newly diagosed

shighfield31
shighfield31 Member Posts: 2
I was diagnosed in april. I had cancer in both ovaries and in my uterus. I was tld at first that it was just a tumor the blood test came back neg. Dr done a hystorectomy and found the cancer. I start chemo next week and I am scared to death. I am moody and out os sorts is this kind of reaction normal. any suggestions on how to cope with my fears,

Comments

  • clamryn
    clamryn Member Posts: 508
    Hello,
    Yes, your reaction is very normal. I didn't know what to think when they told me. So many different things go through your head. For myself, I had to cry it out first. Then I started to get myself together and had questions on top of questions that I wanted answered. I had a very good support system around me and I hope you will find that you do too. Some of those that you think will stick by you...might not. And there are those that you didn't think would be there for you...they will. It is all strange how the "C" word affects people.

    I am so sorry that you had to come to this board; but all the ladies on here will help you. Your questions and fears will all be answered. We are all here for you.

    Since you will be starting your chemo next week, I can tell you that it is not as scary as it seems. Chemo doesn't hurt. And you will be given medication to prevent any nausea or sickness.

    Keep busy, do things you want to do, call your friends, and come here as often as you want.


    Hugs
    Linda
  • mopar
    mopar Member Posts: 1,972 Member
    WE'RE HERE FOR YOU
    So sorry to hear your facing this horrible disease, but so glad you found this discussion board.

    Do you have a gynecologic/oncologist? Did they remove everything? What stage is the cancer?

    Your reaction is more than normal, it's to be expected. We all handle the news differently, and even differently at different times throughout the journey. One thing is for certain - you have lots of shoulders to lean on here. We can offer tips to get through the chemo (what kind will you have?), and try to answer any questions you may have.

    As for the fear, for me I always did better when I knew what to expect. Sometimes too much information isn't good, but the more I know the more I am able to face and to cope with, and oftentimes, it doesn't even happen! A good friend, Bonnie, another teal warrior once said, 'fear is FALSE EXPECTATIONS APPEARING REAL'. In other words, what you often fear never comes to pass. I have a faith in God that gets me through anything, so I put the fear in His hands and let Him do all the worrying for me.

    Please let us know how you're doing and give us more details so that we can help.

    (((HUGS))) & Prayers,
    Monika
  • mopar
    mopar Member Posts: 1,972 Member
    WE'RE HERE FOR YOU
    So sorry to hear your facing this horrible disease, but so glad you found this discussion board.

    Do you have a gynecologic/oncologist? Did they remove everything? What stage is the cancer?

    Your reaction is more than normal, it's to be expected. We all handle the news differently, and even differently at different times throughout the journey. One thing is for certain - you have lots of shoulders to lean on here. We can offer tips to get through the chemo (what kind will you have?), and try to answer any questions you may have.

    As for the fear, for me I always did better when I knew what to expect. Sometimes too much information isn't good, but the more I know the more I am able to face and to cope with, and oftentimes, it doesn't even happen! A good friend, Bonnie, another teal warrior once said, 'fear is FALSE EXPECTATIONS APPEARING REAL'. In other words, what you often fear never comes to pass. I have a faith in God that gets me through anything, so I put the fear in His hands and let Him do all the worrying for me.

    Please let us know how you're doing and give us more details so that we can help.

    (((HUGS))) & Prayers,
    Monika
  • Mwee
    Mwee Member Posts: 1,338
    Welcome
    Sorry to meet you this way, but you have found your way to a very loving, supportive and understanding group of survivors. Of course you're scared, but we're right here to help you every step of the way. Even the word "chemo" is scary, but it is doable. Let us know the name of the chemo you're going on (carbo/taxol?) and we'll be able to help you with what to expect. You are not alone. We were all newly diagnosed at first and for me the best way to cope with my fears is to have as much information as possible.
    (((HUGS))) Maria
  • srwruns
    srwruns Member Posts: 343
    You'll get lots of support
    You'll get lots of support here...regardless of when you are feeling moody and down or upbeat about good news. The beginning of the journey can be terrifying...it certainly was for me. After the first treatment it becomes more routine. I remember texting onto this board as I sat in the chemo chair the first time shaking like a leaf. Fear of the unknown and all that...once you know what it is like you know how to do what needs to be done.
  • Hissy_Fitz
    Hissy_Fitz Member Posts: 1,834
    I think you're entitled to
    I think you're entitled to "moody" and "out of sorts." Cancer is a huge thing to deal with. I cried at the drop of a hat, for months.

