and truly up but my body doesn't seem to realise it!

(Please excuse my typing. My computer is being fixed so I'm on my phone.)

Demon1
Posts: 1
Joined: Feb 2015

Hello all,

 

I am a 12 year survivor from t cell lymphobalstic lymphoma and I experience fatigue every day. I also have a lot of pain in my bones and joints. I have tinnitus in my ears. I must say that also my immune system is not as strong as it was before the cancer. I am very pleased to find out that I am not the only one who have such problems. I am tired of explenations of doctors that are saying that there is nothing wrong with me and that all exams are normal. I work 8 or some days 10 hours a day. I have a stressful job and some days I am exausted. I have a small babygirl at home and some days I don't have even the force to play with her. Nobody understands me. I really can't explain how I feel some days. Every time when I feel really bad and tired I think that the cancer is coming back. I tried a lot of alternative methods but none seems to help. I tried various diets, bioenergetics, yoga...

But every day I thank god that I am still allive an that I can see my daughter growing up. I think that I must just live every day at a time and try to squeeze the best out of it.

Ecxuse my english, because it is not my mother langugage.

 

Thank you again. I am really happy to find out that I am not alone and there are others out there that feel like I do and that are living in such a way.

Good life to all!!!

 

skwonglee
Posts: 1
Joined: May 2015

I am so glad that I found this chain of posts.  It is comforting to know that I'm not imagining the fatigue.  Thank you all for your posts.

Although I am much better than 2 years ago when I completed treatment, I still feel tired, both physically and mentally.  Now I can do mentally heavy tasks such as reading/writing for about 4 hours if I take breaks in between to do something else such as preparing ingredients for dinner.  However, it is not nearly enough to go back to my computer programming/project technical lead job.  I have given up on the hope that I would ever be able to do this type of work again.  I am hoping that I can find another type of work and work part time.

 

   

 

cif
Posts: 10
Joined: Jul 2015

If your are like me, reading all these posts has confirmed you are not alone and not lazy.  With Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+++ I did 6 rounds chemo and one year Herceptin, I was too exhausted and damaged to accept radiation so I declined, not sure doctors would draw the line between ratio of benefit to harm.  In hind sight, I was informed later that had I done the radiation it would not have decreased my odds of recurrence and exposure could  have made things worse.  All I know is by the third chemo my speach was halted and slurred, wrong words, fell as often as I stood, and all the prior posting symptoms like losing time, getting lost, relearning to use things like kitchen without burning house down, the body pain and aches ... oh.

  But I also had to relearn to read, relearning math, was first chair musician and now can't even read music nor care about music.  I was also a highly sought after full life cycle computer engineer and technical writer, and now having to relearn how to make a post like this.  Spouse hooked up Dragon software to type for me, which with chemo induced speech issues makes posting interesting.  The point of this post is, you are not alone with with having to relearn a new YOU, having to relearn to read, spell, right words, balance, driving, not gettin lost, not messing up dates and appointments or having to relearn skills to just keep self and family fed.  I went from computer genius to practically needing the GEEK squad to plug in the TV. 

Today's world I can go from having an almost 'Normal before cancer day' to kissing the pavement without notice.  You are not nuts, not alone, and I have yet bumped into a doctor that has heard of all the issues folks have posted here, nor do they welcome a link to it, sadly.  I'm working on trying new skill sets, but honestly it takes the whole day (month) just to get a normal days worth of tasks done for survival like cleaning, meals, bills.  If you create more of chaos in your home while trying to organize it, you're not alone on that either - but if you figure out solution please post.  I can only say this, it is alot more fun relearning and more appreciative learning things the second time around, although I'm also learning somethings may not get back (e.g., music, math, spelling, grammer, higher reading levels) but not without trying.  Hang in there, DO NOT LET YOU be your worst enemy, give yourself a break and learn to be a new you.  Yes, YOGA makes a difference, the tame kind like Classical Stretch: The Esmonde Technique, not hard core 'feel the pain no gain' kind.  And when you hear folks say they'd rather pick up dog poo for a living then work another day at their job, smile, because I used to say that and now, well, guess what I did yesterday.  So yes, chemo croses the blood brain barrier regardless what the medical field believes.

