Questions on personal items in the hospital

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Mikenh
Mikenh Member Posts: 777

Looks like I can post new topics now (hooray!).

I received a package from the hospital yesterday and it indicated that I shouldn't have any valuables on me and they discouraged things like phones, cash, checkbooks, etc.

How did others handle this? I would like to be able to communicate with others when I'm back in the room but that would be hard to do if they don't permit communications devices. I'd also like to have my laptop with me to keep an eye on things at work and with trading. If I can't do that, then I'd need a phone to talk to my daughter to manage my positions. I suppose that I could give my devices to someone and then have them bring them to me after surgery as I'd be in my room most of the time.

Or is it so rough that I shouldn't be thinking about these things while in the hospital?

thanks,

mike

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Comments

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
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    Take what you want

    they will just tell you that if it gets stolen, its not their responsibility. 

    I HAD to have my iPad. I used the music app on it, to get to sleep every night, or to calm me during the day. I left it on my bedside table, and had no problems. 

    And yes and no. It is rough, and the first day out you'll probably roll around in pain. But the second day (or when the powers that be, give you the thumbs up), you need to get out of bed, no matter the pain, and get yourself walking. So, if you can walk, you can talk (or type). 

    Hope this helps. 

    Tru

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
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    Trubrit said:

    Take what you want

    they will just tell you that if it gets stolen, its not their responsibility. 

    I HAD to have my iPad. I used the music app on it, to get to sleep every night, or to calm me during the day. I left it on my bedside table, and had no problems. 

    And yes and no. It is rough, and the first day out you'll probably roll around in pain. But the second day (or when the powers that be, give you the thumbs up), you need to get out of bed, no matter the pain, and get yourself walking. So, if you can walk, you can talk (or type). 

    Hope this helps. 

    Tru

    Yup, that helps. I'd really

    Yup, that helps. I'd really like to have my MacBook Pro, phone and running watch with me. I think that that's all I really need.

  • PamRav
    PamRav Member Posts: 348 Member
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    Kept the phone

    My post op nurse was sooooo terrible, horrible, and incompetent that I made my family leave my phone with me in case I needed to call them for help  

    Might do you good just to rest and take a few days off.  (Meant in the nicest possible way)

    Hope all goes well and you hav a speedy recovery.  

     

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
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    PamRav said:

    Kept the phone

    My post op nurse was sooooo terrible, horrible, and incompetent that I made my family leave my phone with me in case I needed to call them for help  

    Might do you good just to rest and take a few days off.  (Meant in the nicest possible way)

    Hope all goes well and you hav a speedy recovery.  

     

    Oh, Pam!

    I'm sorry you had a bad experience with a nurse. 

    I used my phone to take pictures of the mess left behind by one of the nurses. Empty IV bag on the bed, syringe on the floor. She was reported, pictures and all. 

    Tru

  • Tunadog
    Tunadog Member Posts: 235 Member
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    I took my iPad and iPhone..

    Cool  I took my iPad and iPhone And they were very useful.

     I was in the hospital for 6 days 

  • airborne72
    airborne72 Member Posts: 301 Member
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    Take What You Want

    Mike:

    The only issue with stuff is security and the hospital's liability.  That's why they discourage it.  It just depends on your level of trust.  They will cut you open and inject potentially lethal drugs in you; if you trust them to do that then it seems trivial to worry about theivery.

    Mine served me good purpose - connection with anywhere other than the hospital.  I detest the television and never turned it on.  Instead, I would monitor my smart phone and on ocassion fire up the laptop.  It was heavier so that required real focus.

    My communications were social and informational only.  I did not have the presence of mind to do anything cognitive that had consequences.

    Here's a thought, if you want me to handle your portfolio during your hospitalization then sign me in.  I promise to not swindle your accounts.

    Jim

  • zx10guy
    zx10guy Member Posts: 273 Member
    edited October 2017 #8
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    I'm a tech nerd and work in

    I'm a tech nerd and work in the IT industry.  Both times I was in the hospital, I brought a stack of tech with me.  I had my laptop, my smart phone, an ultraportable micro PC, a device called a remote access point (RAP), and a power pack that could power all of the aforementioned equipment.

    The ultraportable PC and the RAP was brought because I distrust publically available wireless.  This equipment allows me to utilize the open wireless provided by the hospital to create a secure VPN tunnel back to my home network.  Once the connection to my home network was up, the RAP would broadcast the wireless networks I have running at home at the hospital.  I did the same thing when I was going through chemo at the clinic.

    TV wise, I didn't watch the hospital provided TV.  I used my laptop and a Sling Box to watch my DirecTV service I had at home.

    I was also fortunate both times I was in the hospital (same for both procedures) that my surgeon is one of the chief surgeons there.  He always arranges private rooms for his patients.

