Uterine Carcinosarcoma, any survivors out there?

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  • jazzy1
    jazzy1 Member Posts: 1,379
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    oshbgosh said:

    I stay away from dairy now

    I stay away from dairy now for the most part if I do have any it is organic same with my meat or anything I eat. I make my own soaps and lotions from organic products. My Kangan water machine has a setting for a low ph for cleaning and a high ph for drinking. Organic foods have no chemicales or pestacides, taste so much better but are much more spendy. I will be putting in my own organic garden this year. It is now away of life for me. No microwave, no plastic. I do take vitamine B17, I know is not sold in the U.S. but  here in Alaska we have a little law that alows for the sale of B17 so I can buy it from the health food store. I think the fresh weatgrass juice and the water are the two most important things I take, I also eat alot of live foods. Just kind of have to go backwards like thing use to be years ago befor all this crap has been done to our food. By eating organic you do not get the hormones and crap injected into the animals to make them GROW FAST. Same with fruits and vegetables organic has not been modified. When fruits and vegetables have been geniticly modified they lost some very important things that our bodys need.

    Yes I did meen 2012. And no cancer was found any place else.

    Everyone has cancer in there body but only some of us have it go haywire and I do beleive it happens when our body ph is to low. Just pee on a ph strip and you will know what your ph is.

    I do it almost everytime so I can keep it in check. The first one in the morning is the most important one and the hardest one to get corected.

    I just herd from DR. Oz show that a low dose asprin a day helps keep cancer away so I have added that to my daily routine good for the heart also.

     

    Great Information

    There's a lot of good topic threads on here from past years.  Suggest hitting the search button at the top and enter your topic of choice.  

     

    Points below I find of interest --Wink

     

      • Avoid sugar, especially fructose. All forms of sugar are detrimental to health in general and promote cancer. Fructose, however, is clearly one of the most harmful and should be avoided as much as possible.
      • Optimize your vitamin D. Vitamin D influences virtually every cell in your body and is one of nature's most potent cancer fighters. Vitamin D is actually able to enter cancer cells and trigger apoptosis (cell death). If you have cancer, your vitamin D level should be between 70 and 100 ng/ml. Vitamin D works synergistically with every cancer treatment I'm aware of, with no adverse effects. I suggest you try watching my one-hour free lecture on vitamin D to learn more.
      • Limit your protein. Newer research has emphasized the importance of the mTOR pathways. When these are active, cancer growth is accelerated. The best way to quiet this pathway is by limiting your protein to one gram of protein per kilogram of lean body weight, or roughly a bit less than half a gram of protein per every pound of lean body weight. For most people this ranges between 40 and 70 grams of protein a day, which is about 2/3 to half of what they are currently eating.
      • Avoid unfermented soy productsUnfermented soy is high in plant estrogens, or phytoestrogens, also known as isoflavones. In some studies, soy appears to work in concert with human estrogen to increase breast cell proliferation, which increases the chances for mutations and cancerous cells.
      • Improve your insulin and leptin receptor sensitivity. The best way to do this is by avoiding sugar and grains and restricting carbs to mostly fiber vegetables. Also making sure you are exercising, especially with Peak Fitness.
      • Maintain a healthy body weight. This will come naturally when you begin eating right for your nutritional type and exercising. It's important to lose excess body fat because fat produces estrogen.
      • Drink a pint to a quart of organic green vegetable juice daily. Please review my juicing instructions for more detailed information.
      • Get plenty of high quality animal-based omega-3 fats, such as krill oilOmega-3 deficiency is a common underlying factor for cancer.
      • Curcumin. This is the active ingredient in turmeric and in high concentrations can be very useful adjunct in the treatment of cancer. For example, it has demonstrated major therapeutic potential in preventing breast cancer metastasis.9 It's important to know that curcumin is generally not absorbed that well, so I've provided several absorption tips here.
      • Avoid drinking alcohol, or at least limit your alcoholic drinks to one per day.
      • Avoid electromagnetic fields as much as possible. Even electric blankets can increase your cancer risk.
      • Avoid synthetic hormone replacement therapy, especially if you have risk factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer is an estrogen-related cancer, and according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, breast cancer rates for women dropped in tandem with decreased use of hormone replacement therapy. (There are similar risks for younger women who use oral contraceptives. Birth control pills, which are also comprised of synthetic hormones, have been linked to cervical and breast cancers.)