    The first thing my techie brain told me to do was Google "ovarian cancer." Of course, everything I read scared the hell out of me. I truly thought I would be dead before now. Obviously, that didn't happen. All that anguish for nothing. Don't let yourself get mired down in charts and statistics.

    What stage is your cancer? My blood test (CA125) was over the top high before surgery (4000, whereas normal is 35 or less) and mine was staged at IIIc.

    Carlene
  • poopergirl14052
    poopergirl14052 Member Posts: 1,183 Member

    I think you're entitled to
    I think you're entitled to "moody" and "out of sorts." Cancer is a huge thing to deal with. I cried at the drop of a hat, for months.

    The first thing my techie brain told me to do was Google "ovarian cancer." Of course, everything I read scared the hell out of me. I truly thought I would be dead before now. Obviously, that didn't happen. All that anguish for nothing. Don't let yourself get mired down in charts and statistics.

    What stage is your cancer? My blood test (CA125) was over the top high before surgery (4000, whereas normal is 35 or less) and mine was staged at IIIc.

    Carlene

    you deserve a little me time
    so you can cry and be moody if you please. After your initial shock wears off you be be ready to fight and fight hard. We are all here to help, just say the word..val
  • shighfield31
    shighfield31 Member Posts: 2
    mopar said:

    WE'RE HERE FOR YOU
    So sorry to hear your facing this horrible disease, but so glad you found this discussion board.

    Do you have a gynecologic/oncologist? Did they remove everything? What stage is the cancer?

    Your reaction is more than normal, it's to be expected. We all handle the news differently, and even differently at different times throughout the journey. One thing is for certain - you have lots of shoulders to lean on here. We can offer tips to get through the chemo (what kind will you have?), and try to answer any questions you may have.

    As for the fear, for me I always did better when I knew what to expect. Sometimes too much information isn't good, but the more I know the more I am able to face and to cope with, and oftentimes, it doesn't even happen! A good friend, Bonnie, another teal warrior once said, 'fear is FALSE EXPECTATIONS APPEARING REAL'. In other words, what you often fear never comes to pass. I have a faith in God that gets me through anything, so I put the fear in His hands and let Him do all the worrying for me.

    Please let us know how you're doing and give us more details so that we can help.

    (((HUGS))) & Prayers,
    Monika

    Thank you all so much for
    Thank you all so much for the support. My gyn. sent me to a gyn/oncologist at a new womens clinic in my area. The Dr said that they got it all and that I would have to take the chemo to make sure there isn't anything that was left behind from the surgery. I couldn't have made it through what i have so far without my husband or my mother. I have another question for you all. I think when they did the hystorectomy it sent me into menapaus. I was going to talk to my Dr. about it at my next visit. Mother said she heard that they wouldn't give me any hormones for it because the cancer would feed on them has anyone else heard of that.
  • Tethys41
    Tethys41 Member Posts: 1,379 Member

    Thank you all so much for
    Thank you all so much for the support. My gyn. sent me to a gyn/oncologist at a new womens clinic in my area. The Dr said that they got it all and that I would have to take the chemo to make sure there isn't anything that was left behind from the surgery. I couldn't have made it through what i have so far without my husband or my mother. I have another question for you all. I think when they did the hystorectomy it sent me into menapaus. I was going to talk to my Dr. about it at my next visit. Mother said she heard that they wouldn't give me any hormones for it because the cancer would feed on them has anyone else heard of that.

    Menopause
    Yes, if they removed both ovaries, you are officially in surgical menopause. And you do not want to take any hormones, as most of these cancers are hormone sensitive. If you are willing to work with a naturopath and/or accupuncturist, they may be able to help with your menopausal symptoms. There are also some antidepressants that can help with your symptoms, if you want to go that route. Your oncologist should be able to prescribe those for you.