FYI- scientific study of effects of curcumin/turmeric on colorectal cancer

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lisa42
lisa42 Member Posts: 3,625 Member
Hi,

I know that in our alternative/supplements discussions, tumeric has been discussed as being beneficial. Here's the results of a study on it from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. It seems to have amazing results! This is copied from Life Extension Magazine online. Read below...
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Curcumin Blocks Hormone Involved in Colorectal Cancer

In a report that appeared in the September 15, 2006 issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston described their finding that curcumin, a compound contained in the spice turmeric, blocks the activity of a gastrointestinal hormone that is involved in the development of colorectal cancer. Curcumin has previously been discovered to help combat a variety of tumor cells, and has been shown to help reduce colon polyps in one small clinical trial.

In research with cell cultures, University of Texas Medical Branch surgery professor B. Mark Evers and his colleagues found that curcumin blocks the activity of a hormone produced in response to the consumption of fat called neurotensin, which they linked to the production of the inflammatory protein interleukin-8. Interleukin-8 increases the growth and spread of human colorectal, pancreatic and other cancer cells. Curcumin acts by reducing biochemical signals within the cell that neurotensin utilizes, thereby lowering the production of interleukin-8.

"We found that in colon cancer cells, neurotensin increases not just the rate of growth but also other critical things, including cell migration and metastasis," Dr Evers noted. "The fact that all that can be turned off by this natural product, curcumin, was really remarkable."

"Our findings suggest that curcumin may be useful for colon cancer treatment, as well as potential colon cancer suppression, in cells that respond to this gastrointestinal hormone, neurotensin," Dr Evers concluded. "About a third of all colorectal cancer cells have the receptor for neurotensin. Thus, the concept would be sort of like what we do for breast and prostate cancer, where the main therapy involves blocking hormones. We hope to do similar things with gastrointestinal cancers that respond to this hormone."


—D Dye

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  • laurettas
    laurettas Member Posts: 372
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    Very interesting!
    I wonder if it is helpful for those whose cancer has metastasized and is no longer located in the colon but everywhere else. Hopefully we will hear more soon.

    Here is another study with a very different substance:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110913152929.htm

    It will be so fascinating to see from what source is found the best treatment for cancer. We may be shocked when they finally discover it!
  • lisa42
    lisa42 Member Posts: 3,625 Member
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    laurettas said:

    Very interesting!
    I wonder if it is helpful for those whose cancer has metastasized and is no longer located in the colon but everywhere else. Hopefully we will hear more soon.

    Here is another study with a very different substance:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110913152929.htm

    It will be so fascinating to see from what source is found the best treatment for cancer. We may be shocked when they finally discover it!

    link didn't work for me
    Hi Laurettas,

    I tried copying and pasting your link into my browser and when I clicked on it, it said "sorry page could not be found". Don't know if it's a faulty link or if it's just my computer.

    There is something in the article above that mentions it can stop or slow down the growth and spread in already metastasized cancer- didn't word it that way, but that's what I think it meant. Mentioned colon cancer prevention but also possible colon cancer suppression. I'm definitely going to keep taking it!
  • laurettas
    laurettas Member Posts: 372
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    lisa42 said:

    link didn't work for me
    Hi Laurettas,

    I tried copying and pasting your link into my browser and when I clicked on it, it said "sorry page could not be found". Don't know if it's a faulty link or if it's just my computer.

    There is something in the article above that mentions it can stop or slow down the growth and spread in already metastasized cancer- didn't word it that way, but that's what I think it meant. Mentioned colon cancer prevention but also possible colon cancer suppression. I'm definitely going to keep taking it!

    Hmmmm......
    I copied and pasted it from my post and it worked. Don't know what the problem is. Sorry!
  • herdizziness
    herdizziness Member Posts: 3,624 Member
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    lisa42 said:

    link didn't work for me
    Hi Laurettas,

    I tried copying and pasting your link into my browser and when I clicked on it, it said "sorry page could not be found". Don't know if it's a faulty link or if it's just my computer.

    There is something in the article above that mentions it can stop or slow down the growth and spread in already metastasized cancer- didn't word it that way, but that's what I think it meant. Mentioned colon cancer prevention but also possible colon cancer suppression. I'm definitely going to keep taking it!

    Try this Lisa
    Protein
  • lisa42
    lisa42 Member Posts: 3,625 Member
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    Try this Lisa
    Protein

    Great
    Great-thanks, Winter Marie! It's a good link. :)

    Lisa
  • lisa42
    lisa42 Member Posts: 3,625 Member
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    laurettas said:

    Hmmmm......
    I copied and pasted it from my post and it worked. Don't know what the problem is. Sorry!

    it worked this time
    I guess it was my computer acting up because it did work this time. Good information- thanks!