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
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    Personals

    All my personals were in a luggage carry on bag that we had left in the car.  Once in the room, my husband went back to the car and got it and then brought it to the room.  If someone is with you they can bring your personals after you have gotten a room.  It's much easier.  My first operation my husband lugged it around the whole hospital for a 5 hour surgery - poor guy.  Should have just left it in the car to begin with.  Hope that you can get your personals fairly easy.

    Kim

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
    edited October 2017 #10
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    zx10guy said:

    I'm a tech nerd and work in

    I'm a tech nerd and work in the IT industry.  Both times I was in the hospital, I brought a stack of tech with me.  I had my laptop, my smart phone, an ultraportable micro PC, a device called a remote access point (RAP), and a power pack that could power all of the aforementioned equipment.

    The ultraportable PC and the RAP was brought because I distrust publically available wireless.  This equipment allows me to utilize the open wireless provided by the hospital to create a secure VPN tunnel back to my home network.  Once the connection to my home network was up, the RAP would broadcast the wireless networks I have running at home at the hospital.  I did the same thing when I was going through chemo at the clinic.

    TV wise, I didn't watch the hospital provided TV.  I used my laptop and a Sling Box to watch my DirecTV service I had at home.

    I was also fortunate both times I was in the hospital (same for both procedures) that my surgeon is one of the chief surgeons there.  He always arranges private rooms for his patients.

    The hospital sent me a packet

    The hospital sent me a packet a few days ago and they have a "Pavillion Floor" which is optional. It sounds like a VIP floor - all private rooms, gourmet meals, etc. The cancer floors are lower but they have special air filtration systems to minimize the chances of infection for those on chemo. I may call them and see what they charge for private rooms. I've never been in the hospital for an overnight stay before but I have stayed with others overnight and visited others in the hospital and I worked in one for about four years so I have a good idea as to how they work. I'd never considered the potential for theft before, both from staff, contractors, your roommate or their guests.

    One approach I might take is to just bring some old tech gear in. I have a 2008 laptop that's a dog but it works. I also have an old phone that I could bring with me. I'm still working out the logistics of getting to the hospital right now. I might get a ride to my mother's place the night before and stay overnight there and then take the train in. It's a bit hard to plan without a surgery time.

    I can set up a VPN to my office for security but it seems like you have set up end-to-end security outside the WiFi system which sounds cool.

  • lizard44
    lizard44 Member Posts: 409 Member
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    Personal belongings

    Mike, you mentioned riding in on the train.  Is there someone who could stay with you  and hang onto your  belongings until you get in a room after surgery? We did the same as Kim- my husband brought my stuff in  from the car once I got to a room and that worked  well for us.

    Grace/lizard44

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
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    lizard44 said:

    Personal belongings

    Mike, you mentioned riding in on the train.  Is there someone who could stay with you  and hang onto your  belongings until you get in a room after surgery? We did the same as Kim- my husband brought my stuff in  from the car once I got to a room and that worked  well for us.

    Grace/lizard44

    Not sure if anyone can stay

    Not sure if anyone can stay with me but I could have someone drop stuff off the next day. I should find out more on pre-op day as I think that they do some pre-admittance stuff like asking if I want a private room. I imagine that I could ask about things like lockers and storage. I don't like to ask others for a lot of help if it inconveniences them and Boston is an inconvenience for everyone. I'm sure that I'll be able to work something out though and I hope to find more information at the pre-op.

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,742 Member
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    Mikenh said:

    Not sure if anyone can stay

    Not sure if anyone can stay with me but I could have someone drop stuff off the next day. I should find out more on pre-op day as I think that they do some pre-admittance stuff like asking if I want a private room. I imagine that I could ask about things like lockers and storage. I don't like to ask others for a lot of help if it inconveniences them and Boston is an inconvenience for everyone. I'm sure that I'll be able to work something out though and I hope to find more information at the pre-op.

    Inventory

    My hospital always did an inventory of my things.  They even listed my watch and my Fitbit, although gave that to my husband.  My hospital is very good about personal items.  That would be great if you can get someone to drop your personals off the next day.  Just have it ready in a "carry on" luggage and have them bring it to you.  The first day you might not feel like getting to your lap top, but the second day is going to drive you batty if you are used to FB or e-mail.  Hoping all goes well.

    Kim

  • lizard44
    lizard44 Member Posts: 409 Member
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    Mike, just thought of something

    I bought an extra long cord for my charger before I went in. It came in very handy since there were no outlets within a few feet of the bed. 

    Grace/ lizard44:

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
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    lizard44 said:

    Mike, just thought of something

    I bought an extra long cord for my charger before I went in. It came in very handy since there were no outlets within a few feet of the bed. 

