cancer thoughts

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Patteee
Patteee Member Posts: 945
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
My oldest sister, age 53, was dx'd with stage 2 breast cancer last week. She had a port put in last week, will start chemo this week.

Feels like we have moved from a family with sporadic cancer to one infected with cancer. My brother had pre-cancer colon polyps removed last winter, my colon cancer and now my sister's breast cancer.

But really, it didn't start with this generation, it is just now hitting my generation.

My paternal great-grandmother and grandmother both died of breast cancer. A paternal Aunt had colon cancer (15 years clear now). Maternal grandmother died of leukemia, my mother has had breast cancer (15 years clear now).

Lots and lots WITHOUT cancer.

But as we get older, it seems more and more have this Beast. Lifestyles? Industrial polution? The price of living in the year 2010? What is in store for the next generation? For my children and grandchildren? Personally, I don't think we will conquer this Beast, only live with it as a chronic condition.

Comments

  • Nana b
    Nana b Member Posts: 3,030 Member
    Options
    We no longer consume the
    We no longer consume the healthy food of yesterday, to many preservatives these days. Fresh, frozen then canned.
  • AnneCan
    AnneCan Member Posts: 3,673 Member
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    Pateee
    I am sorry to hear your sister has been diagnosed with breast cancer. You have raised interesting questions. I do hope we can conquer this beast.
  • Lifeisajourney
    Lifeisajourney Member Posts: 216
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    cancer
    I lost my mother at 30 to breast cancer and I am now 67 diagnosed at 65 with stage 3 colon. I always worried about breast cancer even put my colonoscopy off 2 mos to have a breast biopsy which was neg. So now they want me to go early for a early diagn mammo for a check of a spot. Hopefully I'll be lucky again, but scares me to death.. but what I wonder most about cancer if why we see soo much of it. I am absolutely amazed at the younger people on this board that have been diagnosed and by young I mean under 50, I wonder if I have been under a rock till now, but so many people I have conversations with know someone with just colon problems. Breast cancer I have known many women with problems, but it seems like everyone has a connection to cancer anymore. Are we just getting diagnosed earlier, but then colon cancer is sooooo much more common now, along with other types of cancer. Were people living with cancer and not being treated before early diagnosis. I can count 5 first cousins with various cancers who have passed who were much younger than me and other close friends/relatives living with cancer. Sorry to be rambling but the whole cancer issue blows me away, why can't they find something to help us all other than the dreaded chemo. I guess I agree with John on his thoughts about pharmo issues and why we can't get them moving on it. Thanks for letting me vent. Pat
  • Left Coaster
    Left Coaster Member Posts: 25
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    cancer
    I lost my mother at 30 to breast cancer and I am now 67 diagnosed at 65 with stage 3 colon. I always worried about breast cancer even put my colonoscopy off 2 mos to have a breast biopsy which was neg. So now they want me to go early for a early diagn mammo for a check of a spot. Hopefully I'll be lucky again, but scares me to death.. but what I wonder most about cancer if why we see soo much of it. I am absolutely amazed at the younger people on this board that have been diagnosed and by young I mean under 50, I wonder if I have been under a rock till now, but so many people I have conversations with know someone with just colon problems. Breast cancer I have known many women with problems, but it seems like everyone has a connection to cancer anymore. Are we just getting diagnosed earlier, but then colon cancer is sooooo much more common now, along with other types of cancer. Were people living with cancer and not being treated before early diagnosis. I can count 5 first cousins with various cancers who have passed who were much younger than me and other close friends/relatives living with cancer. Sorry to be rambling but the whole cancer issue blows me away, why can't they find something to help us all other than the dreaded chemo. I guess I agree with John on his thoughts about pharmo issues and why we can't get them moving on it. Thanks for letting me vent. Pat

