Info help please

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daisybud
daisybud Member Posts: 541 Member

Daughter had colonoscopy today for what we thought would be for colitis.  instead had 2  medium sized sessile polyps in upper colon  she's 32. Dr said they were pre cancer.  

Don't have path report yet but looking for guidance in chances that it's all ready cancer.. also told her she will need another colonoscopy in one year  needless to say she very upset as am I.

Anyone have this type of polyp  what's the risk? any suggestions would be welcomed.

I am a member on the kidney cancer board 

Kim 

 

 

Comments

  • John23
    John23 Member Posts: 2,122 Member
    edited November 2016 #2
    Options
    Polyp plop

    "Pre-cancer".... Every cell in the body could be "pre-cancer". Wait until the biopsy/path report, then see what's what.

    Polyps grow anyplace. Did you ever have a small dangling "thing" grow out of someplace on your body? It falls off, usually, all by itself.

    I keep typing this out; I should make a macro:

    Any dead, dying, or severely damaged cell that can no longer "hear" the body's instructions can begin a "new life" using the very basic fermentation process if not taken out by the immune system (T cells). Once it begins using the fermentation process, it just grows aimlessly and totally unrestricted, like mold inside a damp wall. It has no brain, and I doubt any intention of killing it's host; it just survives and grows like a blade of grass in the middle of a throughway.

    The body continually produces severely damaged cells in it's effort to get rid of the "old cells" for new growth, repair, etc. To "kill" anything, it has to be damaged beyond it's ability to survive. External life-damaging chemicals, radiation, etc, etc, can add to the "problem", but it should be fully understood that it isn't the damaged cells or what's damaging them, it's the immune system's neglect to remove them that is the actual problem.

    Simple enough? It really is that simple. All cancer cells begin and survive by the same means. How to kill it? That's easy! The difficult part isn't what to use to kill it, it's how to target any individual cell. Present technology does not have a way to isolate a single cancer cell out of the gazillion cells in the body. If the cell grows large enough to be identified (tumor), then it may be possible to use Radio Frequency Ablation, surgery, or direct chemical injection into the tumor. The idea of using chemicals or radiation (both carcinogenic) is a rough row to hoe, since the entire body must fight the rigors or treatment, rather than use the energy to maintain decent health.

    Some will question "why" would it be important to have a healthy immune system if it isn't doing it's job to identify a rogue cell..... The damage a cancer cell can do by displacing the area needed for good cells to survive can take it's toll on one's overall health. The ability for the immune system to fight all the other problems that can be associated with the damage will suffer. The white cell count runs higher in those of us with cancer. That's an indication the immune system is doing what it can to repair damage.

    If and when a cancer tumor dies, it gives off an abundance of chemicals (note a higher CEA spike after treatment). The immune system can (and often does) become sensitized to the chemicals, and if strong enough, will go after anything expelling those same "foreign" chemicals!

    IF...(big if).... that occurs, you may finally be immune to cancer growth, like the majority of people are!

    That's the basic principle of "immunotherapy". Sensitize the immune system to the chemicals given off by a cancer cell.

    Please note: A cancer cell uses glucose for food and expels lactic acid. The liver converts lactic acid into glucose. Since the cancer cell can not hear the body's instructions and lives unrestricted, it can and will use more glucose than normal cells. Limiting the intake of glucose (sugar) will starve your good cells first, making the immune system weak. The cancer will still steal the glucose, since it is unrestricted.

    A polyp is a polyp. Calling it "pre-cancer" is a stretch. It's an abnormal growth, more often it is totally benign than anything serious. Can it become a problem? Sure, and it's best to have it removed rather than leave it be... Any continual irritation, polyp or metal bra supports, can be a contributing factor if one's immune system isn't identifying and removing damaged cells.

    Wait for that path report. Get the polyps removed (if they haven't been already), and try to relax.

    FWIW, I was diagnosed as CC stage 4 2006. I presently (since 11/2015) have a recurrence. Life goes on. I never did chemo or rad.... read my bio and blog, if interested.

