depression

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Has anyone else felt like just not doing this? I have only had one chemo treatment- three weeks ago now because my white cell count is low. I just wanted to get on with it and count down the treatments, but now I feel like the agony is being prolonged. I feel so bad about everything. Not just myself, but for all the people suffering with this. It is so unjust. The young- who haven't had a chance to live, and the old who have given their all, just to end up with this suffering. My faith is challenged. Why? Other faithful have said this builds their faith and trust, I feel my waining away, little by little, day by day....like my body, my hair, my self worth and confidence.

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  • Tkitty
    Tkitty Member Posts: 56
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    Don't give up. Everything is
    Don't give up. Everything is tested while we are in treatment. I had good days and not so good days. I looked at my boys and decided to keep on keeping on. I want to see them grow and succeed. On my bad days, I visit here and get encouragement, listen to music or read a book to distract me from my downward thoughts. Keep the faith, this too shall pass. I keep thinking that as I keep blistering from the radiation treatment. Still have 6 to go but am currently on hold until my skin heals, which seems incredably slow. BUT, my skin is healing. It is hard to feel positive when you feel bad, but I believe positive thoughts is what keeps us strong. I'm sending some your way.....
    Toni :0)
  • skipper54
    skipper54 Member Posts: 936 Member
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    Tkitty said:

    Don't give up. Everything is
    Don't give up. Everything is tested while we are in treatment. I had good days and not so good days. I looked at my boys and decided to keep on keeping on. I want to see them grow and succeed. On my bad days, I visit here and get encouragement, listen to music or read a book to distract me from my downward thoughts. Keep the faith, this too shall pass. I keep thinking that as I keep blistering from the radiation treatment. Still have 6 to go but am currently on hold until my skin heals, which seems incredably slow. BUT, my skin is healing. It is hard to feel positive when you feel bad, but I believe positive thoughts is what keeps us strong. I'm sending some your way.....
    Toni :0)

    Sending prayers!
    A dear friend of mine has suffered with Crones Disease for YEARS. She had an intestinal transplant 6 years ago and is now having problems again. Whenever I get discouraged I look at her and remember her favorite saying - "If God brings you to it, He WILL bring you through it!" We all feel tested at times but you can do this. Try to focus on the positive. Hang in there and "fight like a girl"!.
  • LoveBabyJesus
    LoveBabyJesus Member Posts: 1,679 Member
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    Faith
    My favorite word, yet it's so complex in many ways. We're humans and sometimes we will feel down. It's OK. We will feel weak. It's OK too. What matters is to continue and to believe everything will have a great end result, no matter what you see, no matter how you feel and no matter what you hear. Difficult? It probably is depending on what challenges we're faced with. But that's the only way to test faith. Faith should be kept when things go wrong. Very important.

    Chemo is not pleasant. But you'll do it, like everyone else. And be OK at the end of the road.

    Here're things that helped with my count: for red cells, you eat beets, lentils, red and green peppers (make sure you wash everything well), beans, broccoli, lots of colorful foods. Here's a great book to get, if you can. It tells you what to eat and what not to eat during each chemo side effect (for breast cancer). It helped me a lot: http://www.amazon.com/Cancer-Fighting-Kitchen-Nourishing-Big-Flavor-Treatment/dp/1587613441

    Also, if you have a juicer, I recommend this book: http://www.amazon.com/Big-Book-Juices-Natural-Vitality/dp/1844839737/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316266815&sr=1-1 It explains what mixes to do for what: energy, immune system, etc..

    Good luck with everything. We're always here. And please don't give up. Keep your faith and believe.
  • lccollins
    lccollins Member Posts: 10
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    Faith
    My favorite word, yet it's so complex in many ways. We're humans and sometimes we will feel down. It's OK. We will feel weak. It's OK too. What matters is to continue and to believe everything will have a great end result, no matter what you see, no matter how you feel and no matter what you hear. Difficult? It probably is depending on what challenges we're faced with. But that's the only way to test faith. Faith should be kept when things go wrong. Very important.