    Living with Cancer
    So wait, there is not a cure? It is interesting that you are so aware of all the possible causes of the cancer the world suffers from. As our society advances, so too does our abiity to detect disease. Some unintended consequences of these detection techniques include ... yup greater chance of developing cancer. So the double edged sword of checking for it and then monitoring it and then living with it have all improved over time. Different studies with different findings show different evidence for relationships between smoking and cancer, eating habits and cancer, all these things are enjoyable to an extent. So many different cancers with so many varied pathologies, it is no wonder that there is not a cure for cancer. Perhaps a philanthropist with nothing better to do with her money will contribute to a study that will focus on natural approaches to attempt to find a cure. It would be even better if this cure was say found in a blade of grass, no matter what the variety. Then we could all go green together and be healthy! :)

    Don't ever stop looking for a cure!
  • John23
    John23 Member Posts: 2,122 Member
    Options
    Causes and cures


    The problem is, that there's too much time and effort in trying to
    isolate the items that "cause cancer".

    The fact that a cancer cell is only a normal cell that (instead of dying),
    manages to live on by the fermentation process. It no longer is able
    to listen to the body's instructions regarding "how to behave", and
    survives like an amoeba, living on it's own, without instruction
    or direction.

    The immune system usually takes away the dead 1/2 cell when
    a normal cell splits, but if it doesn't..... that cell section might survive
    anyway instead of dying and getting carried off; Is there always
    an external cause?

    When normal cells get damaged by toxins, etc., they too, usually get
    taken away by the immune system..... But when they don't, and
    they manage to survive against all odds using fermentation to live,
    they are labeled: "cancer cells".

    So finding the external cause of cancer isn't as important as finding out
    why the immune system isn't doing what it was intended to do.

    Solve that, and you've cured cancer.

    My sour comments regarding chemo are due to the damaging effects
    those chemicals have on the immune system. How can the body fight
    cancer, if what they're giving you takes away your ability to fight?

    The "fight" becomes "Chemo vs Cancer", not "Me vs Cancer".

    The usual mantra about how one "put up a good fight against cancer",
    would be more aptly re-phrased to how one "put up a good fight
    against chemo" - since your body spends more energy fighting to get
    better from the treatments, than fighting the cancer.

    Yes, there is something dreadfully wrong with the picture, and
    continued support for an industry that has not swayed in 40 years
    from it's basic foundation of "cancer control", only perpetuates
    the wrong direction it's gone to.

    But then.... who would want to ruin a multi-billion dollar industry
    that keeps millions employed and billions of dollars in circulation?


    Just sayin'........


    Better days will come! In the meantime, do whatever it takes
    to stay alive in spite of these damned stubborn cells.

    "Whatever it takes".

    (just don't let the "cure" kill you)


    John
  • greybeard64
    greybeard64 Member Posts: 254
    Options
    John23 said:

    Causes and cures


    The problem is, that there's too much time and effort in trying to
    isolate the items that "cause cancer".

    The fact that a cancer cell is only a normal cell that (instead of dying),
    manages to live on by the fermentation process. It no longer is able
    to listen to the body's instructions regarding "how to behave", and
    survives like an amoeba, living on it's own, without instruction
    or direction.

    The immune system usually takes away the dead 1/2 cell when
    a normal cell splits, but if it doesn't..... that cell section might survive
    anyway instead of dying and getting carried off; Is there always
    an external cause?

    When normal cells get damaged by toxins, etc., they too, usually get
    taken away by the immune system..... But when they don't, and
    they manage to survive against all odds using fermentation to live,
    they are labeled: "cancer cells".

    So finding the external cause of cancer isn't as important as finding out
    why the immune system isn't doing what it was intended to do.

    Solve that, and you've cured cancer.

    My sour comments regarding chemo are due to the damaging effects
    those chemicals have on the immune system. How can the body fight
    cancer, if what they're giving you takes away your ability to fight?

    The "fight" becomes "Chemo vs Cancer", not "Me vs Cancer".

    The usual mantra about how one "put up a good fight against cancer",
    would be more aptly re-phrased to how one "put up a good fight
    against chemo" - since your body spends more energy fighting to get
    better from the treatments, than fighting the cancer.