    If you are experiencing excessive menopausal symptoms, you may want to consider bioidentical hormone replacement therapy instead, which uses hormones that are molecularly identical to the ones your body produces and do not wreak havoc on your system. This is a much safer alternative.

      • Avoid BPA, phthalates and other xenoestrogens. These are estrogen-like compounds that have been linked to increased breast cancer risk
      • Make sure you're not iodine deficient, as there's compelling evidence linking iodine deficiency with certain forms of cancer. Dr. David Brownstein10, author of the book Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can't Live Without It, is a proponent of iodine for breast cancer. It actually has potent anticancer properties and has been shown to cause cell death in breast and thyroid cancer cells.

    For more information, I recommend reading Dr. Brownstein's book. I have been researching iodine for some time ever since I interviewed Dr. Brownstein as I do believe that the bulk of what he states is spot on. However, I am not at all convinced that his dosage recommendations are correct. I believe they are too high.

    • Avoid charring your meats. Charcoal or flame broiled meat is linked with increased breast cancer risk. Acrylamide—a carcinogen created when starchy foods are baked, roasted or fried—has been found to increase cancer risk as well.
  • KU68
    KU68 Member Posts: 1
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    carcinosarcome mom 78 yrs old

    Hello,

    My mom was recently diagnosed with uterine carcinosarcoma, they did a total hysterectomy (uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes) removal of lymph nodes in pelvic area, uterus contained a tumor the size of an orange. At time of surgery they discovered cancer in fatty tissue around small intestine and bladder. They are doing an ultrasound today to see what they found in the mammogram after surgery in her breast. Tomorrow discussion of next step (chemo only, as radiation not an option) I have been reading on the internet to find out how serious this is, and I am reading a lot of various opinions. Looking for brutal honesty,,,,Can anyone help me? I am a concerned daughter of a 78 yr old mom who is in the midst of life changing stuff. Please and thank you.

    ~KU68

  • Ddkos
    Ddkos Member Posts: 2
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    KU68 said:

    carcinosarcome mom 78 yrs old

    Hello,

    My mom was recently diagnosed with uterine carcinosarcoma, they did a total hysterectomy (uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes) removal of lymph nodes in pelvic area, uterus contained a tumor the size of an orange. At time of surgery they discovered cancer in fatty tissue around small intestine and bladder. They are doing an ultrasound today to see what they found in the mammogram after surgery in her breast. Tomorrow discussion of next step (chemo only, as radiation not an option) I have been reading on the internet to find out how serious this is, and I am reading a lot of various opinions. Looking for brutal honesty,,,,Can anyone help me? I am a concerned daughter of a 78 yr old mom who is in the midst of life changing stuff. Please and thank you.

    ~KU68

    Uterine carcinomasarcona

    I was diagnosed with IIIB in October 2008.   Statistics certainly didn't look good, but I stayed upbeat.  Went through complete hysterectomy with taxol and carboplatin for six chemo treatments and then a month of external radiation plus a couple internal.   Cells were present in the body wash, mostly single but some in clumps of two or three.   Cancer had spread into vagina so portion of that had been removed as well.  I continued exercise--teaching line dancing five hours a week--all through treatment.  Just had my CA125 test last week, and number remains in the teens.  CT scans have been every six months but am now on an annual achedule.  I am so thankful.  I did not change diet or do any drastic supplements, etc,  did use B1and B6 during treatment.  Chemo has side effects, as does radiation, but I don't think I would be here if I hadn't followed the regimen my wonderful oncologist set for me!  I hit a huge milestone this year--70!

     

  • ConnieSW
    ConnieSW Member Posts: 1,688 Member
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    Ddkos said:

    Uterine carcinomasarcona

    I was diagnosed with IIIB in October 2008.   Statistics certainly didn't look good, but I stayed upbeat.  Went through complete hysterectomy with taxol and carboplatin for six chemo treatments and then a month of external radiation plus a couple internal.   Cells were present in the body wash, mostly single but some in clumps of two or three.   Cancer had spread into vagina so portion of that had been removed as well.  I continued exercise--teaching line dancing five hours a week--all through treatment.  Just had my CA125 test last week, and number remains in the teens.  CT scans have been every six months but am now on an annual achedule.  I am so thankful.  I did not change diet or do any drastic supplements, etc,  did use B1and B6 during treatment.  Chemo has side effects, as does radiation, but I don't think I would be here if I hadn't followed the regimen my wonderful oncologist set for me!  I hit a huge milestone this year--70!

