Re: Nutrition Question..... Flaxseed?

Christine B.
Christine B. Member Posts: 137
edited March 2011 in Ovarian Cancer #1
Hello, This question is for Monika (Mopar) and anyone else who might know more about the benefits or risks of flaxseed for ovarian cancer. Please correct me if I'm wrong, Monika you said that flaxseed as related to estrogen should not be used? Can you or anyone else expand my understanding as to the risks or benefits of including flax seed in the ovarian cancer fighting diet? Thank you, Chris

Comments

  • mopar
    mopar Member Posts: 1,972 Member
    FLAXSEED
    Chris:
    This is a loaded question, and I sure don't have all the answers. But in my research (which was ironically confirmed through other sources through a couple of years), flaxseed is one of the 'plants that produce chemicals that mimic estrogen and/or block estrogen, and/or block progesterone. That's where the problem comes in. It all has to do with how it binds to estrogen and progesterone, etc. Although some articles say the flaxseed is not as bad as other foods, and know that Red Clover is another, and I have a list. I'm not at home right now, but if you're intersted I can post it later.

    Too bad too, because I was using flaxseed in everything. It's a great digestive fiber, has other good nutrients, and I really liked the taste. I used it in baked goods, too. I'm sure in small amounts it may not be a big deal. But in the grand scheme of things, flaxseed and other estrogen enhancers may be too much cumulative.

    Again, because there's not a lot of $$ in the research, they still don't know much, but at least know enough to caution us. Common sense, all things in moderation, still supercedes it all, I guess.

    Hope that helps, Chris!

    (((HUGS)))
    Monika
  • Christine B.
    Christine B. Member Posts: 137
    mopar said:

    FLAXSEED
    Chris:
    This is a loaded question, and I sure don't have all the answers. But in my research (which was ironically confirmed through other sources through a couple of years), flaxseed is one of the 'plants that produce chemicals that mimic estrogen and/or block estrogen, and/or block progesterone. That's where the problem comes in. It all has to do with how it binds to estrogen and progesterone, etc. Although some articles say the flaxseed is not as bad as other foods, and know that Red Clover is another, and I have a list. I'm not at home right now, but if you're intersted I can post it later.

    Too bad too, because I was using flaxseed in everything. It's a great digestive fiber, has other good nutrients, and I really liked the taste. I used it in baked goods, too. I'm sure in small amounts it may not be a big deal. But in the grand scheme of things, flaxseed and other estrogen enhancers may be too much cumulative.

    Again, because there's not a lot of $$ in the research, they still don't know much, but at least know enough to caution us. Common sense, all things in moderation, still supercedes it all, I guess.

    Hope that helps, Chris!

    (((HUGS)))
    Monika

    Thank you for the information.
    Monika, I think I will stay away from the flaxseed. As you said there is not enough information out there to validate its benefits or risks. Yes, I would like to see the list you have. You also mentioned a DIM supplement in your post, can you tell me more about it and where it can be found? I love cooked broccoli, so eating a lot of that is a given for me :) Thanks again, Chris
  • mopar
    mopar Member Posts: 1,972 Member

    Thank you for the information.
    Monika, I think I will stay away from the flaxseed. As you said there is not enough information out there to validate its benefits or risks. Yes, I would like to see the list you have. You also mentioned a DIM supplement in your post, can you tell me more about it and where it can be found? I love cooked broccoli, so eating a lot of that is a given for me :) Thanks again, Chris

    FOOD LIST AND ANSWER FOR ANNICA
    Annica:
    The reason that the cooked broccoli is favored over the raw is that the cooking process releases the DIM which is the Diindolylmethane that helps the proper metabolism of estrogen. There's a more scientific explanation on-line.

    Chris, you can get DIM just about anywhere as a supplement. And it's found in the cruciferous veges such as broccoli, cabbage, etc.