    Yes, there is something dreadfully wrong with the picture, and
    continued support for an industry that has not swayed in 40 years
    from it's basic foundation of "cancer control", only perpetuates
    the wrong direction it's gone to.

    But then.... who would want to ruin a multi-billion dollar industry
    that keeps millions employed and billions of dollars in circulation?


    Just sayin'........


    Better days will come! In the meantime, do whatever it takes
    to stay alive in spite of these damned stubborn cells.

    "Whatever it takes".

    (just don't let the "cure" kill you)


    John

    I appreciate
    Your candor and your knowledge of alternative vs. western medicine when it comes to fighting this disease. I however doubt your sincerity about each of us "doing whatever it takes". All of the "just sayin'" comments seem to me to say otherwise. I am not finding fault with how you chose to take on this monster, I do believe to each his own.I admire your conviction, your drive to help others, it is a service to many.
    I would however ask that while you try to get your point across and continue to help others with your insight and opinions in regard to options to "traditional" means, that you guard against sounding condescending or judgemental towards those who chose the "standard route".

    I know it is not your intention, but I feel after reading your posts that because I took the "normal route" I have somehow hurt my chances of survival and removed myself from the equation when it comes to the fight.
    example:
    "The "fight" becomes "Chemo vs Cancer", not "Me vs Cancer".

    The usual mantra about how one "put up a good fight against cancer",
    would be more aptly re-phrased to how one "put up a good fight
    against chemo" - since your body spends more energy fighting to get
    better from the treatments, than fighting the cancer."



    I would like to repeat that I certainly appreciate your knowledge and conviction and it is nice to see the passion that comes through in each of your posts. More then once you have caused me to search other avenues and therefore increased my knowledge and added more weapons to my arsonal. Thanks for all you do and as always I
    hope this finds ya smilin'
    chris
  • coloCan
    coloCan Member Posts: 1,944 Member
    Options

    I appreciate
    Your candor and your knowledge of alternative vs. western medicine when it comes to fighting this disease. I however doubt your sincerity about each of us "doing whatever it takes". All of the "just sayin'" comments seem to me to say otherwise. I am not finding fault with how you chose to take on this monster, I do believe to each his own.I admire your conviction, your drive to help others, it is a service to many.
    I would however ask that while you try to get your point across and continue to help others with your insight and opinions in regard to options to "traditional" means, that you guard against sounding condescending or judgemental towards those who chose the "standard route".

    I know it is not your intention, but I feel after reading your posts that because I took the "normal route" I have somehow hurt my chances of survival and removed myself from the equation when it comes to the fight.
    example:
    "The "fight" becomes "Chemo vs Cancer", not "Me vs Cancer".

    The usual mantra about how one "put up a good fight against cancer",
    would be more aptly re-phrased to how one "put up a good fight
    against chemo" - since your body spends more energy fighting to get
    better from the treatments, than fighting the cancer."



    I would like to repeat that I certainly appreciate your knowledge and conviction and it is nice to see the passion that comes through in each of your posts. More then once you have caused me to search other avenues and therefore increased my knowledge and added more weapons to my arsonal. Thanks for all you do and as always I
    hope this finds ya smilin'
    chris

    I don;t think its the fault of the immune system that cancer can
    develop, grow, spread and kill so much as the sneakiness of the cancer itself to survive under the radar of the immune system, deceiving it; ignoring it to live off our body like the deadly parasite it is.The chemo/rad compromise our immune system while hopefully weakening and killing the cancer but we had cancer while our immune system was functioning properly....thats cancer's calling card-it evades our usual defenses.Solely my thoughts....steve
  • greybeard64
    greybeard64 Member Posts: 254
    Options
    Nana b said:

    We no longer consume the
    We no longer consume the healthy food of yesterday, to many preservatives these days. Fresh, frozen then canned.

    agree!
    I think that is a BIG part of it.
  • christinecarl
    christinecarl Member Posts: 543 Member
    Options
    Not sure
    There seems to be more incidents of colon cancer where I am from. Maybe I just notice them more, maybe it is in the soil. Who knows. I am sorry about all the cancer sh*t in your family. Why does it seem like when the sh*t hits the fan someone always has to turn the fan on high?
  • tootsie1
    tootsie1 Member Posts: 5,044 Member
    Options
    Sorry
    I'm really sorry about your sister. I pray she will get along well in her treatment.