    Think "GOOD HEALTH", and be well!

    My best to you and your daughter.

    John

     

  • kmygil
    kmygil Member Posts: 876 Member
    edited November 2016 #3
    Options
    John23 said:

    Polyp plop

    "Pre-cancer".... Every cell in the body could be "pre-cancer". Wait until the biopsy/path report, then see what's what.

    Polyps grow anyplace. Did you ever have a small dangling "thing" grow out of someplace on your body? It falls off, usually, all by itself.

    I keep typing this out; I should make a macro:

    Any dead, dying, or severely damaged cell that can no longer "hear" the body's instructions can begin a "new life" using the very basic fermentation process if not taken out by the immune system (T cells). Once it begins using the fermentation process, it just grows aimlessly and totally unrestricted, like mold inside a damp wall. It has no brain, and I doubt any intention of killing it's host; it just survives and grows like a blade of grass in the middle of a throughway.

    The body continually produces severely damaged cells in it's effort to get rid of the "old cells" for new growth, repair, etc. To "kill" anything, it has to be damaged beyond it's ability to survive. External life-damaging chemicals, radiation, etc, etc, can add to the "problem", but it should be fully understood that it isn't the damaged cells or what's damaging them, it's the immune system's neglect to remove them that is the actual problem.

    Simple enough? It really is that simple. All cancer cells begin and survive by the same means. How to kill it? That's easy! The difficult part isn't what to use to kill it, it's how to target any individual cell. Present technology does not have a way to isolate a single cancer cell out of the gazillion cells in the body. If the cell grows large enough to be identified (tumor), then it may be possible to use Radio Frequency Ablation, surgery, or direct chemical injection into the tumor. The idea of using chemicals or radiation (both carcinogenic) is a rough row to hoe, since the entire body must fight the rigors or treatment, rather than use the energy to maintain decent health.

    Some will question "why" would it be important to have a healthy immune system if it isn't doing it's job to identify a rogue cell..... The damage a cancer cell can do by displacing the area needed for good cells to survive can take it's toll on one's overall health. The ability for the immune system to fight all the other problems that can be associated with the damage will suffer. The white cell count runs higher in those of us with cancer. That's an indication the immune system is doing what it can to repair damage.

    If and when a cancer tumor dies, it gives off an abundance of chemicals (note a higher CEA spike after treatment). The immune system can (and often does) become sensitized to the chemicals, and if strong enough, will go after anything expelling those same "foreign" chemicals!

    IF...(big if).... that occurs, you may finally be immune to cancer growth, like the majority of people are!

    That's the basic principle of "immunotherapy". Sensitize the immune system to the chemicals given off by a cancer cell.

    Please note: A cancer cell uses glucose for food and expels lactic acid. The liver converts lactic acid into glucose. Since the cancer cell can not hear the body's instructions and lives unrestricted, it can and will use more glucose than normal cells. Limiting the intake of glucose (sugar) will starve your good cells first, making the immune system weak. The cancer will still steal the glucose, since it is unrestricted.

    A polyp is a polyp. Calling it "pre-cancer" is a stretch. It's an abnormal growth, more often it is totally benign than anything serious. Can it become a problem? Sure, and it's best to have it removed rather than leave it be... Any continual irritation, polyp or metal bra supports, can be a contributing factor if one's immune system isn't identifying and removing damaged cells.

    Wait for that path report. Get the polyps removed (if they haven't been already), and try to relax.

    FWIW, I was diagnosed as CC stage 4 2006. I presently (since 11/2015) have a recurrence. Life goes on. I never did chemo or rad.... read my bio and blog, if interested.

    Think "GOOD HEALTH", and be well!

    My best to you and your daughter.

    John

     

    Best answer ever, John

    Thanks for that clear and easily understood answer, John.  I am 10 and 9 years NED for two different primary cancers, and of all the doctor visits, lab visits, imaging visits, chemo treatments, and personal research, I have never heard as excellent an explanation.  You rock!