     

    Here's to another 5 years

    And then 5 more, and another 5 and........

  • DrienneB
    DrienneB Member Posts: 182
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    Ddkos said:

    Uterine carcinomasarcona

    I was diagnosed with IIIB in October 2008.   Statistics certainly didn't look good, but I stayed upbeat.  Went through complete hysterectomy with taxol and carboplatin for six chemo treatments and then a month of external radiation plus a couple internal.   Cells were present in the body wash, mostly single but some in clumps of two or three.   Cancer had spread into vagina so portion of that had been removed as well.  I continued exercise--teaching line dancing five hours a week--all through treatment.  Just had my CA125 test last week, and number remains in the teens.  CT scans have been every six months but am now on an annual achedule.  I am so thankful.  I did not change diet or do any drastic supplements, etc,  did use B1and B6 during treatment.  Chemo has side effects, as does radiation, but I don't think I would be here if I hadn't followed the regimen my wonderful oncologist set for me!  I hit a huge milestone this year--70!

     

    Congrats and Thanks for Posting!

    Wow, I'm encouraged. You sailed through your treatments and are still going strong almost 5 years later. Happy 70th!!

  • cleo
    cleo Member Posts: 144
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    Stay encouraged!!

    Don't read the negative stats.   Stage 3/4 August 2007..uterus/bladder/lymph glands.  At the grand old age of knocking on 73 have just welcomed a first grandchild!!! [ Yes we are a traditionally late starter family!!]   She is well worth hanging around for.    Stay positive.

  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471 Member
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    Ddkos said:

    Uterine carcinomasarcona

    I was diagnosed with IIIB in October 2008.   Statistics certainly didn't look good, but I stayed upbeat.  Went through complete hysterectomy with taxol and carboplatin for six chemo treatments and then a month of external radiation plus a couple internal.   Cells were present in the body wash, mostly single but some in clumps of two or three.   Cancer had spread into vagina so portion of that had been removed as well.  I continued exercise--teaching line dancing five hours a week--all through treatment.  Just had my CA125 test last week, and number remains in the teens.  CT scans have been every six months but am now on an annual achedule.  I am so thankful.  I did not change diet or do any drastic supplements, etc,  did use B1and B6 during treatment.  Chemo has side effects, as does radiation, but I don't think I would be here if I hadn't followed the regimen my wonderful oncologist set for me!  I hit a huge milestone this year--70!

     

    No Change of DIET?

     

    Dear Ddkos,

     

    Congratulations on five years NED after diagnosis at a fairly advanced stage of this tumor!

     

    What most fascinates me about your message is your claim that  you didn't change anything about your diet or do "drastic supplements."

     

    May I ask what your typical diet HAD been that you didn't change?  (Vegetarian--or not?  Lots of sugary snacks--or not?  Any alcohol--or not?)  Many of us, based on some recent research, nearly obsess about what we're eating and drinking.

     

    Thanks,

    Rosey

  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471 Member
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    cleo said:

    Stay encouraged!!

    Don't read the negative stats.   Stage 3/4 August 2007..uterus/bladder/lymph glands.  At the grand old age of knocking on 73 have just welcomed a first grandchild!!! [ Yes we are a traditionally late starter family!!]   She is well worth hanging around for.    Stay positive.

    Very Encouraging, Cleo!

     

    Cleo,

     

    Have been off the boards for past year--job is really consuming--but will now check in every few weeks.  Am so happy to see how you're still thriving six years after diagnosis.

     

    Congratulations!  Did you do chemo and radiation?  And have you been carefully watching your diet--or living as you did before diagnosis?  Exercise?

     

    We'd love to know any clues to your longterm NED status!

     

    Warmly,

    Rosey

     

  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471 Member
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    DrienneB said:

    Congrats and Thanks for Posting!

    Wow, I'm encouraged. You sailed through your treatments and are still going strong almost 5 years later. Happy 70th!!