If you are reading this post you are tired, so before taking nap eat a power meal (mix an avocado with a can of sardines and spread on toast), wolf down a peach, then take a nap.  When you get up start your 20 min yoga or stretch session, smell a flower and try to see what image the clouds are shaping and smile, say a prayer for those less fortunate and cherish what you have.  Now to I need to go practice what I just posted.  Virtual hugs, they are sincere.

shadow01's picture
shadow01
Posts: 15
Joined: Oct 2008

I hate to do this ... I really do, but.....  Me too.  :-)

After my first cancer, I was left with low testosterone (testicular cancer, one of them had to go), hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone leves---my thyroid was damaged by whole-brain/max-dose radiation therapy used to destroy anything left of the three brain tumors (2nd met) after the brain surgeries), and low B-12 (happened around the same time, but may not be related).  All of these, individually, can lead to fatigue, depression, etc.   I've been giving myself injections for the testosterone and B-12, and Synthroid for the thyroid, and I've still got low energy levels.  If I remember what I read a few days ago correctly (chemobrain), radiation therapy and chemo can both cause this.  Don't quote me on that, though.  Before those were being treated, my weight went very high (I'm guessing as high as 425--450), and I had no way of doing anything about it (an endocrinologist later confirmed that---there was nothing I could have done to stop the weight gain).  Once on the meds, my weight started to fall rapidly...to a point.  The rest of it is STILL fighting back.  At my last appointment with my primary care doc, who is also an internal medicine specialist (and is now handling all of this stuff for me now), a few weeks ago, I asked about this (both the weight issue and the continued low energy).  He put me on a legal ampthetamine called Adipex-P.  I still have to get an ultrasound of my heart (Fri) to see if I can stay on it, and it is addicting, so I don't know how long I'll be able to stay on it, but I actually have more energy now.  It still crashes to zero at some point during the day (and below zero if I don't stop what I'm doing immediately), but while I have energy, I have a lot more.

So y'all might want to ask your doctor about it.  Based on what he told me, it's not safe for everyone, so your doctor may not let you take it.  I know I'm going to ask if I can stay on this long-term (as in, for as long as I'll be on the injections and the Synthroid ... rest of my life).

Like I told him at my appointment .... Every year, around April, I tell myself, "This is the year I will be able to get my kayak back out on the Gulf."  And every year, so far, I've been wrong.  It's getting ridiculous, and I really want to get my kayak back out on the Gulf!  :-)

kmnichols58
Posts: 2
Joined: Oct 2015

you are not alone, its been 4 yrs since treatment started and some days i feel worse than when i was going thru it all, i had TNBC and cancer free but these side effects are awful..praying for you

peachie60
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2017

I have started experiencing extreme fatique this week also.  It will be 2 years this August 2017, since I had surgery and brachytherapy for a very rare type cancer.  I am so glad that I found this message board and am seeing that I am not alone in feeling so tired all the time with very little energy.  I am trying to work my full-time job, and find it really hard to get up lately and get moving.  I also have the Fibromyalgia along with Osteoarthritis.

Hellokitty7
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2017

I had breast cancer. It's been six years and I'm still suffering from fatigue. I'm always tried. I eat healthy and take vitamins but nothing seems to help. So no, you're not alone. 

Hellokitty7
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2017

I had breast cancer. It's been six years and I'm still suffering from fatigue. I'm always tried. I eat healthy and take vitamins but nothing seems to help. So no, you're not alone. 

cilla1982
Posts: 4
Joined: Jul 2017

hello my friend,im still dealing with chronic fatigue 3 years later,doctors have been no help so far,just pacing myself,plenty of sunshine,and listening to relaxing music..i hope daily they find a answer for all of us..well wishes cilla

kih
Posts: 4
Joined: Jun 2017

i am feel tired, looks like pos fatigue of cancer

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