    Chemo is not pleasant. But you'll do it, like everyone else. And be OK at the end of the road.

    Here're things that helped with my count: for red cells, you eat beets, lentils, red and green peppers (make sure you wash everything well), beans, broccoli, lots of colorful foods. Here's a great book to get, if you can. It tells you what to eat and what not to eat during each chemo side effect (for breast cancer). It helped me a lot: http://www.amazon.com/Cancer-Fighting-Kitchen-Nourishing-Big-Flavor-Treatment/dp/1587613441

    Also, if you have a juicer, I recommend this book: http://www.amazon.com/Big-Book-Juices-Natural-Vitality/dp/1844839737/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316266815&sr=1-1 It explains what mixes to do for what: energy, immune system, etc..

    Good luck with everything. We're always here. And please don't give up. Keep your faith and believe.

    Faith
    Thanks so much for your words. I don't feel worthy of them. I'm ashamed at my lack of faith and doubt.
    '
  • carkris
    carkris Member Posts: 4,553 Member
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    lccollins said:

    Faith
    Thanks so much for your words. I don't feel worthy of them. I'm ashamed at my lack of faith and doubt.
    '

    years ago i remember
    years ago i remember watching Billy Graham speak after the Oklahoma bombings. he said it is a mystery that we just will never understand. So I figured out that if this wise man who has studied this can say this then i dont have to strive. (this also happened after my first breast cancer diagnosis)
    I remember having a bad day and visiting work which is right next door to where I was being treated and wondering why me again? Then as almost a sign a little girl waiting for a heart transplant rounded the corner, and I thought "why her?" The most innocent.
    When faced now with things I dont like I say "it is what it is" and I pray the serenity prayer. I am trying to find my way into living the best possible life for me. (sometimes it feels like stumbling around in the dark) taking leaps of faith.
    I believe God works through awesome people, and that God will help me get through this. the scary part is giving in to his plan as it may not be what we want. However it will be what it will be so make the best of every day.
    I admire the people who trust so simply, it gives them peace, but am reminded every day that God made me the way I am so its ok. its all a process of working through this in your own unique way. If you didnt have faith you wouldnt question it.
    BTW you will get through this one day at a time until you come out the end . Sometimes you dont know how but you do. One day you will be supporting someone and saying i know how you feel and see where i am now in q good place. Remember this too shall pass.
  • SIROD
    SIROD Member Posts: 2,194 Member
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    Meds for Depression?
    Dear lccollins,

    There is nothing more tiresome than not being treated because your blood count is so low. I know it happened to me several times. There is nothing worse than being all prepared to go through something than have them cancel or postpone.

    Your at the end of your time in treatment. It can be a bit alarming knowing that it will be over and your on your own except for 3 month check ups. Perhaps asking your doctor for a little help with the depression might be in order.

    Best wishes to you,

    Doris
  • dbhadra
    dbhadra Member Posts: 344 Member
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    SIROD said:

    Meds for Depression?
    Dear lccollins,

    There is nothing more tiresome than not being treated because your blood count is so low. I know it happened to me several times. There is nothing worse than being all prepared to go through something than have them cancel or postpone.

    Your at the end of your time in treatment. It can be a bit alarming knowing that it will be over and your on your own except for 3 month check ups. Perhaps asking your doctor for a little help with the depression might be in order.

    Best wishes to you,

    Doris

    battling with cancer can
    be a test of faith for sure. It's hard to believe and keep walking forward not knowing what is coming next. Never beat yourself up for doubting, it's a natural and normal reactions. We are not saints! I have met so many wonderful woman battling BC, but it's very rare to meet ANYONE who can walk through all this with a smile and with perfect faith. I used to beat myself up by not having enough faith in God since I struggled and doubted and got super depressed and anxious. Now I view it as the natural, human process of finding the road to acceptance.