    Kirsten

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478 Member
    edited November 2016 #4
    Options
    John, an excellent answer as

    John, an excellent answer as usual. May I have your permission to steal it from you and share it with some people? I will not take credit for it. I'm going to a cancer retreat in two days and would love to have this printed out to bring with me. I'd also like to use it as a defense against the know it alls that give me foolish advice because they know all about cancer and want to inform me.

    I hope you're okay with that.

    Jan

  • John23
    John23 Member Posts: 2,122 Member
    Options
    Copyright (or wrong?)

    Haha....

    All that info is available at nearly all Physician's "Journals", although you have to lie and register as a physician at some... Ya'know, Like "facebook", etc?

    Most individuals have no idea what a cancer cell really is, how it starts or manages to survive. And the industry does what it can to make it more complicated than it is. The only problem and major hurdle in finding a "cure", is figuring out a way to target a single cancer cell without damaging others. That is only possible by using our own immune system, but there are billions upon billions out there waiting to be raked in by trying any other method that can be thought of. Some "new" treatments "extend life"... The fine print will disclose the terms of the extension, usually measured in weeks (2.3 months).

    There are many ways to do battle and some work better than others. But then..... doesn't that hold true for ALL the medicine they presently offer? No gaurantee, unless it's if you'll suffer side effects from treatment.

    Listen to your gifted survival instinct, every living thing has it; pay attention to it. If something doesn't "feel right" or sound right, or sounds like it might not be good for -YOU-, then walk away. Trust thyself.

    Be well (everyone!)

    John

     

  • beaumontdave
    beaumontdave Member Posts: 1,280 Member
    Options
    John23 said:

    Copyright (or wrong?)

    Haha....

    All that info is available at nearly all Physician's "Journals", although you have to lie and register as a physician at some... Ya'know, Like "facebook", etc?

    Most individuals have no idea what a cancer cell really is, how it starts or manages to survive. And the industry does what it can to make it more complicated than it is. The only problem and major hurdle in finding a "cure", is figuring out a way to target a single cancer cell without damaging others. That is only possible by using our own immune system, but there are billions upon billions out there waiting to be raked in by trying any other method that can be thought of. Some "new" treatments "extend life"... The fine print will disclose the terms of the extension, usually measured in weeks (2.3 months).

    There are many ways to do battle and some work better than others. But then..... doesn't that hold true for ALL the medicine they presently offer? No gaurantee, unless it's if you'll suffer side effects from treatment.

    Listen to your gifted survival instinct, every living thing has it; pay attention to it. If something doesn't "feel right" or sound right, or sounds like it might not be good for -YOU-, then walk away. Trust thyself.

    Be well (everyone!)

    John

     

    It is a nice cancer primer

    It is a nice cancer primer John, that should be on a sheet the doctor hands out on day one, so folks are grounded when all the magic cures start being thrown their way.................................Dave

  • Brajesh
    Brajesh Member Posts: 10
    edited December 2016 #7
    Options
    John23 said:

    Polyp plop

    "Pre-cancer".... Every cell in the body could be "pre-cancer". Wait until the biopsy/path report, then see what's what.

    Polyps grow anyplace. Did you ever have a small dangling "thing" grow out of someplace on your body? It falls off, usually, all by itself.

    I keep typing this out; I should make a macro:

    Any dead, dying, or severely damaged cell that can no longer "hear" the body's instructions can begin a "new life" using the very basic fermentation process if not taken out by the immune system (T cells). Once it begins using the fermentation process, it just grows aimlessly and totally unrestricted, like mold inside a damp wall. It has no brain, and I doubt any intention of killing it's host; it just survives and grows like a blade of grass in the middle of a throughway.

    The body continually produces severely damaged cells in it's effort to get rid of the "old cells" for new growth, repair, etc. To "kill" anything, it has to be damaged beyond it's ability to survive. External life-damaging chemicals, radiation, etc, etc, can add to the "problem", but it should be fully understood that it isn't the damaged cells or what's damaging them, it's the immune system's neglect to remove them that is the actual problem.