    Grace/ lizard44:

    I have a four-port 40 Watt

    I have a four-port 40 Watt charger which I may bring with me. It charges things pretty fast and has a cord with it so the cord + the USB cords (I have a few six-foot cords) should work. We use it as a family charger on trips. I do plan to make a list of the things that I will bring with me to the surgery and then stuff that I'll get brought to me afterwards.

    On another note, a lady in another forum that went through this told me that she didn't take any prescription painkillers after surgery ( just OTC stuff), and was working on her laptop the next day. She's the CEO of a tech company so I guess she's very busy. The vast majority seem to report a lot of pain so she's an outlier but at least it tells me that it's possible to go without the PPKs.

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
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    Pain killers

    Mike, I only had pain killers (morphine drip) the day of surgery and the following morning. I was able to do fine without them afterwards. I think I hit the morphine switch only three times. 

    If you want to conserve, then hit the switch abuot 15 minutes before you intend to get out of bed. Getting out of bed those first few days is painful but necessary. The sooner you walk, the sooner you poop the sooner you get out of hospital. 

    Tru

  • Mikenh
    Mikenh Member Posts: 777
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    Trubrit said:

    Pain killers

    Mike, I only had pain killers (morphine drip) the day of surgery and the following morning. I was able to do fine without them afterwards. I think I hit the morphine switch only three times. 

    If you want to conserve, then hit the switch abuot 15 minutes before you intend to get out of bed. Getting out of bed those first few days is painful but necessary. The sooner you walk, the sooner you poop the sooner you get out of hospital. 

    Tru

    Thanks. I'm essentially doing

    Thanks. I'm essentially doing bootcamp this week and as much of next week as I can tolerate. I will be trying to take it light on painkillers.

  • Cindy225
    Cindy225 Member Posts: 172 Member
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    Pain Killers

    I did the same thing as Tru.  Hallucinated the first night on strong meds and that was the end of that.  Did use the big belly lidocaine patches and took 600 MG Ibuprofen while in the hospital for three days and about a week at home. What I did not like was having to self-inject the daily Lovenox shots for 30 days to prevent blood clots.  My thighs were so black and blue.  Honestly, I was not interested in my laptop, iphone or kindle in the hospital. I just vegged and walked my IV and catheter through the hallways. That said, I really connected with my roommate and we've become friends outside the hospital.  That's been a nice outcome. :-)

    Cindy

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
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    Cindy225 said:

    Pain Killers

    I did the same thing as Tru.  Hallucinated the first night on strong meds and that was the end of that.  Did use the big belly lidocaine patches and took 600 MG Ibuprofen while in the hospital for three days and about a week at home. What I did not like was having to self-inject the daily Lovenox shots for 30 days to prevent blood clots.  My thighs were so black and blue.  Honestly, I was not interested in my laptop, iphone or kindle in the hospital. I just vegged and walked my IV and catheter through the hallways. That said, I really connected with my roommate and we've become friends outside the hospital.  That's been a nice outcome. :-)

    Cindy

    Meeting others

    Hospitals are a great place to meet other people, and visit. By visitnig with other patients, you get to forget about yourself for a while, and see that your lot is not half so bad. 

    When I was in hospital, I visited with a little lady, she weighed 78 and was dropping down as the days passed. What she was going through was terrible, and made me feel so grateful that I only had Cancer. 

    Plus, you have a captive audience when they can't get out of bed image.

    Tru

  • Cindy225
    Cindy225 Member Posts: 172 Member
    edited October 2017 #20
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    Meeting Others

    Tru you are so right!  When I was back in the hospital for my ileostomy reversal my roommate was so scared and frightened about her surgery, recovery and the hospital experience that I spent my time comforting and encouraging her for the 4 days we were together.  I left before she did and instead of taking family and friends flowers and balloons home I moved them to her side of the room to brighten her remaining hospital stay. We hugged...     

  • airborne72
    airborne72 Member Posts: 301 Member
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    The Bucket List

    If you recall, this very scenario was the event that initiated the theme of this movie, plus so much more.  On the other hand, if you have not watched it then go for it.  It will make you cry.  At least, it did me.

    Another subject: so many of you have mentioning hospital roommates.  Maybe I am spoiled or perhaps I live in a hospital dense location, but in the past 8 years I have undergone major surgery in 3 different hospitals and I was always in a private room.  To my recall, none of those facilities had anything but private rooms.  One was a prestigious research/educational hospital, another was a for-profit hospital and the last one was a parochial hospital.

    I have been blessed with excellent insurance coverage (twenty years in the military eventually paid off) but that was not a factor, as far as I know.  No one ever asked if I wanted a private room.

    Looking back on it I can see the definite advantage of "mutual support and bonding" that could occur.  On the other hand, the room would probably enjoy twice the number of visits by medical staff = even more interrupted sleep.

    Jim