    One day at a time you will get through the chemo and look back and it will be behind you.

    In the meanwhile, if you show signs of clinical depression, there are many good medications out there that can help. I had a clinical depression this summer after surgery and I started on Effexor about 2 months ago. I am feeling better today and was able to go through my current chemo and radiation treatment.

    Wishing you the best and hoping you are feeling better soon,

    Laura

    I'm posting a link to a site that I found this summer which helped me:

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/supportivecare/depression/Patient/page2
    and a long quote from it as well....

    There are many misconceptions about cancer and how people cope with it, such as the following:

    All people with cancer are depressed.
    Depression in a person with cancer is normal.
    Treatment does not help the depression.
    Everyone with cancer faces suffering and a painful death.
    Sadness and grief are normal reactions to the crises faced during cancer, and will be experienced at times by all people. Because sadness is common, it is important to distinguish between normal levels of sadness and depression. An important part of cancer care is the recognition of depression that needs to be treated. Some people may have more trouble adjusting to the diagnosis of cancer than others may. Major depression is not simply sadness or a blue mood. Major depression affects about 25% of patients and has common symptoms that can be diagnosed and treated. Symptoms of depression that are noticed when a patient is diagnosed with cancer may be a sign that the patient had a depression problem before the diagnosis of cancer.

    All people will experience reactions of sadness and grief periodically throughout diagnosis, treatment, and survival of cancer. When people find out they have cancer, they often have feelings of disbelief, denial, or despair. They may also experience difficulty sleeping, loss of appetite, anxiety, and a preoccupation with worries about the future. These symptoms and fears usually lessen as a person adjusts to the diagnosis. Signs that a person has adjusted to the diagnosis include an ability to maintain active involvement in daily life activities, and an ability to continue functioning as spouse, parent, employee, or other roles by incorporating treatment into his or her schedule. If the family of a patient diagnosed with cancer is able to express feelings openly and solve problems effectively, both the patient and family members have less depression. Good communication within the family reduces anxiety. A person who cannot adjust to the diagnosis after a long period of time, and who loses interest in usual activities, may be depressed. Mild symptoms of depression can be distressing and may be helped with counseling. Even patients without obvious symptoms of depression may benefit from counseling; however, when symptoms are intense and long-lasting, or when they keep coming back, more intensive treatment is important.

    Signs of clinical depression:
    The symptoms of major depression include the following:

    Having a depressed mood for most of the day and on most days.
    Loss of pleasure and interest in most activities.
    Changes in eating and sleeping habits.
    Nervousness or sluggishness.
    Tiredness.
    Feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate guilt.
    Poor concentration.
    Constant thoughts of death or suicide.
    To make a diagnosis of depression, these symptoms should be present on most days for at least 2 weeks. The diagnosis of depression can be difficult to make in people with cancer due to the difficulty of separating the symptoms of depression from the side effects of medications or the symptoms of cancer. This is especially true in patients undergoing active cancer treatment or those with advanced disease. Symptoms of guilt, worthlessness, hopelessness, thoughts of suicide, and loss of pleasure are the most useful in diagnosing depression in people who have cancer.
  • SIROD
    SIROD Member Posts: 2,194 Member
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    dbhadra said:

    battling with cancer can
    be a test of faith for sure. It's hard to believe and keep walking forward not knowing what is coming next. Never beat yourself up for doubting, it's a natural and normal reactions. We are not saints! I have met so many wonderful woman battling BC, but it's very rare to meet ANYONE who can walk through all this with a smile and with perfect faith. I used to beat myself up by not having enough faith in God since I struggled and doubted and got super depressed and anxious. Now I view it as the natural, human process of finding the road to acceptance.

    One day at a time you will get through the chemo and look back and it will be behind you.

