Running A Fever

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Have had only 2 of my weekly Cisplatin and my bloodwork was fantastic last week. Now suddenly I'm running a fever. It hit 100.5 and I didn't realize I wasnt supposed to take anything to get it down. Called doc. Of course I haven't heard back yet. How concerned should I be over this fever?

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  • Skiffin16
    Skiffin16 Member Posts: 8,305 Member
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    Tylenol
    Who said not to take anything to get it down.....

    When I started having high fevers (102.7) from the Amifostine we found out later. But the first night I had a high fever, we called the emergency number and they told us to take Tylenol.

    Verified the next morning with my regular and she confirmed...

    We were kind of confused as they put so much stress on 100.5 and not to wait on taking any action and calling them.

    You get a 102.7 fever, and they just advised to take Tylenol....

    Of course I'm not a medical professional, and you should do as advised...

    But check with your regular treatment MD's to get their reccomendations...

    Also, I know your eating is OK, LOL...but make sure you stay plenty hydrated also.

    Best,
    John
  • yensid683
    yensid683 Member Posts: 349
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    running a fever
    My oncologist takes a narrow line on fever. Anything over 100.5 and they want you to call. My experience with cisplatin had me neutropenic and in trouble with an infection. I had high dose induction chemo with TFP, three days after release I was at the out patient infusion center and they took my temp - 99.5, they checked it again about 30 minutes later and it was 101, so I wound up readmitted and on iv antibiotics.

    I was talking with my oc about it and he advised that they look at chemo patients much like infants, in that our immune systems are susceptible to infections that most individuals would shake off an not even know they had. Net result, my wife has become cautious on my temp.

    A few weeks ago, she kissed my forehead at bedtime and discovered (with that most sensitive of thermometers) that I was warm. She took my temp, 100.8 so she called the doctors office and spoke with the answering service. Not a minute later the on call doctor was on the phone with instructions to head to the emergency room. He had called ahead and I was spared the usual waiting issues and even had my own room, a battery of tests, blood draws, x rays etc and a short course of iv anti biotics, and my temp was back into normal limits.

    I would DEFINITELY call your Oncologist, a temp is NEVER 'normal' or something you should self medicate, especially if you're being treated with cisplatin.
  • tuffenuff
    tuffenuff Member Posts: 277
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    Skiffin16 said:

    Tylenol
    Who said not to take anything to get it down.....

    When I started having high fevers (102.7) from the Amifostine we found out later. But the first night I had a high fever, we called the emergency number and they told us to take Tylenol.

    Verified the next morning with my regular and she confirmed...

    We were kind of confused as they put so much stress on 100.5 and not to wait on taking any action and calling them.

    You get a 102.7 fever, and they just advised to take Tylenol....

    Of course I'm not a medical professional, and you should do as advised...

    But check with your regular treatment MD's to get their reccomendations...

    Also, I know your eating is OK, LOL...but make sure you stay plenty hydrated also.

    Best,
    John

    I was referring to my
    I was referring to my "chemotherapy and you" booklet that said don't take anything but the doc on call looked at my bloodwork and said to go ahead and take something to control it and come in today.
  • tuffenuff
    tuffenuff Member Posts: 277
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    yensid683 said:

    running a fever
    My oncologist takes a narrow line on fever. Anything over 100.5 and they want you to call. My experience with cisplatin had me neutropenic and in trouble with an infection. I had high dose induction chemo with TFP, three days after release I was at the out patient infusion center and they took my temp - 99.5, they checked it again about 30 minutes later and it was 101, so I wound up readmitted and on iv antibiotics.

    I was talking with my oc about it and he advised that they look at chemo patients much like infants, in that our immune systems are susceptible to infections that most individuals would shake off an not even know they had. Net result, my wife has become cautious on my temp.

    A few weeks ago, she kissed my forehead at bedtime and discovered (with that most sensitive of thermometers) that I was warm. She took my temp, 100.8 so she called the doctors office and spoke with the answering service. Not a minute later the on call doctor was on the phone with instructions to head to the emergency room. He had called ahead and I was spared the usual waiting issues and even had my own room, a battery of tests, blood draws, x rays etc and a short course of iv anti biotics, and my temp was back into normal limits.

    I would DEFINITELY call your Oncologist, a temp is NEVER 'normal' or something you should self medicate, especially if you're being treated with cisplatin.

    Here's to hoping I don't get
    Here's to hoping I don't get admitted. I mean what worse place to be with a compromised immune system than a hospital?? A good friend of mine is battling a healthcare acquired infection right now. Pretty scary.
  • Skiffin16
    Skiffin16 Member Posts: 8,305 Member
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    yensid683 said:

    running a fever
    My oncologist takes a narrow line on fever. Anything over 100.5 and they want you to call. My experience with cisplatin had me neutropenic and in trouble with an infection. I had high dose induction chemo with TFP, three days after release I was at the out patient infusion center and they took my temp - 99.5, they checked it again about 30 minutes later and it was 101, so I wound up readmitted and on iv antibiotics.