    More Encouragement

     

    Dreienne,

     

    Was on the CSN boards a lot during first year of treatment for Stage IB MMMT uterine cancer; if you scroll back through MMMT messages, you'll see posts from me, "RoseyR."

    After six rounds of taxol/carboplatin and 25 pelvic radiation sessions, I am feeling great three years since diagnosis and two years since end of treatment.  The main residual effect of treatment, which caused me NO side effects beyond lost hair, has been low white counts; am still struggling to bring them up.

    Since you had asked on another thread of discussion what we could all do to minimize recurrence, I'd recommend books such as Anti-Cancer by Dr. David S. Schreiber: a fantastically researched and upbeat book on how he prolonged his own remission by a decade simply by attention to what he was eating. 

    Also assume you're watching your Vitamin D levels, which should be between 50-70, according to much research.  (Liquid D is much more absorbable than capsules, by the way).

    I wonder if your blood has been checked for levels of copper and iron (ferritin) because we also want them, as cancer patients, to be reasonably LOW.  (Transfusions can raise ferritin levels which ideally shouldn't be above 100 and copper ideally lower than your blood serum level of zinc.   Why?  Copper and iron both fuel angiogenesis--cancer spread.  Even if you take a multi-vitamin, make it Formula 950--without copper and iron, specially devised for cancer patients.

    Although I don't want to cause undue worry, I also see from  your photo that you are a beautiful redhead.  If it's natural, great; if you're coloring it at a salon, or with anything but a natural henna product such as Light Mountain (avaiable online), you may be getting a high dose of copper in the product.   High-copper foods include regular tea, chocolate, and shellfish of any kind.

    I've also read that if we drink a little red wine, those highest in copper are the European varieties, so stay away from French, German, Austrian wines in favor of Spanish, Argentinian, and Italian wines, lower in copper.  Spanish and Sardinian red wines have also been found to lower our blood levels of estrogen--so since many of our tumors ARE homrally driven, you might want to stick to these wines if you drink in moderation.

     What I'd do were I you is have my blood levels of copper, zinc, and ferritin checked at least twice a year; if zinc is high normal and copper is low normal or lower than normal, that's good; but if copper is medium high to high, you might want to watch red dyes and chocolate (often made in copper pots), shellfish, and black teas.  I am hopiong green tea is far lower in copper as it is SO good for us as cancer patients but am still having trouble finding definitive information online.

    Hope you're feeling well.  Stay optimistic and enjoy every small pleasure you can: good for the immune system!  Taking curcumin (500mgs x 3 a day with meals) will also keep inflammation minimal.

    Best,

    Rosey

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • cleo
    cleo Member Posts: 144
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    RoseyR said:

    Very Encouraging, Cleo!

     

    Cleo,

     

    Have been off the boards for past year--job is really consuming--but will now check in every few weeks.  Am so happy to see how you're still thriving six years after diagnosis.

     

    Congratulations!  Did you do chemo and radiation?  And have you been carefully watching your diet--or living as you did before diagnosis?  Exercise?

     

    We'd love to know any clues to your longterm NED status!

     

    Warmly,

    Rosey

     

    Hi Rosey

    Wondered where you were. Pleased to hear all well.  I also watch but get really annoyed when I see that statistics have been quoted to people  - I then go into print!

    Radiotherapy only..as told that  if chemo necessary would be palliative only for me. [don't live in the states so treatment may differ]   I started off by eating broccoli etc but soon reverted to usual diet and life as per.   Consider that I have always tried to lead a healthy lifestyle.   Don't like meat but don't consider myself a vegetarian.  Don't have a sweet tooth. Don't smoke or drink [just don't like the taste]    I was furious when told by a nurse of all people how lucky I was to be able to 'get my house in order' and decided that there was no way that I was going to be second best in this..and so far....

  • elh050885
    elh050885 Member Posts: 2
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    My Mom has just been diagnosed

    My Mom has just been diagnosed with carcinosarcoma. There has been a lot of waiting to get information. Her regular Dr just reffered her to a specialist in Indianapolis, which close to where we live. She hasn't gotten much information about it yet.

    I of course, looked it up once we got a name, and needless to say was taken back by the severity of it. She does not know how bad it could be, since she has not seen the specialist yet..... and I can't tell her.

