Cyst grew, so take out the ovary?

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PJ2012
PJ2012 Member Posts: 3
Hi. I could use some advise. I am post-menopausal, in very good health, but I have three cysts in my right ovary, one grew from one ultrasound to the next six months later. Oncologist GYN said take the ovary out six months ago, but I wanted to wait. The GYN gave me another blood test and then said he agreed, dont take it out.

They will not just take out the cyst, because a post-menopausal woman's doesn't need the ovary.

I have no symptoms. The CA-125 blood test result is 11. The radiologist and both doctors say it doesn't look like cancer. Oncologist GYN says it still could be cancer and occurs in 1 out of 10 cases. He is treating women with cancer, so his medical viewpoint is very real! However, complications with a laparoscopic oophorectomy are 15%, according to an NIH doctor. The concern is, post-menopausal women shouldn't produce cysts, and it is more suspicious since it grew.. Size: went from 3.5x3.3x3.2 cm to 4.3x4.1x4.0 cm.

So, it is most likely not cancer, but to be on the safe side, remove the ovary. Anyone here who has had this experience and can provide guidance, I would appreciate the input.

Comments

  • carolenk
    carolenk Member Posts: 907 Member
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    You kind of answered your
    You kind of answered your own question already. It's not normal for a post-menopausal woman to have cysts.
  • cjoy55
    cjoy55 Member Posts: 11
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    Get them taken out!
    Why take the risk? This disease is horrible. I am going to get tested for the brc1 ?? Gene and if positive I will have mine removed just as a preventative measure.
  • longtermsurvivor
    longtermsurvivor Member Posts: 1,842 Member
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    Laparoscopicc oophorectomy
    is typically a piece of cake operation. I don't know how that 15% compication rate was derived, but it is waaaayyyyyy overstated. In experienced hands, the complication rate is very much lower than that. And yes, you cannot rely on Ca125 and ultrasound evidence to conclude a cyst is benign. If the cyst were stable in size, there could be an argument to leave it alone, but it has been demonstrated to be enlarging.

    Also, if it is a mucinous cyst and you happen to rupture it you have some risk for the dreaded ccomplication of myxoma peritoneii. Others have posted on this site who have that particular lethal complication, and you don't want it.

    There is no academic argument for you to not get this taken care of.

    Best wishes
  • PJ2012
    PJ2012 Member Posts: 3
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    Laparoscopicc oophorectomy
    is typically a piece of cake operation. I don't know how that 15% compication rate was derived, but it is waaaayyyyyy overstated. In experienced hands, the complication rate is very much lower than that. And yes, you cannot rely on Ca125 and ultrasound evidence to conclude a cyst is benign. If the cyst were stable in size, there could be an argument to leave it alone, but it has been demonstrated to be enlarging.

    Also, if it is a mucinous cyst and you happen to rupture it you have some risk for the dreaded ccomplication of myxoma peritoneii. Others have posted on this site who have that particular lethal complication, and you don't want it.

    There is no academic argument for you to not get this taken care of.

    Best wishes

    Thanks
    Thank you for the comments. I will look up myxoma peritoneli, as I had not heard the term. The doctor said it is unlikely it will rupture. I don't like taking it out if it is not cancer, but guess there is no way to know. Would still love to hear from women who have had similar condition.
  • Tethys41
    Tethys41 Member Posts: 1,382 Member
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    PJ2012 said:

    Thanks
    Thank you for the comments. I will look up myxoma peritoneli, as I had not heard the term. The doctor said it is unlikely it will rupture. I don't like taking it out if it is not cancer, but guess there is no way to know. Would still love to hear from women who have had similar condition.

    Similar condition
    I appreciate your desire to obtain advice to help you with your current situation. But realize that the vast majority of us here have had our ovaries removed, not due to any choice, but because our diagnoses required it. If any of us had anything similar to you before we developed cancer, and I had an opportunity 10 years before diagnosis to have both ovaries removed, we certainly regret not getting rid of those dreaded organs while we could, before being slammed with this disease. I hope you find advice that helps with your decision, but most of us here would say, get those suckers yanked before they have a chance to kill you.
  • PJ2012
    PJ2012 Member Posts: 3
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    Tethys41 said:

    Similar condition
    I appreciate your desire to obtain advice to help you with your current situation. But realize that the vast majority of us here have had our ovaries removed, not due to any choice, but because our diagnoses required it. If any of us had anything similar to you before we developed cancer, and I had an opportunity 10 years before diagnosis to have both ovaries removed, we certainly regret not getting rid of those dreaded organs while we could, before being slammed with this disease. I hope you find advice that helps with your decision, but most of us here would say, get those suckers yanked before they have a chance to kill you.

    Thanks
    Hi. Understand. Sorry you are going through this. I had many biopsies for breast lumps - all benign. I'm just tired of being cut, mending, and then being told it wasn't necessary. My Onc-GYN has the same experience with the effects of this cancer, which is why he says take it out.
    Take care.