    Simple enough? It really is that simple. All cancer cells begin and survive by the same means. How to kill it? That's easy! The difficult part isn't what to use to kill it, it's how to target any individual cell. Present technology does not have a way to isolate a single cancer cell out of the gazillion cells in the body. If the cell grows large enough to be identified (tumor), then it may be possible to use Radio Frequency Ablation, surgery, or direct chemical injection into the tumor. The idea of using chemicals or radiation (both carcinogenic) is a rough row to hoe, since the entire body must fight the rigors or treatment, rather than use the energy to maintain decent health.

    Some will question "why" would it be important to have a healthy immune system if it isn't doing it's job to identify a rogue cell..... The damage a cancer cell can do by displacing the area needed for good cells to survive can take it's toll on one's overall health. The ability for the immune system to fight all the other problems that can be associated with the damage will suffer. The white cell count runs higher in those of us with cancer. That's an indication the immune system is doing what it can to repair damage.

    If and when a cancer tumor dies, it gives off an abundance of chemicals (note a higher CEA spike after treatment). The immune system can (and often does) become sensitized to the chemicals, and if strong enough, will go after anything expelling those same "foreign" chemicals!

    IF...(big if).... that occurs, you may finally be immune to cancer growth, like the majority of people are!

    That's the basic principle of "immunotherapy". Sensitize the immune system to the chemicals given off by a cancer cell.

    Please note: A cancer cell uses glucose for food and expels lactic acid. The liver converts lactic acid into glucose. Since the cancer cell can not hear the body's instructions and lives unrestricted, it can and will use more glucose than normal cells. Limiting the intake of glucose (sugar) will starve your good cells first, making the immune system weak. The cancer will still steal the glucose, since it is unrestricted.

    A polyp is a polyp. Calling it "pre-cancer" is a stretch. It's an abnormal growth, more often it is totally benign than anything serious. Can it become a problem? Sure, and it's best to have it removed rather than leave it be... Any continual irritation, polyp or metal bra supports, can be a contributing factor if one's immune system isn't identifying and removing damaged cells.

    Wait for that path report. Get the polyps removed (if they haven't been already), and try to relax.

    FWIW, I was diagnosed as CC stage 4 2006. I presently (since 11/2015) have a recurrence. Life goes on. I never did chemo or rad.... read my bio and blog, if interested.

    Think "GOOD HEALTH", and be well!

    My best to you and your daughter.

    John

     

    Your bio and blog

    John,

    I would like to know your story.  

    My father just had a colon resection surgery 2 weeks ago and it was at stage 2a.  The tumor was the size of a baseball so the oncogist recommends 6 sessions of chemo (Otherwise he said they don't recommend chemo at stage 2a).  My dad is keenly searching for alternatives to chemo.

    Could you share your bio and blog?

     

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,800 Member
    Options
    Brajesh said:

    Your bio and blog

    John,

    I would like to know your story.  

    My father just had a colon resection surgery 2 weeks ago and it was at stage 2a.  The tumor was the size of a baseball so the oncogist recommends 6 sessions of chemo (Otherwise he said they don't recommend chemo at stage 2a).  My dad is keenly searching for alternatives to chemo.

    Could you share your bio and blog?

     

    John's bio & Blog

    If you click on John's name, under his cartoon picture, it will take you to his profile.  Then you can access his blog from there by clicking on the Blog button at the top left (and down a bit) of the page, and then his Read More under each entry. 

    A great read..

    TRU

  • Brajesh
    Brajesh Member Posts: 10
    Options
    Trubrit said:

    John's bio & Blog

    If you click on John's name, under his cartoon picture, it will take you to his profile.  Then you can access his blog from there by clicking on the Blog button at the top left (and down a bit) of the page, and then his Read More under each entry. 

    A great read..

    TRU

    Got it!  Thanks Trubit

    Got it!  Thanks Trubit