    *hugs*
    Gail
  • John23
    John23 Member Posts: 2,122 Member
    Options
    coloCan said:

    I don;t think its the fault of the immune system that cancer can
    develop, grow, spread and kill so much as the sneakiness of the cancer itself to survive under the radar of the immune system, deceiving it; ignoring it to live off our body like the deadly parasite it is.The chemo/rad compromise our immune system while hopefully weakening and killing the cancer but we had cancer while our immune system was functioning properly....thats cancer's calling card-it evades our usual defenses.Solely my thoughts....steve

    Steve -



    Re:
    "I don;t think its the fault of the immune system that cancer can
    develop, grow, spread and kill so much as the sneakiness of the
    cancer itself to survive"


    The thought that a cancer cell is some sort of an infection that's
    managed to get inside us, is not the way it actually is.

    A cancer cell is just a damaged plain ol' cell. It can't receive instructions
    from the body regarding survival, so it begins using the fermentation
    process to stay alive. It's really that simple.

    That cancer cell has no "brain" or intellect; it can't outmaneuver an
    attacker, it's just surviving on it's own. The reason it seems so elusive,
    is because initially it looks like the rest of the normal cells; it was
    a normal cell.

    Initially, a cancer cell doesn't use more glucose than a normal cell, so
    modern technology can't "see" it, and modern medicine can't isolate it
    or identify it as a rogue cell.

    So the problem really is: an immune system that's ignoring a cell
    that's managing to survive on it's own.

    There's a lot of speculation regarding why a person's immune system
    isn't attacking the damaged cell (and removing it), but so far, there
    isn't anything on the market to address that problem. (Trovax came close)

    It's great that chemo, or herbs, or anything else can kill a cancer cell,
    but unless we can get the immune system to do it, we'll always be
    in peril of a cell gone rogue.

    I hope I didn't insult anyone this time? It's a touchy subject, but facing
    facts and understanding the problem can eventually go a long way to
    finally resolve the problem.

    Have courage and lose the fear..... don't stare directly into the sun.

    We all can live a full life, in spite of cancer.


    John.
  • kristasplace
    kristasplace Member Posts: 957 Member
    Options
    Causes of cancer
    Hi Patty! I'm of the very strong belief that it's important we know how we got our cancer. I said this one other time a while back, and someone really got down on me for it. She said it didn't matter how she got it, she just wanted to get rid of it. Knowing what caused it could help us fight it, and keep us from getting it again. If you listen to Dr. Weil, he believes stress is the main factor for so many people getting cancer. In my case, that is very true, but i believe diet is a high one up there too. Let's face it, many of us eat a typical Western diet. And we all know how healthless that is! I can't help but notice all the stories of cancer survival revolving around a purely healthful diet. Both the stress factor, and the food factor affect the immunne system greater than anything else, and without a strong immune system, any number of things can get us. I so totally agree with John on that. It's one of the big reasons i'm refusing chemo. Another big reason is that i don't see it curing anyone.

    My best wishes for your sis, Patty. I'm sure she'll beat her beast!

    Hugs,
    Krista
  • John23
    John23 Member Posts: 2,122 Member
    Options

    I appreciate
    Your candor and your knowledge of alternative vs. western medicine when it comes to fighting this disease. I however doubt your sincerity about each of us "doing whatever it takes". All of the "just sayin'" comments seem to me to say otherwise. I am not finding fault with how you chose to take on this monster, I do believe to each his own.I admire your conviction, your drive to help others, it is a service to many.
    I would however ask that while you try to get your point across and continue to help others with your insight and opinions in regard to options to "traditional" means, that you guard against sounding condescending or judgemental towards those who chose the "standard route".

