Husband just diagnosed with prostate cancer

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lteschler
lteschler Member Posts: 3 *
edited July 8 in Prostate Cancer #1

Good afternoon, we just received the results from the biopsy, and I'm concerned for my husband.

Gleason Score 7 (4+3) grade group 3, cores with cancer 8 (out of 12), prostate biopsies Adenocarcinoma, perineural invasion seen. PIRAD 5, PSA 9.5.

Prostate measures 4.0 x 4.9 x 4.0 cm with volume of 41 cc. Large right peripheral zone PIRAD 5 lesion

He is scheduled for his PET scan in two weeks and we see an oncologist two weeks after. I'm really scared.

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  • wworker
    wworker Member Posts: 8 Member
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    When you first get biopsy results that are positive for cancer, it is always difficult to handle.

    I would guess most people on this forum felt the same way you feel at one time or another during the process. I know I did (and sometimes still do).

    My best advise for you is to learn all you can about the treatment options. Knowledge is power and will help with the fear.

    You're not alone.

  • Marlon
    Marlon Member Posts: 46 Member
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    Please know that there are many of us that have been there and know how it feels. I have kept in mind that PC is still one of the most curable cancers here is.

  • Clevelandguy
    Clevelandguy Member Posts: 1,088 Member
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    Hi,

    Once you get the PET scan you can start to decide your future medical options. I too had Perineurial invasion and ten years later I am still around and kickin. I have included a link for you and your husband to study. After you meet with his doctor team we have plenty of experienced survivors here that can help guide you if you so desire. Remember great doctors+great facilities = great results. Good luck…………

    https://www.cancer.org/cancer/types/prostate-cancer/treating.html

    Dave 3+4

  • On_A_Journey
    On_A_Journey Member Posts: 115 Member
    edited July 4 #5
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    @Iteschler , first of all welcome, and secondly, things will be all okay.

    So much has changed even in the nine years since my prostatectomy. The fact that you husband is getting a PET scan straight after diagnosis to pinpoint where the cells are, which will open up all sorts of treatment options that weren't available to me, including non-invasive ones…you guys are actually in a good position!

    I hope I haven't made you think that I'm trying to trivialize your concerns. It is perfectly natural to worry, particularly through these early stages. My advice: Go along for the ride together, collectively do as much research as you can between appointments, know that you're not alone, and most importantly, know that you guys are doing the right thing by following up.

    One question: What is your husband's age?

  • lteschler
    lteschler Member Posts: 3 *
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  • lteschler
    lteschler Member Posts: 3 *
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    Thank you so much for your encouragement. I’m so grateful that I found this forum. My husband is 66.

  • Old Salt
    Old Salt Member Posts: 1,420 Member
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    All good advice.

    I presume your husband is seeing a urologist. He/she will likely recommend some kind of therapy. Many urologists are not up-to-date on radiation options for prostate cancer. I see that you will be speaking with an oncologist later on. Will that be a radiation oncologist?

    Best wishes; as others have eloquently written, there is hope for a normal future for the two of you.

  • Marlon
    Marlon Member Posts: 46 Member
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    Old Salt gave great advice. My urologist is a surgeon, but suggested that I get an opinion from a radiation oncologist (also a urologist) and referred me to one. So I had opinions on both options. There's a lot of information to absorb, so I was glad to read the Walsh book first, so I could understand what they were talking about, and have better informed questions.

  • On_A_Journey
    On_A_Journey Member Posts: 115 Member
    edited July 5 #10
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    No worries, all good. The reason I asked is that if he is, say 86, there would be an excellent chance of not even needing to bother with treatment down the track. But being only 66 has an advantage too, being still relatively young and presumably fit and strong, putting your husband in good stead. I'm sure he will come through any future treatment with flying colors. You both will.

    Even with Gleason 4+3 and PSA 9.5 there is no reason to suggest that your husband's longevity has been compromised yet. He will definitely need some sort of treatment soon, but life should return to something like normal after that. Get the tests done, meet with the specialists, and do what you can to knock those little bandits out of his body. And after that, keep going back for regular checks and meetings with the relevant specialist.

    All things considered, your husband's diagnosis and future treatment is just another stitch in the rich tapestry of life. Good luck with it all!

  • ProfWagstaff
    ProfWagstaff Member Posts: 104 Member
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    I know each case is different but sometimes it helps to hear of similar cases and how they turned out. I was diagnosed in 2009 with a psa of 20.4 and a 4+3 gleason. I had DaVinci surgery in 2009 and salvage radiation in 2011. I'm still here. Treatments have advanced just in the past decade so get all your treatment options and decide from there. After getting your options, you can ask thus forum for more info about any specific treatment. People who have undergone that treatment will be more than glad to share their stories. You can use me for info on DaVinci surgery or IMRT radiation.

  • John_R
    John_R Member Posts: 3 Member
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    I'm so sorry to hear that you are going through this. It can be very frightening, particularly (as some others have mentioned) when you first get a diagnosis. I'm new here having just joined. My situation is similar, Gleeson 9, grade 3.5, some local lymph node incursion and also a seminal vesicle and bladder neck. I've had a radical prostatectomy and I'm about to begin 2 yrs of hormone treatment and also radiation. There has been great advice here. ClevelandGuy mentioned great doctors and great facilities and I have found that to be true. After things moved very slowly at a more local Urology dept, I moved my care to UC San Francisco, which has state-of-the art facilities and surgeons who are the best at what they do. It has made a world of difference. I also got "Dr. Patrick Walsh's Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer" and it has helped me a great deal in researching with my wife, and knowing what to ask the doctors regarding various forms of treatment. It also gives thorough information on all types of treatments, pros and cons, side effects, etc. As someone else mentioned, I had conferences with both the surgeon and the radiologists to hear about each treatment option before making my choice. What I tell myself is that I just have to take the next right action. I wish you and your husband strength as you take up this challenge.