Sheer cost

Radioactive34
Radioactive34 Member Posts: 391 Member
One of the things that is staggering is the sheer cost of this. Just to get diagnosed I:

-Went to Urgent Care
->Had various radiology and labs test run
-Then went to the regular OB/GYN
-After that went to the an Oncologist GYN
->Had surgery
->spent multiple days there
->the sheer amount of labs were eye crossing
-Had more scans after
-Have had two other doctors visit
-Finally made it to the oncologist who is going to work the chemo

All done in about 6 weeks. Even with insurance this is just a financial vacumn. There have been work days lost. I live far from family. They are setting up a rotation schedule so someone is here while I do chemo. The travel costs associated there....

OMG, this is just the beginning....how do you handle all of this? It feels overwhelming. I am besides myself trying to figure out just this aspect, longterm.

R34

Comments

  • jbeans888
    jbeans888 Member Posts: 313
    I understand what you mean
    I understand what you mean by expensive. I also don't live by any family so when I got diagnosed my parents had to fly down to stay with me as I am going thru chemo. My mom had to take work leave without any pay. I felt so bad.

    I don't know where you live but most public hospitals have charity care where they will cover part or all expenses. Many also go by income. I suggest you call the hospital social worker and find out If they provide any financial assistance. That's what I did because I have no insurance and they are covering all my bills. Also you can apply for emergency Medicaid. If you are approved Medicaid pays first and then charity will pick up the rest.

    You should also call the American Cancer society 1800-227-2345. They offer a $25 gas gift card to help you get to chemo. They will first try to find you a ride from a volunteer in your area to and from chemo if they can't they will send you the gift card. You can do that up to 3 times but must have your chemo dates and time. it's not much, but it is something. If you don't want to do that you can ask them if they know of any other organizations that offer financial assistance. I know there 1 or 2. If I come across them I will post.
  • lindaprocopio
    lindaprocopio Member Posts: 1,980
    My insurance paid out over $1 million so far in 2 1/2 years.
    I'm so sorry you have to go through this. Cancer is big business, sad but true. You can't get bogged down in the details; you can't let it overwhelm you this early in the game. Your focus needs to be on your health. When people ask "what can I do to help?", be ready with suggestions of things that could make this easier for you (meals, housecleaning when you are in treatment, transportation to appointments, etc.)

    This IS just the beginning, and you need to pace yourself with the stress. We'll all try and help you get your game face on. I always say "this is a marathon; not a sprint". ((((Hugs)))). I cried my eyes out when I got my diagnosis; and things can still make me cry. But I laugh 1000 times more than I cry now. You'll get there.
  • Tethys41
    Tethys41 Member Posts: 1,379 Member
    Family
    R34,
    The best thing my practitioner said, once I was diagnosed, after she misdiagnosed my condition for 3 months, was, "If you have family near a specialist, go stay with them, as you will be spending a lot of time seeing the specialist." My case was somewhat different because I live about 4 hours away from the nearest gynecological oncologist. But if you have family where you can see a good specialist, perhaps you should consider staying with them, at least for awhile.

    Some people work part time while undergoing treatment. I had great aspirations that I would do that. As it turned out, I couldn't have worked if my life depended on it. This diagnosis completely changes your life. Although you may want to keep some degree of normalcy by staying home, it may be in your best interest to go where you can get the support you need, and where others can arrange things for you.
    Take care,
  • Hissy_Fitz
    Hissy_Fitz Member Posts: 1,834
    Tethys41 said:

    Family
    R34,
    The best thing my practitioner said, once I was diagnosed, after she misdiagnosed my condition for 3 months, was, "If you have family near a specialist, go stay with them, as you will be spending a lot of time seeing the specialist." My case was somewhat different because I live about 4 hours away from the nearest gynecological oncologist. But if you have family where you can see a good specialist, perhaps you should consider staying with them, at least for awhile.

    Some people work part time while undergoing treatment. I had great aspirations that I would do that. As it turned out, I couldn't have worked if my life depended on it. This diagnosis completely changes your life. Although you may want to keep some degree of normalcy by staying home, it may be in your best interest to go where you can get the support you need, and where others can arrange things for you.
    Take care,

    R34....
    As Linda said,

    R34....

    As Linda said, Cancer is BIG business, and very expensive. I have a neighbor who has one of the Medicare alternatives and the benefits are not nearly as good as traditional Medicare. But our doctor got her into a trial that pays 100% of her chemo. You might ask your doctor about clinical trials.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't get better. All during treatment, you will have to have labs to check your white and red blood counts, CT scans to make sure there is no recurrance, and perhaps blood transfusions and/or shots (VERY costly shots) to boost your blood count. There will be a financial counselor at your infusion center. Make an appointment with him/her ASAP, and be very up-front about your financial situation. They will work out a payment plan with you.

    And please come back and post questions, vents, and especially GOOD news.

    Carlene