    I know it is not your intention, but I feel after reading your posts that because I took the "normal route" I have somehow hurt my chances of survival and removed myself from the equation when it comes to the fight.
    example:
    "The "fight" becomes "Chemo vs Cancer", not "Me vs Cancer".

    The usual mantra about how one "put up a good fight against cancer",
    would be more aptly re-phrased to how one "put up a good fight
    against chemo" - since your body spends more energy fighting to get
    better from the treatments, than fighting the cancer."



    I would like to repeat that I certainly appreciate your knowledge and conviction and it is nice to see the passion that comes through in each of your posts. More then once you have caused me to search other avenues and therefore increased my knowledge and added more weapons to my arsonal. Thanks for all you do and as always I
    hope this finds ya smilin'
    chris

    Chris -

    Re:
    "I know it is not your intention, but I feel after reading your posts
    that because I took the "normal route" I have somehow hurt my chances
    of survival and removed myself from the equation when it comes to the fight."


    You're right, that wasn't what I had desired to imply at all! Sometimes
    my thoughts don't fare as well in print as they do in my noggin'. (herb-fog ?)

    The last thing I care to do, is make any fellow cancer victim look back at
    what they've done, and regret it. We all do what we feel we need to do,
    and we should -never- look back to speculate the "what ifs".

    I could find cancer has spread inside me tomorrow, since cancer is cancer,
    and we can't predict our future with it, regardless of our path to fight it.

    I personally find it difficult to be judgmental, so if that's the way
    I'm playing out, I had better take more care with the way I type.

    It's difficult to speak out about the perils of western medicine, when
    so many depend on it religiously. But I'll try to do my best.....

    Unlike religion.... medical practices should never be believed in with
    blind faith. We all want to survive in spite of cancer, but we shouldn't
    allow ourselves to take remedies, or to continue taking remedies that
    we find are doing us more harm than good. When we see a remedy not
    working for us, we shouldn't allow the fear of stopping to force us to
    continue damaging ourselves.

    Abandoning a treatment is a difficult choice, but not making a choice
    out of the fear that it might be a wrong choice, can kill us; the benefits
    have to be weighed against the risks.

    The chemicals used in "chemo", and the radiation that's used for
    radiation treatments, can do serious harm to our immune system.
    It's something that no physician, patient, scientist, or biologist will
    ever deny happens.

    Chemo and radiation do not discriminate between good cells
    and bad cells. They may be coming close to narrowing down the
    ability to target cancer cells specifically; soon, I hope.

    But the toxins of the chemicals still damages the liver, kidney, and
    digestive tract, and those organs is where our immune system is built.

    In many, many other countries, both TCM and Western Medicine
    are used together to make sure that whatever damage the immune
    system suffers during chemo/rad, is restored as quickly as possible
    using the sciences of TCM.

    My comment that a chemo patient's body spends more energy
    fighting the ravages of chemo or rad than cancer, is about as
    accurate as it can get; it's the very reason both sciences are used
    together in many other countries (and with great success).

    Chemo and radiation can shrink a tumor faster than most other
    alternatives, and there are times that it's absolutely necessary
    to stop the growth as fast as possible. And of course, Chemo can
    get to areas that a knife cannot, making it a -very- viable choice.

    So please don't misunderstand my dislike for chemo and radiation,
    they have their place, and can be the -only- methods to do the job in
    many instances. Lives have been saved with chemo and radiation.

    No-one "ruins their chances" of survival by doing chemo, unless their
    body becomes so ravaged by the harsh toxic chemicals, that their body
    becomes too weak to battle much else than the ravages of the chemicals.

    Chemo and radiation can be a necessary evil, but one has to know
    when enough is enough. Disregarding one's own body's demands
    for a break because one fears a possible dismal outcome, is a poor
    excuse to continue beating up one's body until it can't take it anymore.