    In the meanwhile, if you show signs of clinical depression, there are many good medications out there that can help. I had a clinical depression this summer after surgery and I started on Effexor about 2 months ago. I am feeling better today and was able to go through my current chemo and radiation treatment.

    Wishing you the best and hoping you are feeling better soon,

    Laura

    I'm posting a link to a site that I found this summer which helped me:

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/supportivecare/depression/Patient/page2
    and a long quote from it as well....

    There are many misconceptions about cancer and how people cope with it, such as the following:

    All people with cancer are depressed.
    Depression in a person with cancer is normal.
    Treatment does not help the depression.
    Everyone with cancer faces suffering and a painful death.
    Sadness and grief are normal reactions to the crises faced during cancer, and will be experienced at times by all people. Because sadness is common, it is important to distinguish between normal levels of sadness and depression. An important part of cancer care is the recognition of depression that needs to be treated. Some people may have more trouble adjusting to the diagnosis of cancer than others may. Major depression is not simply sadness or a blue mood. Major depression affects about 25% of patients and has common symptoms that can be diagnosed and treated. Symptoms of depression that are noticed when a patient is diagnosed with cancer may be a sign that the patient had a depression problem before the diagnosis of cancer.

    All people will experience reactions of sadness and grief periodically throughout diagnosis, treatment, and survival of cancer. When people find out they have cancer, they often have feelings of disbelief, denial, or despair. They may also experience difficulty sleeping, loss of appetite, anxiety, and a preoccupation with worries about the future. These symptoms and fears usually lessen as a person adjusts to the diagnosis. Signs that a person has adjusted to the diagnosis include an ability to maintain active involvement in daily life activities, and an ability to continue functioning as spouse, parent, employee, or other roles by incorporating treatment into his or her schedule. If the family of a patient diagnosed with cancer is able to express feelings openly and solve problems effectively, both the patient and family members have less depression. Good communication within the family reduces anxiety. A person who cannot adjust to the diagnosis after a long period of time, and who loses interest in usual activities, may be depressed. Mild symptoms of depression can be distressing and may be helped with counseling. Even patients without obvious symptoms of depression may benefit from counseling; however, when symptoms are intense and long-lasting, or when they keep coming back, more intensive treatment is important.

    Signs of clinical depression:
    The symptoms of major depression include the following:

    Having a depressed mood for most of the day and on most days.
    Loss of pleasure and interest in most activities.
    Changes in eating and sleeping habits.
    Nervousness or sluggishness.
    Tiredness.
    Feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate guilt.
    Poor concentration.
    Constant thoughts of death or suicide.
    To make a diagnosis of depression, these symptoms should be present on most days for at least 2 weeks. The diagnosis of depression can be difficult to make in people with cancer due to the difficulty of separating the symptoms of depression from the side effects of medications or the symptoms of cancer. This is especially true in patients undergoing active cancer treatment or those with advanced disease. Symptoms of guilt, worthlessness, hopelessness, thoughts of suicide, and loss of pleasure are the most useful in diagnosing depression in people who have cancer.

    Source of this Information?
    All people with cancer are depressed.
    Depression in a person with cancer is normal.

    Everyone with cancer faces suffering and a painful death.

    I am stage IV. I have never taken one pill for depression in all the years I dealing with cancer. Some people do experience depression dealing with cancer but certainly not "ALL". I am not depress even with active tumors in my lungs and lining. I work each day though I deal with multiple medical issues beside cancer. I smile, enjoy life as much as anyone can with my limitation. I am not depress and neither are many people who deal with living with active cancer.

    In the old days, people dying of cancer did have a painful death. I am stated over the centuries. From what I learned from years of reading breast cancer forums and knowing many people who did die of cancer, death is usually quick less than a month of sliding toward it and not painful. Morphine is used to help the process.

    Where did you find this information that everyone one dealing with cancer is depress and dying is a painful process? I really would like to know the source?

    Doris
  • camul
    camul Member Posts: 2,537
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    SIROD said:

    Source of this Information?
    All people with cancer are depressed.
    Depression in a person with cancer is normal.