    I was talking with my oc about it and he advised that they look at chemo patients much like infants, in that our immune systems are susceptible to infections that most individuals would shake off an not even know they had. Net result, my wife has become cautious on my temp.

    A few weeks ago, she kissed my forehead at bedtime and discovered (with that most sensitive of thermometers) that I was warm. She took my temp, 100.8 so she called the doctors office and spoke with the answering service. Not a minute later the on call doctor was on the phone with instructions to head to the emergency room. He had called ahead and I was spared the usual waiting issues and even had my own room, a battery of tests, blood draws, x rays etc and a short course of iv anti biotics, and my temp was back into normal limits.

    I would DEFINITELY call your Oncologist, a temp is NEVER 'normal' or something you should self medicate, especially if you're being treated with cisplatin.

    Just Sayin
    I too had high doses of Cisplatin, Taxotere and 5FU...(TPF).

    The scenario I described is how it went down in my case.

    You are correct concerning self medicating. But when told to do so by the professionals, that's what you do.

    All cases are not the same, and all fevers are not due to infection (though a lot are)... In my case it was a reaction to another medication.

    Like I mentioned as well, you should always call in, and check back with your treatment MD's first thing after.

    Best,
    John
  • NoDuck
    NoDuck Member Posts: 134
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    Skiffin16 said:

    Just Sayin
    I too had high doses of Cisplatin, Taxotere and 5FU...(TPF).

    The scenario I described is how it went down in my case.

    You are correct concerning self medicating. But when told to do so by the professionals, that's what you do.

    All cases are not the same, and all fevers are not due to infection (though a lot are)... In my case it was a reaction to another medication.

    Like I mentioned as well, you should always call in, and check back with your treatment MD's first thing after.

    Best,
    John

    Hydrate!
    We learned the hard way that when they say 2 liters of fluids per day, you better get close. Even water nauseated Hubby and in the days leading up to his second chemo dose (cisplatin 21 days apart) he had lots of nutrition and hydration problems, mostly caused by the yeast infection in his mouth. He kept spiking a fever around 99.2 every day then it got to 100.2. The docs said he was dehydrated (so did several of you on this board :)) They offered him IV fluids the day or two before chemo but he promised to drink more. His veins are hard to find and he didn't want to get stuck any more than he had to (no port because in theory he only had 3 infusions so only 3 sticks).

    When we got to chemo Thursday, they could not find a vein. The rule is a nurse gets two chances at finding a vein and then she has to pass you off to another nurse. Hubby went throu two nurses then finally the department head got a vein after wrapping his arm in a heating pad for an hour. Five sticks total. Then once they found the vein, he was so dehydrated they couldn't get enough blood out to do his bloodwork. So we ended up staying 6 hours Thursday and Hubby got 2 bags of fluid. We returned Friday, they drew the blood and then he finally got the second chemo dose.

    So, hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. I had a reluctant patient until that incident. Now he is a lot more proactive with his fluid intake.

    Deb
  • phrannie51
    phrannie51 Member Posts: 4,716
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    tuffenuff said:

    Here's to hoping I don't get
    Here's to hoping I don't get admitted. I mean what worse place to be with a compromised immune system than a hospital?? A good friend of mine is battling a healthcare acquired infection right now. Pretty scary.

    How is the fever today?
    Did they ever call you back? I didn't know that if you got one, you weren't supposed to take anything for it...I'd be so nervous of an infection sneaking up on me, I would have probably got way scared...and would have kept calling back.

    p
  • tuffenuff
    tuffenuff Member Posts: 277
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    I think I have an ear
    I think I have an ear infection. A few days ago I started having some ear pain when I swallow. I chalked it up to being a sore throat from radiation. Doc called me in some antibiotics. I go tomorrow for chemo and to be quite frank, I feel like a huge steaming pile of feces. I know I'm dehydrated and I know I'm not getting enough nutrition. What I don't know is how to force myself to fix it. I have been crying for two days and things aren't even bad yet. I'm starting to think I had some sort of food addiction because this MUST be what withdrawals feel like. The worst part is everyone around me keeps saying I'm the strongest woman they know. I gotta say I'm surely not feeling it at this point in time.

    I know im going to do this and I'm going to be fine. It just might involve a whole lot more crying than I thought.
  • phrannie51
    phrannie51 Member Posts: 4,716
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    tuffenuff said:

    I think I have an ear
    I think I have an ear infection. A few days ago I started having some ear pain when I swallow. I chalked it up to being a sore throat from radiation. Doc called me in some antibiotics. I go tomorrow for chemo and to be quite frank, I feel like a huge steaming pile of feces. I know I'm dehydrated and I know I'm not getting enough nutrition. What I don't know is how to force myself to fix it. I have been crying for two days and things aren't even bad yet. I'm starting to think I had some sort of food addiction because this MUST be what withdrawals feel like. The worst part is everyone around me keeps saying I'm the strongest woman they know. I gotta say I'm surely not feeling it at this point in time.