    We get healthy when our body is working properly, so it's very
    important to get the immune system built to it's peak.

    It's not a "wrong choice" to do chemo or radiation, but all the
    other options should be taken as seriously.

    I very truly want everyone to stay alive for a long, long time.

    But for me, reading about so, so many that continue taking treatments
    that they find have begun to fail them unmercifully, instead of abandoning
    that path and trying something else, -or at least- trying an alternative
    -along with- what they're doing, is difficult to comprehend.

    With such a strong will to live, why hold so much blind faith to -any-
    treatment, especially if the cancer is getting worse, rather than better?

    It doesn't matter if it's Chemo, Radiation, TCM or Panama Red,
    if it ceases to work, change the plan.

    "Like an old toaster: If it ceases to work, toss it out."


    Thanks for the note, Chris!

    Better health to all.

    John
  • abmb
    abmb Member Posts: 311
    Options
    Nana b said:

    We no longer consume the
    We no longer consume the healthy food of yesterday, to many preservatives these days. Fresh, frozen then canned.

    I agree
    I do agree with your statement. I do believe we live in a world of too much processed food with too many preservatives. Makes me want to start canning, making our own bread, but how far can we actually go. somethings I will still have to purchase and those items will have preservatives. It is a fast paced world we now live in. Margaret
  • HollyID
    HollyID Member Posts: 946 Member
    Options
    It wasn't too long ago that I took my daughter
    to see my surgeon because she was having bowel problems, herself. This was approximately 4 months after I'd had my surgery. Well, when Aubrey was out of the room, he'd told me he doesn't believe that doing a colonoscopy on her was such a bad idea since he'd just diagnosed colon cancer on a 26 year old a few days earlier. My daughter is 25 and given my history of cc, it was a wise choice. When I asked him why, we did came up with an answer of processed foods. This kid was an athlete, in very good shape. Not a lot of body fat, a good student, but when you're a student, you're usually stressed a bit, right? I think so, plus the kid ate pretty much nothing but fast food. Taco Bell, McDonald's, BK and Dairy Queen. To me, that's just NASTY!!

    Her colon was "Clean as a whistle" as he said and she'll have to have a follow up scope in 8 years, which is about 15 years before I was diagnosed.
  • greybeard64
    greybeard64 Member Posts: 254
    Options
    John23 said:

    Chris -

    Re:
    "I know it is not your intention, but I feel after reading your posts
    that because I took the "normal route" I have somehow hurt my chances
    of survival and removed myself from the equation when it comes to the fight."


    You're right, that wasn't what I had desired to imply at all! Sometimes
    my thoughts don't fare as well in print as they do in my noggin'. (herb-fog ?)

    The last thing I care to do, is make any fellow cancer victim look back at
    what they've done, and regret it. We all do what we feel we need to do,
    and we should -never- look back to speculate the "what ifs".

    I could find cancer has spread inside me tomorrow, since cancer is cancer,
    and we can't predict our future with it, regardless of our path to fight it.

    I personally find it difficult to be judgmental, so if that's the way
    I'm playing out, I had better take more care with the way I type.

    It's difficult to speak out about the perils of western medicine, when
    so many depend on it religiously. But I'll try to do my best.....

    Unlike religion.... medical practices should never be believed in with
    blind faith. We all want to survive in spite of cancer, but we shouldn't
    allow ourselves to take remedies, or to continue taking remedies that
    we find are doing us more harm than good. When we see a remedy not
    working for us, we shouldn't allow the fear of stopping to force us to
    continue damaging ourselves.

    Abandoning a treatment is a difficult choice, but not making a choice
    out of the fear that it might be a wrong choice, can kill us; the benefits
    have to be weighed against the risks.

    The chemicals used in "chemo", and the radiation that's used for
    radiation treatments, can do serious harm to our immune system.
    It's something that no physician, patient, scientist, or biologist will
    ever deny happens.