    We don't have a stage yet. She started have bleeding a month and a half ago. She had the procedure to have the abnormal tissue from her uterus removed and biopsied. At the time the Dr was quite optomistic that it had not spread and a hysterectomy would be all that was likely needed. This was before finding out what kind it was.

    I'm really not sure what I'm asking for here, just thought I would look for people that have gone through this.

    Thanks

  • elh050885
    elh050885 Member Posts: 2
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    elh050885 said:

    My Mom has just been diagnosed

    My Mom has just been diagnosed with carcinosarcoma. There has been a lot of waiting to get information. Her regular Dr just reffered her to a specialist in Indianapolis, which close to where we live. She hasn't gotten much information about it yet.

    I of course, looked it up once we got a name, and needless to say was taken back by the severity of it. She does not know how bad it could be, since she has not seen the specialist yet..... and I can't tell her.

    We don't have a stage yet. She started have bleeding a month and a half ago. She had the procedure to have the abnormal tissue from her uterus removed and biopsied. At the time the Dr was quite optomistic that it had not spread and a hysterectomy would be all that was likely needed. This was before finding out what kind it was.

    I'm really not sure what I'm asking for here, just thought I would look for people that have gone through this.

    Thanks

    I forgot to add-
    She is 63,

    I forgot to add-

    She is 63, and not in very good physical shape. She has worked very hard as a nurse, and is close to retiring. She wants to be able to go back to work asap, because she doesn't want to loose everything as far as benefits, retirment ect. I've told her not to count on that any time soon, seeing that people with this typically have to have chemo and radiation.

    Has anyone been able to continue working through this, after recovery from the hysterectomy?

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,447 Member
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    elh050885 said:

    My Mom has just been diagnosed

    My Mom has just been diagnosed with carcinosarcoma. There has been a lot of waiting to get information. Her regular Dr just reffered her to a specialist in Indianapolis, which close to where we live. She hasn't gotten much information about it yet.

    I of course, looked it up once we got a name, and needless to say was taken back by the severity of it. She does not know how bad it could be, since she has not seen the specialist yet..... and I can't tell her.

    We don't have a stage yet. She started have bleeding a month and a half ago. She had the procedure to have the abnormal tissue from her uterus removed and biopsied. At the time the Dr was quite optomistic that it had not spread and a hysterectomy would be all that was likely needed. This was before finding out what kind it was.

    I'm really not sure what I'm asking for here, just thought I would look for people that have gone through this.

    Thanks

    I am also in Indy

    I suspect she was referred to a gyn/onc in Indianapolis and they will probably want the sample analyzed by thier own pathogist.  I live in Indy and was dx with UPSC so there are really good doctors here!  She may/may not need any treatment outside of surgery, but she will find out. 

    The nursing job can be very physically demanding, so work?  not sure what she does. 

    I had a complete hysterectomy and a TON of lymph node samples!  I was out for two weeks and promised I would go back part time after that due to all the samples.

    BE SURE she asks if there is anything to minimize lymphedemia after surgery!!!  I wish I had been given advice from someone to even TRY and avoid it.   

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,447 Member
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    KU68 said:

    carcinosarcome mom 78 yrs old

    Hello,

    My mom was recently diagnosed with uterine carcinosarcoma, they did a total hysterectomy (uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes) removal of lymph nodes in pelvic area, uterus contained a tumor the size of an orange. At time of surgery they discovered cancer in fatty tissue around small intestine and bladder. They are doing an ultrasound today to see what they found in the mammogram after surgery in her breast. Tomorrow discussion of next step (chemo only, as radiation not an option) I have been reading on the internet to find out how serious this is, and I am reading a lot of various opinions. Looking for brutal honesty,,,,Can anyone help me? I am a concerned daughter of a 78 yr old mom who is in the midst of life changing stuff. Please and thank you.

    ~KU68

    Honestly? Everyone is different

    KU68,

    I would bet that no two people or cancers are exactly the same.  The first thing anyone here would recommend is that you go to a gynecological oncologist.  They specialize in cancer of the gynecological nature and are the doctors to be treating her.  

    The internet can be a scary place, so be careful of some of the things that you find, but the women here will help. 

    My two cents:

    Take it one step at a time. There are many hurdles with cancer, and there will be tough days in there, but there are plenty of us out here who have made the journey and can "electronically" hold both your hands.