    I know im going to do this and I'm going to be fine. It just might involve a whole lot more crying than I thought.

    You ARE strong....
    this ear infection is another dish put on your plate and is probably wearing you down more than you realize. For me, when in doubt of needed nurtician and hydration...go to whole milk...it slides down, is soothing, feeds you and hydrates you...and helps a person sleep, too...I didn't drink milk for 40 years...and now I'm doing a gallon every 2 days...

    p
  • CivilMatt
    CivilMatt Member Posts: 4,723 Member
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    feel better
    Hi tuffenuff,

    Boy are you getting a rough start. It sounds like everyone is giving A Grade advice to you (doctors included). Since John gave you the Tylenol and Phrannie gave you a glass of milk, I thing I’ll just fluff your pillow and cover you up.

    To me it sounds like your body is adjusting to the new surroundings. I agree with your friends and family and think you are a strong person. You are in the big leagues now, I know it is scary and I know it hurts and I know each of us here support you 100%.

    Sleep tight and hydrate,

    Dr. Matt (kidding)
  • Kent Cass
    Kent Cass Member Posts: 1,898 Member
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    CivilMatt said:

    feel better
    Hi tuffenuff,

    Boy are you getting a rough start. It sounds like everyone is giving A Grade advice to you (doctors included). Since John gave you the Tylenol and Phrannie gave you a glass of milk, I thing I’ll just fluff your pillow and cover you up.

    To me it sounds like your body is adjusting to the new surroundings. I agree with your friends and family and think you are a strong person. You are in the big leagues now, I know it is scary and I know it hurts and I know each of us here support you 100%.

    Sleep tight and hydrate,

    Dr. Matt (kidding)

    Hydrate is-
    Right. Very important.

    I was told by an ER Dr and Onco Nurse that 101* is the number to watch for. Said that if a fever gets to 101* and stays there for half a day- get thee to an ER. Was told that when it's under 101* it's just the body struggling with whatever's going-on, and that the prolonged-101* means the body is losing that battle. An ear infection is more specific, though, and your Drs should be able to get that under control.

    Like Matt said, tuffenuff, this is the big leagues. We've all been there and made it thru okay. And remember- lotta C people have endured a lot more than you or I, and they also made it thru. Keep your Drs in the Loop with how you're really doing, physically and mentally- and keep it in the Positive moving forward. You are gonna survive this thing, tuffenuff, and be all right. It's a new game every day during tx, tuffenuff, and Come What May, girl- doesn't really matter. All that really matters is that you're gonna survive this thing, and life post-tx will be entirely acceptable. And, yes, there's another new game, today, tuffenuff, and you're playing. What's winning the game like? A 2nd chance at life. You will get there, just as we all have-

    Believe

    kcass
  • yensid683
    yensid683 Member Posts: 349
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    tuffenuff said:

    I think I have an ear
    I think I have an ear infection. A few days ago I started having some ear pain when I swallow. I chalked it up to being a sore throat from radiation. Doc called me in some antibiotics. I go tomorrow for chemo and to be quite frank, I feel like a huge steaming pile of feces. I know I'm dehydrated and I know I'm not getting enough nutrition. What I don't know is how to force myself to fix it. I have been crying for two days and things aren't even bad yet. I'm starting to think I had some sort of food addiction because this MUST be what withdrawals feel like. The worst part is everyone around me keeps saying I'm the strongest woman they know. I gotta say I'm surely not feeling it at this point in time.

    I know im going to do this and I'm going to be fine. It just might involve a whole lot more crying than I thought.

    you're doing fine
    But it sure doesn't feel like it. I had similar issues after my second admit, needing to be hydrated but not able to stand the taste of anything. Even the tap water tasted like a muddy rusty pipe, but I took the position that if I want to get well, I will have to force myself. Where I used to enjoy food, savor a taste, sip my drink I became someone who's table manners were radically changed, slamming down food, chugging the whole glass so that
    A) I got something in, and B) hydrated. I have an infusion port and it is no problem to get stuck, but running to the outpatient infusion center is a pain.

    I am 5 weeks into my rads and have troubles with eating, no sense of taste, little to no saliva and a throat that feels like a blow torch gave it a thorough going over (prescription pain meds are a god send). I am also lucky enough to have a PEG tube so I get most of my nutrition through it. You may want to speak with your doctor about getting one. It can be cumbersome, it does get in the way at times, but I like that my weight is steady (chemo and hospital food are so much more effective than Jenny Craig for weight loss).

    I miss food as well, and I relate to the withdrawal analogy, but I intend to be back to it. I smell the wonderful things my wife cooks and they smell so good (they didn't with TPF) so I'm going to get it done!

    A trite saying 'it is always darkest before the dawn'; Hang in there, work with your medical team, ask questions and participate with the boards, they've helped me keep in the fight, even when I felt like chucking it all, asking for palliative care, the best pain meds and letting nature take its course. It is worth the fight!