    The list of herbs and foods that have estrogenic activities are:
    Anise, hobs, fennel, black cohosh, milk thistle, clover, red clover, Don Quai, licorice, ginseng, royal jelly, peony, nettle, sage, fenugreek, evening primrose oil, burdock, chamomile, rhubarb. Food: french bean, date palm, dates, garlic, pomegranate, alfalfa, apple, soybean, chick pea, cherry, alfalfa, soy sprouts, cow peak, green beans, red beans, split peas, flaxseed, raspberry, carrot and squash.

    Obviously we can't stay away from everything, nor should we. I just would rather be informed and take all the information I have and use it the best that I can. Being informed makes me able to be proactive. And being proactive in our health gives us hope and the extra edge we need. And for the people who say they've had a healthy lifestyle - ate well, exercised, etc., I'm just thinking what would it be like if they didn't do that? Or how many years did they avoid disease by doing everything they could for themselves? We'll never know for sure. But why not do what we can? Just my thoughts.

    And, of course, about 92% of all those items listed I like! Oh well, hope this helps!

    Prayers & Hugs to All!
    Monika
  • anicca
    anicca Member Posts: 334 Member
    mopar said:

    FOOD LIST AND ANSWER FOR ANNICA
    Annica:
    The reason that the cooked broccoli is favored over the raw is that the cooking process releases the DIM which is the Diindolylmethane that helps the proper metabolism of estrogen. There's a more scientific explanation on-line.

    Chris, you can get DIM just about anywhere as a supplement. And it's found in the cruciferous veges such as broccoli, cabbage, etc.

    The list of herbs and foods that have estrogenic activities are:
    Anise, hobs, fennel, black cohosh, milk thistle, clover, red clover, Don Quai, licorice, ginseng, royal jelly, peony, nettle, sage, fenugreek, evening primrose oil, burdock, chamomile, rhubarb. Food: french bean, date palm, dates, garlic, pomegranate, alfalfa, apple, soybean, chick pea, cherry, alfalfa, soy sprouts, cow peak, green beans, red beans, split peas, flaxseed, raspberry, carrot and squash.

    Obviously we can't stay away from everything, nor should we. I just would rather be informed and take all the information I have and use it the best that I can. Being informed makes me able to be proactive. And being proactive in our health gives us hope and the extra edge we need. And for the people who say they've had a healthy lifestyle - ate well, exercised, etc., I'm just thinking what would it be like if they didn't do that? Or how many years did they avoid disease by doing everything they could for themselves? We'll never know for sure. But why not do what we can? Just my thoughts.

    And, of course, about 92% of all those items listed I like! Oh well, hope this helps!

    Prayers & Hugs to All!
    Monika

    Thank you. I'm in the same
    Thank you. I'm in the same boat - love most of the things listed.
  • LaundryQueen
    LaundryQueen Member Posts: 676
    anicca said:

    Thank you. I'm in the same
    Thank you. I'm in the same boat - love most of the things listed.

    Some thoughts on estrogenic effects of food/herbs
    Not sure where you are getting your information from regarding estrogenic effects of foods & herbs.

    There are a lot of generalizations regarding "estrogenic effects" in the literature. Keep in mind that some phytoestrogens bind to estrogen receptors and block them and some phytoestrogens bind to estrogen receptors and activate them. Too confusing!

    The xenoestrogens from plastics are more of an issue to be wary of...especially when you consider food has been around a whole lot longer than plastics and only recently has cancer become epidemic. :)

    I think garlic has more benefits than risks for hormonally-based cancers; here's some information to add to the confusion:

    http://jn.nutrition.org/content/131/3/1058S.full
  • Tethys41
    Tethys41 Member Posts: 1,376 Member
    Flaxseed and DIM
    I asked my naturopath about the flaxseed issue today. She said that in the past it was thought to be estrogenic. She says now, however, it is thought to be beneficial, as it binds to excess estrogen and supplies the building blocks for it, if you are estrogen deficient. She uses quite a bit of it.

    Prior to taking a DIM supplement, you should have your 2:16 ratio tested, as this indicates how your body processes estrogen. If the ratio is out of balance, taking DIM can be detrimental.