    Lisa
  • laurettas
    laurettas Member Posts: 372
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    Try this Lisa
    Protein

    Someday
    Maybe some day I will learn how to make a clickable link. Thanks, Winter Marie!
  • tanstaafl
    tanstaafl Member Posts: 1,313 Member
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    $, user blogs, bioavailability
    Thanks, Lisa. That reminds, and motivates, me to work on curcumin - one of our underutilized anti-cancer nutrients.

    Effective methods, use levels, and bioavailabilty of curcumin have been a sticking point. LEF has their pricey, "high bioavailability" Biocurcumax caps, where previously they offered the now common, curcumin-95 with bioperine type formula. Others use curcumin recipes with oils, coconut milk, and/or chocolate to improve bioavailabity.

    For now, I like Margaret's myeloma-curcumin blog. These folks are using up to 8 grams of curcumin per day and tracking their biomarkers, like IgG, to assess curcumin delivery methods. The reduced dose, "high bioavailability" Biocurcumax (BCM-095) formula was a diappointment for several of them. So I'm focused on curcumin-95 with and without bioperine, probably dissolved in warm, oil based recipes.
  • coloCan
    coloCan Member Posts: 1,944 Member
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    tanstaafl said:

    $, user blogs, bioavailability
    Thanks, Lisa. That reminds, and motivates, me to work on curcumin - one of our underutilized anti-cancer nutrients.

    Effective methods, use levels, and bioavailabilty of curcumin have been a sticking point. LEF has their pricey, "high bioavailability" Biocurcumax caps, where previously they offered the now common, curcumin-95 with bioperine type formula. Others use curcumin recipes with oils, coconut milk, and/or chocolate to improve bioavailabity.

    For now, I like Margaret's myeloma-curcumin blog. These folks are using up to 8 grams of curcumin per day and tracking their biomarkers, like IgG, to assess curcumin delivery methods. The reduced dose, "high bioavailability" Biocurcumax (BCM-095) formula was a diappointment for several of them. So I'm focused on curcumin-95 with and without bioperine, probably dissolved in warm, oil based recipes.

    Try this article:"Nanotechnology-enhanced curcumin" at
    nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=22677.php

    and a much briefer one:cmjournal.org/content/6/1/31/abstract
  • pete43lost_at_sea
    pete43lost_at_sea Member Posts: 3,900 Member
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    thanks Lisa and all
    I was feeling a bit like a walking corpse when my nurse
    Friend who described duke c prognosis was like 10 year's ago.
    Which back then was Like 20 %.

    It's my daughter's 1st communion today and a I missed a few Days of supplements, this post has got reminded me of all the good science behind supplements.

    I take 2 x 3.8g turmeric morn and even.
    The expensive bio avail type with biopeperin.

    I also add knob of numeric to my vege juices most mornings.

    Back in my research Days, I remember some numeric studies out of Sloane where the reason turmeric bioavail was studied.
    Cucumin gets absorbed from the blood stream within 30min and into cells.
    My understanding is the numeric gets absorbed so effectively by cells that it does not appear in the blood after 30min.

    This is just my recollection but it gives me hope.

    Hugs,
    Pete
  • tanstaafl
    tanstaafl Member Posts: 1,313 Member
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    coloCan said:

    Try this article:"Nanotechnology-enhanced curcumin" at
    nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=22677.php

    and a much briefer one:cmjournal.org/content/6/1/31/abstract

    cC's surface chem links
    Thanks coloCan. Most of what is called nanotechnology here, uses the art and science of surface chemistry to make "emulsions", "micellar solutions", "liposomes" and related vehicles for curcumin.
    ColoCan's first link, Nanotechnology enhanced curcumin

    ColoCan's 2nd link is an abstract for an 88 page paper in Chinese Medicine, 2011. Skimming, I found the following quote of interest - both for formulation with resveratrol, another extract with bioavailability problems, and the potential Folfox application. Perhaps especially for those who have been left empty handed or intimidated by other folfox incompatibility claims.
    From pp 19-20, "another dietary resveratrol, pan-erbB inhibitor (EGF-R related protein, ERRP), S rc inhibitor dasatinib, 5-fluorouracil and/or oxaliplatin also induced greater antiproliferative, anti-invasive and/or apoptotic effects on diverse colorectal cancer cell lines than individual drugs in vitro and in vivo [2, 170-172]."