Reacurance rectal cancer

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Tracey1969
Tracey1969 Member Posts: 14

Hi there,has any one had a reacurance rectal cancer?? 

My husband has just been diagnosed with another tumor in the pelvic area

what was the chemo like?? 

Opertation?? 

After surgery?? Was there more chemo?? 

He has no cancer anywhere else.. 

the surgeon kept saying it will effect his quality of life as it’s near a nerve

sorry for all the questions:)

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  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
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    My recurrance was in the liver.  I had surgery in April 2014 and no follow-up chemo - though it was talked about.  I have been NED (No Evidence of Disease) every since. 

    Ask as many questions as you would like. We are all here to answer in our part. 

    Tru

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
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    If they are talking about surgery and treatment it could mean radiation with chemo first or just radiation, then surgery, then more chemo, but it all depends on what the surgeon's plans are.  Until then, you have to ask a lot of questions.  It could mean that the recurrence is close to the sphincter muscle it could mean that he might need an ostomy of some type, but then again that is another discussion with the doctor.  Mine was also rectal cancer so if you get a chance read my "about me" page and it might give you some insight as to what I've been through.  I'm glad that he has no spreading elsewhere.  Wishing your husband luck.

    Kim

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478 Member
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    I wish I could help but I

    I wish I could help but I haven't had that experience, either. I hope you get some answers.

    Jan

  • Tracey1969
    Tracey1969 Member Posts: 14
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    Hi.. we have started chemo..

    Hi.. we have started chemo.. hes doing the treatment called capox.. tablets and iv

    Then surgery :(

    any advice how to cope for the next 3 months 

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,381 Member
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    Hi.. we have started chemo..

    Hi.. we have started chemo.. hes doing the treatment called capox.. tablets and iv

    Then surgery :(

    any advice how to cope for the next 3 months 

    Capecitabine (Xeloda) and Oxaliplatin

    Tracey:  There are a lot of posts on both these drugs.  There are definately steps one can take to be prepared--things like having anti-nausea drugs ready in advance, having some gloves (for cold sensitivity), and using hand and foot cream through the treatment.  If you seach the posts for these terms, I am confident you will find abundant tips--way more than the doctor will give you.  Good luck on this journey.

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
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    Hi.. we have started chemo..

    Hi.. we have started chemo.. hes doing the treatment called capox.. tablets and iv

    Then surgery :(

    any advice how to cope for the next 3 months 

    It's a big topic. I started

    It's a big topic. I started Capox in December and will finish up in about five weeks. It's pretty tough stuff for most - I have run into a very few that got through it with little difficulty.

    He would likely get a chest port (minor surgery) for the Oxaliplatin, one of the two drugs. The other drug is capecitabine, with Xeloda as the brand name quite often. He should have had training so he somewhat knows what the potential side-effects are but they often get worse with successive treatments. There are a lot of posts on this regimen and how we deal with the side-effects but I don't think that they're in a convenient location.

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
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    Xeloda and Oxy

    Both have their own side effects.  The Xeloda (oral) wasn't too bad for me but the Oxy was really hard.  If there are symptoms of lingering tingling from one infusion to the other without going away you need to address the doctor and let them know.  If not it could be possible there their will be long term side effects from this drug where it causes permanent neuropathy.  Capox is not a term I've heard of but mine was FOLFOX.  Just make sure that if hubby has anything that doesn't feel right during treatment that he contact the doctor.  Wishing him well.

    Kim

  • Tracey1969
    Tracey1969 Member Posts: 14
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    itS a kras mutation :( what

    itS a kras mutation :( what does that mean??

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
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    itS a kras mutation :( what

    itS a kras mutation :( what does that mean??

     

    MGH

     

    KRAS is a gene that provides the code for making a protein, KRAS, which is involved primarily in controlling cell division. This protein is part of the MAP kinase signaling cascade (RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK) that relays chemical signals from outside the cell to the cell's nucleus and is primarily involved in controlling cell division. KRAS is an enzyme (a GTPase) that converts a molecule called GTP into GDP. When KRAS is attached (bound) to GDP, it's in its "off" position and can't send signals to the nucleus. But when a GTP molecule arrives and binds to KRAS, KRAS is activated and sends its signal, and then it converts the GTP into GDP and returns to the "off" position.

    When mutated, KRAS can act as an oncogene, causing normal cells to become cancerous. The mutations can shift the KRAS protein into the "on" position all the time. KRAS mutations are common in pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers. These KRAS mutations are said to be somatic, because instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous.

    Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested.

    Source: Genetics Home Reference

    http://targetedcancercare.massgeneral.org/My-Trial-Guide/Genes/KRAS/G12D-(c-35G-A).aspx

  • Tracey1969
    Tracey1969 Member Posts: 14
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    Mikenh said:

     

    MGH

     

    KRAS is a gene that provides the code for making a protein, KRAS, which is involved primarily in controlling cell division. This protein is part of the MAP kinase signaling cascade (RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK) that relays chemical signals from outside the cell to the cell's nucleus and is primarily involved in controlling cell division. KRAS is an enzyme (a GTPase) that converts a molecule called GTP into GDP. When KRAS is attached (bound) to GDP, it's in its "off" position and can't send signals to the nucleus. But when a GTP molecule arrives and binds to KRAS, KRAS is activated and sends its signal, and then it converts the GTP into GDP and returns to the "off" position.

    When mutated, KRAS can act as an oncogene, causing normal cells to become cancerous. The mutations can shift the KRAS protein into the "on" position all the time. KRAS mutations are common in pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers. These KRAS mutations are said to be somatic, because instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous.

    Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested.

    Source: Genetics Home Reference

    http://targetedcancercare.massgeneral.org/My-Trial-Guide/Genes/KRAS/G12D-(c-35G-A).aspx

    Thank u... so u think it’s

    Thank u... so u think it’s bad... ?  All cancer is bad.. but is this real bad:( I feel the oncologist isnt very hopeful:(

  • sflgirl
    sflgirl Member Posts: 220 Member
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    Mikenh said:

     

    MGH

     

    KRAS is a gene that provides the code for making a protein, KRAS, which is involved primarily in controlling cell division. This protein is part of the MAP kinase signaling cascade (RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK) that relays chemical signals from outside the cell to the cell's nucleus and is primarily involved in controlling cell division. KRAS is an enzyme (a GTPase) that converts a molecule called GTP into GDP. When KRAS is attached (bound) to GDP, it's in its "off" position and can't send signals to the nucleus. But when a GTP molecule arrives and binds to KRAS, KRAS is activated and sends its signal, and then it converts the GTP into GDP and returns to the "off" position.

    When mutated, KRAS can act as an oncogene, causing normal cells to become cancerous. The mutations can shift the KRAS protein into the "on" position all the time. KRAS mutations are common in pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers. These KRAS mutations are said to be somatic, because instead of coming from a parent and being present in every cell (hereditary), they are acquired during the course of a person's life and are found only in cells that become cancerous.

    Tumor mutation profiling performed clinically at the MGH Cancer Center has identified KRAS mutations across a broad-spectrum of cancer types. The highest incidence of KRAS mutations have been found in pancreatic cancer (70%), colon cancer (30%), lung cancer (25%), cholangiocarcinoma (15-20%), acute myeloid leukemia (15-20%) and endometrial cancer (15-20%). Across the other major tumor types, KRAS mutations have been found in less than 10% of cases that have been tested.

    Source: Genetics Home Reference

    http://targetedcancercare.massgeneral.org/My-Trial-Guide/Genes/KRAS/G12D-(c-35G-A).aspx

    Great info

    Mike

    This is a great resource, thanks much.

    Andrea

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
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    itS a kras mutation :( what

    itS a kras mutation :( what does that mean??

    Treatment

    Others have posted but that was also a question to my doctor but it depended on what treatment you were on that if they would test you for it or not.  Mine didn't have that mutation but hope you got the answer you needed.

    Kim

  • steveja
    steveja Member Posts: 41
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    Thank u... so u think it’s

    Thank u... so u think it’s bad... ?  All cancer is bad.. but is this real bad:( I feel the oncologist isnt very hopeful:(

    No cancer is good, and no recurrence is ever a happy event.

    Any recurrence is bad in the sense that if it spread to ptA, then it may have spread to ptB & ptC too.  Recurrence (metastasis) almost always means chemo - if the patient can tolerate it - to addres the systemic spread.   The very good news is that IF the recurrent tumor is resectable (surgery applies) then there is a much better chance for long-term survival.  Any KRAS mutation gives modestly worse odds and dictates the type of treatment, but that's not a  cause for much incremental worry.

     

    >>I feel the oncologist isnt very hopeful:(

    Ask, don't read between the lines.