    Everyone with cancer faces suffering and a painful death.

    I am stage IV. I have never taken one pill for depression in all the years I dealing with cancer. Some people do experience depression dealing with cancer but certainly not "ALL". I am not depress even with active tumors in my lungs and lining. I work each day though I deal with multiple medical issues beside cancer. I smile, enjoy life as much as anyone can with my limitation. I am not depress and neither are many people who deal with living with active cancer.

    In the old days, people dying of cancer did have a painful death. I am stated over the centuries. From what I learned from years of reading breast cancer forums and knowing many people who did die of cancer, death is usually quick less than a month of sliding toward it and not painful. Morphine is used to help the process.

    Where did you find this information that everyone one dealing with cancer is depress and dying is a painful process? I really would like to know the source?

    Doris

    Doris--please reread dbhadra post!!!!
    If you read this again, that was one of the misconceptions that she was stating about having cancer, not one of the truths. I too have been going through treatment for quite sometime and will get down from time to time, I have not needed medication for this. This post and the information that is given is to show that you can get down without being clinically depressed. But it is great information in showing some of the warning signs of clinical depression.

    Death from cancer is also not always fast and without pain. I have experienced first hand my father-in-law dying from stomach cancer and this was a very painful three month process from the time that the pain became almost unbearable. My brother passed with bladder cancer that went to his kidney's, liver and spine. Extremely painful. My mother passed from cancer of the mouth that spread into her jawbone and for months she could barely eat or sleep, even water running over her head to shower caused immense pain.

    I can personally tell you that the pain I have in my spine, tailbone, pelvic region, and leg bones is not easy. Pain pills help, but it is not pain free. I have also seen some with cancer whom have had much less pain. I have 2 brothers with CLL and they are not in a lot of pain, and one of these two is also on chemo for small cell lymphoma. I don't believe there is any one formula that will work for anyone. But when it is in the bones, it can be extremely painful.

    I do know however that even with the pain, I work through it and work to stay upbeat and do as much as my body will allow. But by no means is it a walk in the park!

    Thanks for posting dbhadra!
  • ms.sunshine
    ms.sunshine Member Posts: 707 Member
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    camul said:

    Doris--please reread dbhadra post!!!!
    If you read this again, that was one of the misconceptions that she was stating about having cancer, not one of the truths. I too have been going through treatment for quite sometime and will get down from time to time, I have not needed medication for this. This post and the information that is given is to show that you can get down without being clinically depressed. But it is great information in showing some of the warning signs of clinical depression.

    Death from cancer is also not always fast and without pain. I have experienced first hand my father-in-law dying from stomach cancer and this was a very painful three month process from the time that the pain became almost unbearable. My brother passed with bladder cancer that went to his kidney's, liver and spine. Extremely painful. My mother passed from cancer of the mouth that spread into her jawbone and for months she could barely eat or sleep, even water running over her head to shower caused immense pain.

    I can personally tell you that the pain I have in my spine, tailbone, pelvic region, and leg bones is not easy. Pain pills help, but it is not pain free. I have also seen some with cancer whom have had much less pain. I have 2 brothers with CLL and they are not in a lot of pain, and one of these two is also on chemo for small cell lymphoma. I don't believe there is any one formula that will work for anyone. But when it is in the bones, it can be extremely painful.

    I do know however that even with the pain, I work through it and work to stay upbeat and do as much as my body will allow. But by no means is it a walk in the park!

    Thanks for posting dbhadra!

    Help for depression
    Please talk to your dr. You may need meds for depression or there may be another way to deal with what you are going through.

    As far as faith goes, don't beat yourself up. Stop being so hard on yourself. At one time or another in EVERYONES life their faith falters. You learn from it, pick the pieces up and proceed.

