Endometrial Serous Carcinoma stage 3C

Miha
Miha Member Posts: 24 Member
edited December 5 in Uterine Cancer #1


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Comments

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 771 Member

    Again, welcome to our page. Do you have some questions or concerns? There is so much information here you can read. Or you can ask your own questions.

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    I would like to know if there are others with Endometrial Serous Carcinoma, stage 3C and what were the treatments recommended. I was told that I can't have surgery because the tumor is too big. I will have third chemo treatment on the 7th of November with Paclitaxol and Carboplatin. (Also Her2/neu at 2+)


    Please give me hope

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 771 Member

    Zsazsa1 is someone who comes to mind. Her tumor was not as big, but she is 4 years out after treatment. You can search for her story and treatment. There are others at that stage who are doing fine, and I hope they comment here. You do have hope. We are a statistic of one.

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    Thank you so much for your generosity sharing and for your response.

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,082 Member

    Miha, are they doing any getting testing? There are so many new things being done, and this is not a one-size fits all with any of these cancers.

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    Hi,

    Thank you for your reply. The oncologists planning to do a scan after the third chemo treatment.

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,082 Member

    I'm sorry - I meant genetic testing. (not thinking here!) Do you have genetic mutations. Some are very susceptible to immunotherapy.

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    ER nuclear positive 25% of the tumor cells

    PgR nuclear positive in 4-5% with the tumor cells

    P53 Intense nuclear positive over expressed with immunophenotypic pattern

    of mutant type in more than 90% of the tumor cells

    Her2/neu 2+

    Ki67 cell proliferation index nuclear positive about 75% of the tumor cells

    This is all I know, please advise

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 771 Member

    The chemo will hopefully shrink the tumor. You don't say if you had spread outside your uterus. But If you didn't that is encouraging. Did they do scans before chemo? I think the scan after chemo will be to see if the tumor shrunk. Hopefully that will be true. Sometimes they can do surgery if the tumor shrinks during chemo.

    I had Ki67 75% too and P53 positive. I have not recurred. These two markers are common mutations in all cancer cells. I never knew about my ER and PR. These have to do with estrogen and progesterone receptors on your cancer cells. The ER+ and PR+ mean you can have immunotherapy with certain effective medications.

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    Thank you so much for all the info you provided. It's priceless! Yes, it did spread outside of the uterus, based on the CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis.

    Thank you again for everything

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 771 Member

    I am here to help because I remember what a difficult time this is. I will pray that your tumor shrinks and they can take it out!

  • FourBee
    FourBee Member Posts: 45 Member

    Dear Miha,

    You don't mention where you are getting treatment? Is it a teaching hospital? Are you eligible for any clinical trials? I had Avastin in addition to the combo that you are getting. It blows up your blood pressure but may suppress tumor growth. Ask your doctor. A lot has changed since I had treatment 10 years ago.

    Have you gotten 2nd and 3rd opinions? I had several opinions as to what I should do. Two were free! One I got by emailing a doc at Stanford and the other I got from an organization that gives free 2nd opinions to CA residents. I strongly encourage you to keep asking questions and researching your cancer.

    Sending hugs across the net.

    Four Bee

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    Thank you so much for your kindness and generosity. I will ask more questions tomorrow at my 3rd chemo treatment and I will update. Thank you so much!

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    hello,

    I have been reading recently that minimally invasive radical hysterectomy was associated with lower rates of disease free survival and overral survival compared with abdominal radical hysterectomy.

    Any thoughts?

    Thank you

    Miha

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 771 Member

    That is a technical question. A radical hysterectomy removes part of the vagina I believe. A total hysterectomy removes the cervix but not the vagina. So your question about a radical hysterectomy may be specific. The articles I have read say that minimally invasive surgery has been shown to have no difference in recurrence. But having said that, my surgeon decided to remove my uterus through my abdomen because it was large. And I suspect that in the back of their mind is the thought of "seeding" cancer. That is cells escaping during surgery and growing. And it seems to me that if there was a question about that, the surgeon opts for abdominal incision. So to answer your question, I have not read anything that said the surgery method changed recurrence rates or overall survival. These articles I have read do not differentiate between total and radical hysterectomy.

    Sue

  • MoeKay
    MoeKay Member Posts: 418 Member

    Hi Miha,

    I did a little research on your question. Do you know if what you read had to do with cervical cancer, rather than uterine/endometrial cancer? The 2020 study, entitled, "Survival After Minimally Invasive vs. Open Radical Hysterectomy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer," published in JAMA Oncology by Roni Nitecki, M.D. et al. , states as follows:

    "CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies found that among patients undergoing radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer, minimally invasive radical hysterectomy was associated with an elevated risk of recurrence and death compared with open surgery."

    Citation to full online study from which above conclusions were taken: JAMA Oncol. 2020;6(7):1019-1027. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.1694

    Also, here's a link to a National Cancer Institute (NCI) article entitled, "For Early-Stage Cervical Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery Declining" https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/cancer-currents-blog/2021/cervical-cancer-minimally-invasive-surgery-declining

    If you read the NCI's above article, you will see that the article says:

    "One burning question on many researchers’ minds is why minimally invasive surgery would be less effective than open surgery in this particular situation and not for other gynecologic conditions (e.g., uterine cancer)."

    So although I do not know, I suspect what you've been reading may relate to cervical cancer, not endometrial or uterine cancer. If you have other information, please share it with us.

    Just as a bit of information on myself, I had an open abdominal radical hysterectomy for endometrial cancer in 1999, years before minimally-invasive procedures began to be utilized for any gynecologic cancer.

    Wishing you the best,

    MoeKay


  • MoeKay
    MoeKay Member Posts: 418 Member
    edited November 13 #18

    Hello again, Miha,

    I want to update my above post (#17 from Nov. 12th) because, after additional research, I did find a July 22, 2021 study on minimally-invasive surgery for endometrial cancer. See: https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/home/cancer-topics/gynecologic-cancer/endometrial-cancer-removing-large-uterus-minimally-invasive-risk/

    This article states in pertinent part that, "extraction of a large uterus via minimally invasive surgery for high-grade endometrial cancer (HGEC) was associated with an increased risk of intra-abdominal/vaginal disease recurrence, according to results of a study published in Gynecologic Oncology."

    At the bottom of the article, there is a link to the study itself. Since this is obviously an area of very recent and ongoing research, your gynecologic oncologist would be in the best position to advise you of how these recent developments may relate to your particular situation.

    Good luck!

    MoeKay

  • Miha
    Miha Member Posts: 24 Member

    Thank you so much MoeKay! I made an appointment with the gynecologist/ oncologist to discuss this recent and ongoing findings.

    Thank you.

    Much love and gratitude

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 771 Member

    That is quite an important study in my opinion. Good research Moekay. It might be worth a post all on its own.

  • ncg007
    ncg007 Member Posts: 137 Member

    There is hope! I am 6+ years out from IIIC1, high grade. Mixed 50% Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma and 50% Uterine Serous Carcinoma. Cancer spread to cervix and lymph nodes.

    I had total hysterectomy and simultaneous chemo & radiation , 2 rounds Cisplatin along with 28 external radiation treatment. Followed by 4 rounds of carboplatin/paclitaxel.

    Definitely get additional opinions, it is never too late for that. I got three which resulted in the aggressive simultaneous treatment.

    You are not alone.