     

  • Tracey1969
    Tracey1969 Member Posts: 14
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    Thought I’d give u the

    Thought I’d give u the lastest 

    The chemo didn’t shrink the tumor.. but it didn’t grow.. we went and saw the specialist surgeon yesterday.. what he had to say was scary.. 

    there is a 1 in 3 chance of survival in 5 years at this stage.. if we just did surgery next week he would have a life of chronic pain and his foot wouldn't work and still a 33% of survival.. 

    if we do radiation then surgery his survival rate is 50/50 and the chance of keeping his foot etc is better

    So we are seeing the radiation team on Monday.. to start pretty quickly 

    Hopefully like anything no cancer seeds have got out.. fingers crossed 

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
    edited August 2018 #16
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    Thought I’d give u the

    Thought I’d give u the lastest 

    The chemo didn’t shrink the tumor.. but it didn’t grow.. we went and saw the specialist surgeon yesterday.. what he had to say was scary.. 

    there is a 1 in 3 chance of survival in 5 years at this stage.. if we just did surgery next week he would have a life of chronic pain and his foot wouldn't work and still a 33% of survival.. 

    if we do radiation then surgery his survival rate is 50/50 and the chance of keeping his foot etc is better

    So we are seeing the radiation team on Monday.. to start pretty quickly 

    Hopefully like anything no cancer seeds have got out.. fingers crossed 

    Stats

    Try not to think of the stats. I was given the 5 year talk, 5 years eight months ago, and I'm running wild and loving it.  

    And what is 50/50? 60/40, 52/48.... do you get what I mean?  His situation is not pretty, but concentrate on the positive and let the negative take care of itself. 

    What is wrong with his foot?  Is he diabetic? 

    Radiation can be quite the ride, and I'm not talking the 'joy' kind. I wish him luck. I wish you both the best. 

    Tru

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
    edited August 2018 #17
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    Sorry

    Sorry you didn't get better news but don't listen to the doctors or the internet on stats.  Every one is different and tolerates things different.  I'm not sure how the losing the foot has to do with the colo/rectal cancer?  I've not heard of it going that far.  Wishing your husband well.

    Kim

  • Tracey1969
    Tracey1969 Member Posts: 14
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    Sorry

    Sorry you didn't get better news but don't listen to the doctors or the internet on stats.  Every one is different and tolerates things different.  I'm not sure how the losing the foot has to do with the colo/rectal cancer?  I've not heard of it going that far.  Wishing your husband well.

    Kim

    The reacurance tumor is

    The reacurance tumor is growing next to a nerve in leg.. and to get a good margin the would have to server it..

    his is rectal cancer.. there’s a lot of nerves down there

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
    Options

    The reacurance tumor is

    The reacurance tumor is growing next to a nerve in leg.. and to get a good margin the would have to server it..

    his is rectal cancer.. there’s a lot of nerves down there

    Amputation

    I do remember, when I first joined this forum (2013), there was a member, English he was, who had his whole leg amputated, possibly from the hip - hard for me to recall.  I can't remember why, it might have been because of spread to the bones. 

    I am sorry that your husband faces this decision. It must be quite rare for CRC.  

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,381 Member
    Options

    Thought I’d give u the

    Thought I’d give u the lastest 

    The chemo didn’t shrink the tumor.. but it didn’t grow.. we went and saw the specialist surgeon yesterday.. what he had to say was scary.. 

    there is a 1 in 3 chance of survival in 5 years at this stage.. if we just did surgery next week he would have a life of chronic pain and his foot wouldn't work and still a 33% of survival.. 

    if we do radiation then surgery his survival rate is 50/50 and the chance of keeping his foot etc is better

    So we are seeing the radiation team on Monday.. to start pretty quickly 

    Hopefully like anything no cancer seeds have got out.. fingers crossed 

    Statistics

    The statistics are like a punch in the gut, or at least that is the way I felt when I first researched mine.  But as board members will keep reminding you, your loved one is not a statistic. As for me, I do everything I can do to be in the survival portion of the statistic and to live each day to its fullest.

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
    Options
    Trubrit said:

    Amputation

    I do remember, when I first joined this forum (2013), there was a member, English he was, who had his whole leg amputated, possibly from the hip - hard for me to recall.  I can't remember why, it might have been because of spread to the bones. 

    I am sorry that your husband faces this decision. It must be quite rare for CRC.  

    Yes

    His name was Steved and now remember that this was the first surgery of it's kind.  It had spread to the pelvic region. Thanks for the explanation about the nerve, that makes sense now.  I'm sorry he is going through this.

    Kim