    If your faith wasn't challened, then how can it grow. The ones that say, "their faith, and trust has grown," are the ones who have stumbled, and fallen so many times, but have choosen to get up, and try again.

    I learned what the scripture means that reads, "when you are weak, then you are strong." How could that be, doesn't make much sense. When your body is at it's weakest, then your spirit is at it's strongest.
  • SIROD
    SIROD Member Posts: 2,194 Member
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    camul said:

    Doris--please reread dbhadra post!!!!
    If you read this again, that was one of the misconceptions that she was stating about having cancer, not one of the truths. I too have been going through treatment for quite sometime and will get down from time to time, I have not needed medication for this. This post and the information that is given is to show that you can get down without being clinically depressed. But it is great information in showing some of the warning signs of clinical depression.

    Death from cancer is also not always fast and without pain. I have experienced first hand my father-in-law dying from stomach cancer and this was a very painful three month process from the time that the pain became almost unbearable. My brother passed with bladder cancer that went to his kidney's, liver and spine. Extremely painful. My mother passed from cancer of the mouth that spread into her jawbone and for months she could barely eat or sleep, even water running over her head to shower caused immense pain.

    I can personally tell you that the pain I have in my spine, tailbone, pelvic region, and leg bones is not easy. Pain pills help, but it is not pain free. I have also seen some with cancer whom have had much less pain. I have 2 brothers with CLL and they are not in a lot of pain, and one of these two is also on chemo for small cell lymphoma. I don't believe there is any one formula that will work for anyone. But when it is in the bones, it can be extremely painful.

    I do know however that even with the pain, I work through it and work to stay upbeat and do as much as my body will allow. But by no means is it a walk in the park!

    Thanks for posting dbhadra!

    I stand Corrected - Apologies to dbhadra
    Thank you for correcting me, camul. I do appreciate it. I was reading to fast.

    Please accept my apologies dbhadra for my posting to fast and not seeing your line.

    Best to you both,

    Doris
  • MAJW
    MAJW Member Posts: 2,510 Member
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    SIROD said:

    I stand Corrected - Apologies to dbhadra
    Thank you for correcting me, camul. I do appreciate it. I was reading to fast.

    Please accept my apologies dbhadra for my posting to fast and not seeing your line.

    Best to you both,

    Doris

    You beat me to it Camul!
    Was going to respond as you did! You just beat me to it!

    And personally I haven't met one person with cancer of ANY KIND that HASN'T had depression to some degree...I guess some are made of steel...just haven't met them....

    It's a PERSONAL journey...we each do what we have to do to get through the day, hour or minute....

    God Bless us all!
    Nancy
  • Pam5
    Pam5 Member Posts: 232
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    MAJW said:

    You beat me to it Camul!
    Was going to respond as you did! You just beat me to it!

    And personally I haven't met one person with cancer of ANY KIND that HASN'T had depression to some degree...I guess some are made of steel...just haven't met them....

    It's a PERSONAL journey...we each do what we have to do to get through the day, hour or minute....

    God Bless us all!
    Nancy

    I truly believe that God
    I truly believe that God doesn't need us to keep our faith in tact through all these episodes in our lives. God's going to love us and lead us regardless of what we do or don't do. We just need to pay attention so we can do the next right thing for ourselves. Sometimes I take things 5 minutes at a time. Sometimes I can take things a day at a time. I couldn't finish my chemo treatments because I kept getting pneumonia on top of pneumonia on top of pneumonia. So now I'm on hormone therapy with the hope it will do the same thing - shrink the tumor. Because I'm breathing better - today was a lovely day - went to church, talked to my kids, cooked with my partner, played with our pup - just a wonderful day. That's all any of us have - just today. Don't beat yourself up. You will have good and bad days. Everything passes and feelings are not facts - they're just feelings. God bless you.

