A Possible Reason for Lifestyle Changes

carolenk
carolenk Member Posts: 907 Member
In my opinion, the following information (published in Cancer Research, April 15, 2003, Volume 63; page 1727) supports the benefit of lifestyle changes a person might do to improve their survivorability after OVCA & PPC. Although the research has not actually been done on OVCA, some OVCAs and PPC are considered to be "epithelial cancers" and the last sentence of the abstract includes "epithelial cancers."

I put this into the category of "weed and feed" to prevent the "pre-neoplastic" (pre-cancerous) cells from going over to "the dark side."

A Genetic Explanation of Slaughter’s Concept of Field Cancerization Evidence and Clinical Implications
1. Boudewijn J. M. Braakhuis,
2. Maarten P. Tabor,
3. J. Alain Kummer,
4. C. René Leemans, and
5. Ruud H. Brakenhoff

Author Affiliations
1. Departments of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Section Tumor Biology [B. J. M. B., M. P. T., C. R. L., R. H. B.] and Department of Pathology [J. A. K.], Oncology Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, P. O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Abstract
The concept of “field cancerization” was first introduced by Slaughter et al. [D. P, Slaughter et al., Cancer (Phila.), 6: 963–968, 1953] in 1953 when studying the presence of histologically abnormal tissue surrounding oral squamous cell carcinoma. It was proposed to explain the development of multiple primary tumors and locally recurrent cancer. Organ systems in which field cancerization has been described since then are: head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, and larynx), lung, vulva, esophagus, cervix, breast, skin, colon, and bladder.

Recent molecular findings support the carcinogenesis model in which the development of a field with genetically altered cells plays a central role. In the initial phase, a stem cell acquires genetic alterations and forms a “patch,” a clonal unit of altered daughter cells. These patches can be recognized on the basis of mutations in TP53, and have been reported for head and neck, lung, skin, and breast cancer. The conversion of a patch into an expanding field is the next logical and critical step in epithelial carcinogenesis.

Additional genetic alterations are required for this step, and by virtue of its growth advantage, a proliferating field gradually displaces the normal mucosa. In the mucosa of the head and neck, as well as the esophagus, such fields have been detected with dimensions of >7 cm in diameter, whereas they are usually not detected by routine diagnostic techniques. Ultimately, clonal divergence leads to the development of one or more tumors within a contiguous field of preneoplastic cells.

An important clinical implication is that fields often remain after surgery of the primary tumor and may lead to new cancers, designated presently by clinicians as “a second primary tumor” or “local recurrence,” depending on the exact site and time interval. In conclusion, the development of an expanding preneoplastic field appears to be a critical step in epithelial carcinogenesis with important clinical consequences. Diagnosis and treatment of epithelial cancers should not only be focused on the tumor but also on the field from which it developed.

Comments

  • Tethys41
    Tethys41 Member Posts: 1,376 Member
    This information seems so logical...
    It makes me wonder whether it has ever previously been considered. Why wouldn't you try to remove ALL altered cells, rather than just the cancerous ones?
  • LaundryQueen
    LaundryQueen Member Posts: 676
    Tethys41 said:

    This information seems so logical...
    It makes me wonder whether it has ever previously been considered. Why wouldn't you try to remove ALL altered cells, rather than just the cancerous ones?

    Cancer fields
    I looked into this controversial area of cancer fields and it appears that traditional methods for detecting tumors (ultrasound, MRI, CT or PET scans) do not detect the cancer fields. There has to be some kind of molecular assay done--and it is only in the research phase at this time.

    It reminds me of the what I read years ago about acupuncture meridians being mapped out energetically somehow by physicists.

    I have added acupuncture to my wellness program as I have a gut feeling that it good for me.
  • carolenk
    carolenk Member Posts: 907 Member

    Cancer fields
    I looked into this controversial area of cancer fields and it appears that traditional methods for detecting tumors (ultrasound, MRI, CT or PET scans) do not detect the cancer fields. There has to be some kind of molecular assay done--and it is only in the research phase at this time.

    It reminds me of the what I read years ago about acupuncture meridians being mapped out energetically somehow by physicists.

    I have added acupuncture to my wellness program as I have a gut feeling that it good for me.

    Preventing cancer recurrence
    Seems like some breast cancer researchers are interested in cancer fields to predict who would benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy and who wouldn't to prevent recurrence.

    Since there is such a disparity in the amount of money spent for breast cancer research compared to ovarian cancer research (from the www.ocrf.org web site: Ovarian cancer has a 46% five-year survival rate and receives $8.8 million in research from the Department of Defense; breast cancer has a five-year survival rate of 89% and receives $122.8 million), perhaps this is one area of research that may benefit all people dealing with epithelial cancers.