    Chemo and radiation do not discriminate between good cells
    and bad cells. They may be coming close to narrowing down the
    ability to target cancer cells specifically; soon, I hope.

    But the toxins of the chemicals still damages the liver, kidney, and
    digestive tract, and those organs is where our immune system is built.

    In many, many other countries, both TCM and Western Medicine
    are used together to make sure that whatever damage the immune
    system suffers during chemo/rad, is restored as quickly as possible
    using the sciences of TCM.

    My comment that a chemo patient's body spends more energy
    fighting the ravages of chemo or rad than cancer, is about as
    accurate as it can get; it's the very reason both sciences are used
    together in many other countries (and with great success).

    Chemo and radiation can shrink a tumor faster than most other
    alternatives, and there are times that it's absolutely necessary
    to stop the growth as fast as possible. And of course, Chemo can
    get to areas that a knife cannot, making it a -very- viable choice.

    So please don't misunderstand my dislike for chemo and radiation,
    they have their place, and can be the -only- methods to do the job in
    many instances. Lives have been saved with chemo and radiation.

    No-one "ruins their chances" of survival by doing chemo, unless their
    body becomes so ravaged by the harsh toxic chemicals, that their body
    becomes too weak to battle much else than the ravages of the chemicals.

    Chemo and radiation can be a necessary evil, but one has to know
    when enough is enough. Disregarding one's own body's demands
    for a break because one fears a possible dismal outcome, is a poor
    excuse to continue beating up one's body until it can't take it anymore.

    We get healthy when our body is working properly, so it's very
    important to get the immune system built to it's peak.

    It's not a "wrong choice" to do chemo or radiation, but all the
    other options should be taken as seriously.

    I very truly want everyone to stay alive for a long, long time.

    But for me, reading about so, so many that continue taking treatments
    that they find have begun to fail them unmercifully, instead of abandoning
    that path and trying something else, -or at least- trying an alternative
    -along with- what they're doing, is difficult to comprehend.

    With such a strong will to live, why hold so much blind faith to -any-
    treatment, especially if the cancer is getting worse, rather than better?

    It doesn't matter if it's Chemo, Radiation, TCM or Panama Red,
    if it ceases to work, change the plan.

    "Like an old toaster: If it ceases to work, toss it out."


    Thanks for the note, Chris!

    Better health to all.

    John

    thank you
    I am glad you responded so positively to my post, I like you am not looking to hurt anyone and it was nice to see that I was succesful. I thought, from what I have seen you post, you would understand and I am so glad I was right. keep fighting the good fight and helping others with your insight. Your a wonderful source of info for many.
    thanks
    and as always hope this finds ya smilin'
    chris
  • greybeard64
    greybeard64 Member Posts: 254
    Options
    HollyID said:

    It wasn't too long ago that I took my daughter
    to see my surgeon because she was having bowel problems, herself. This was approximately 4 months after I'd had my surgery. Well, when Aubrey was out of the room, he'd told me he doesn't believe that doing a colonoscopy on her was such a bad idea since he'd just diagnosed colon cancer on a 26 year old a few days earlier. My daughter is 25 and given my history of cc, it was a wise choice. When I asked him why, we did came up with an answer of processed foods. This kid was an athlete, in very good shape. Not a lot of body fat, a good student, but when you're a student, you're usually stressed a bit, right? I think so, plus the kid ate pretty much nothing but fast food. Taco Bell, McDonald's, BK and Dairy Queen. To me, that's just NASTY!!

    Her colon was "Clean as a whistle" as he said and she'll have to have a follow up scope in 8 years, which is about 15 years before I was diagnosed.

    Happy for you
    and your daughter, "clean as a whistle", must have sounded pretty darn welcome to your ears and hers! I agree that stress and diet play a big part in our general health and most certainly with cancer. This run as fast as you can pace we live in, the preservatives and chemicals they use in producing and preserving the food we eat, combined with a sedintary lifestyle is just bad news all the way around.
    chris