    Hugs,
    Pam
  • dbhadra
    dbhadra Member Posts: 344 Member
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    Pam5 said:

    I truly believe that God
    I truly believe that God doesn't need us to keep our faith in tact through all these episodes in our lives. God's going to love us and lead us regardless of what we do or don't do. We just need to pay attention so we can do the next right thing for ourselves. Sometimes I take things 5 minutes at a time. Sometimes I can take things a day at a time. I couldn't finish my chemo treatments because I kept getting pneumonia on top of pneumonia on top of pneumonia. So now I'm on hormone therapy with the hope it will do the same thing - shrink the tumor. Because I'm breathing better - today was a lovely day - went to church, talked to my kids, cooked with my partner, played with our pup - just a wonderful day. That's all any of us have - just today. Don't beat yourself up. You will have good and bad days. Everything passes and feelings are not facts - they're just feelings. God bless you.

    Hugs,
    Pam

    yes, those are misconceptions that I posted...
    from a link on cancer.gov that I've found helpful. I think they are fairly common.

    Cancer does not equal depression! That;s why it's important to distinguish between feelings of sadness and grief - certainly a normal reactions to cancer and some of its more unpleasant aspects - and clinical depression - which can be treated with medication.

    My personal experience : I've been living with cancer since Dec 2010, but was clinically depressed only in July/August. Sure, before that I had felt sad, cried, but was going on with my life...but then spent most of July and part of August almost unable to function....constant crying, sleeping, no interest in formerly pleasurable activities, anxiety attacks....had all the classic signs of clinical depression...now being treated with medication and feeling much more able to deal with the situation. I think we do ourselves a disservice when we say that "depression is a normal response to cancer" and don;t take any steps to alleviate it. Yes, we have feelings (and would not be normal if we had no feelings) but clinical depression is more than that; it;s an illness like any other and can be treated.

    and yes, many people with cancer do have a lot of pain and my quote was in no way to minimize that ...I watched my own mother die of breast cancer and she did suffer a lot of pain and it was horrible. Thank God towards the end her pain medications were better adjusted and she had some comfort when she passed at Hospice. But I do think it's untrue to say that ALL who die of cancer die a painful death; it does vary a lot from person to person and depends on the cancer and the way it has spread, the medication taken, and so many other factors.

    Laura
  • CypressCynthia
    CypressCynthia Member Posts: 4,014 Member
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    While many people with
    While many people with cancer may not suffer with depression, many do. The day after day dealing with diagnosis, anxiety, testing and treatments can get to many, many of us.

    The great news is that your physician should know this and be able to help. Talk with your oncologist first so that, if you are prescribed meds, you are prescribed ones that are compatible with treatment.

    I take lexapro and it has really helped. My younger sister, Wendy, sees a psychologist who has helped her.

    Every word in your post screams depression to me. Know this--you do not need to suffer and there is help out there!

    Here is a self assessment screening from the Mayo Clinic:

    Self Assessment for Depression

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/depression/MH00103_D
  • Eil4186
    Eil4186 Member Posts: 949
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    I am so sad to read your
    I am so sad to read your post. Cancer treatment is very difficult and draining. When I was having my chemo, I kept wanting to stop, and I suffered from depression also. One wonders why God allows so much suffering. These are tough questions.

    You must hang in there though and believe that this is temporary. You have to stay strong somehow, and keep plugging along. The situation you are in can make everything seem very dark and dismal.

    There is a light at the end of the tunnel and when you get there you will begin to feel better. You'll see. Don't give up. Don't.
  • Eil4186
    Eil4186 Member Posts: 949
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    I am so sad to read your
    I am so sad to read your post. Cancer treatment is very difficult and draining. When I was having my chemo, I kept wanting to stop, and I suffered from depression also. One wonders why God allows so much suffering. These are tough questions.

    You must hang in there though and believe that this is temporary. You have to stay strong somehow, and keep plugging along. The situation you are in can make everything seem very dark and dismal.

    There is a light at the end of the tunnel and when you get there you will begin to feel better. You'll see. Don't give up. Don't.