    Personally, I am always lifted up by the stories of the women who have had later stages gynecological cancers and are sharing their news.  ANYTHING is possible!  Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, give up.

  • treezee
    treezee Member Posts: 4
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    Honestly? Everyone is different

    KU68,

    I would bet that no two people or cancers are exactly the same.  The first thing anyone here would recommend is that you go to a gynecological oncologist.  They specialize in cancer of the gynecological nature and are the doctors to be treating her.  

    The internet can be a scary place, so be careful of some of the things that you find, but the women here will help. 

    My two cents:

    Take it one step at a time. There are many hurdles with cancer, and there will be tough days in there, but there are plenty of us out here who have made the journey and can "electronically" hold both your hands.

    Personally, I am always lifted up by the stories of the women who have had later stages gynecological cancers and are sharing their news.  ANYTHING is possible!  Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, give up.

    thanks NoTimeForCancer needed

    thanks NoTimeForCancer needed a pick me up right now

  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471 Member
    Options
    elh050885 said:

    I forgot to add-
    She is 63,

    I forgot to add-

    She is 63, and not in very good physical shape. She has worked very hard as a nurse, and is close to retiring. She wants to be able to go back to work asap, because she doesn't want to loose everything as far as benefits, retirment ect. I've told her not to count on that any time soon, seeing that people with this typically have to have chemo and radiation.

    Has anyone been able to continue working through this, after recovery from the hysterectomy?

    working during chemo

     

    I found carboplatin and taxol (six rounds of it) did NOT make me very sick at all so COULD HAVE WORKED during chemo except for times when my white blood counts were so low that I could have caught a flu or cold too easily.

     

    What I'd advise your mom is to see an INTEGRATIVE doctors before chemo who will presribe things to protect her against it: 

     

    I was prescribed the following:

     

    fish oil (Finest Pure Fish Oil by Pharmax), 4 tsps a day after meals.

     

    ProGreens (one scoop in glass of water before breakfast); protects intestines!

     

    Glutamine (one tsp in glass of water three times a day before meals).  start the day before chemo and continue first two days OF chemo; prevents neuropathy and joint pain as well as mouth sores.

     

    AHCC (a mushroom extract routinely prescribed for all chemo patients in Japan).  Take two three times a day between meals.  Can be expensive; Protocols for Life was the brand I was asked to get; there ARE cheaper versions, however.

     

    Melatonin (work gradually up to 20 mgs a night before bedtime), helps chemo to work better and abets sleep.

     

    Sylibien (one capsule a day with a meal), protects the liver.  Increase to two a day after chemo is finished and then restore antioxidants as well. 

     

    Best,

    Rosey

     

     

     

     

  • moonghostsnoop
    moonghostsnoop Member Posts: 2
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    carcinosarcoma

    2014-07-23 I am new. Did not see how to start a post?. I found in April of 2014 I had carcinosarcoma. I had the total abdominal hysterectomy. Was bleeding 6 weeks before surgery. Was told no nodes involved and invasion of myometrium of 0.1%. Told stage 1a. Told with 4 rounds of taxol and 4 isofosamide each round being 3 days in a row , one day taxol and isofosamide and the next 2just isofosamide and 4 - 15 minutes of vaginal brachytherapy I'd have an 80% survival. I got all the isofosamide and got through 2 rounds of taxol at a very high dose on both. The taxol caused an emergency for me but I did get 2 out of 4 in me and had to stop that one. I get the radiation in August. I am scared as I have stayed on the net to read through a lot of combined doctor studies. All keep saying even in stage 1 it is back in the lungs etc in 1or2 years. It has helped to see you people are alive last  that for me. I won't know what the last consult is rate will be told me after radiation so will be waiting to hear. The studies named off about every combined chemo and radiation still saying very poor and a lot dead? I did read in one of those isofosamide was considered best with a choice of two or three mixed in. Seems scary and scattered so I am glad to find this site. Please email me etc at atarten@hotmail.com. thanks.

  • aroelisland
    aroelisland Member Posts: 3
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    jazzy1 said:

    Great Information

    There's a lot of good topic threads on here from past years.  Suggest hitting the search button at the top and enter your topic of choice.  

     

    Points below I find of interest --Wink

     

      • Avoid sugar, especially fructose. All forms of sugar are detrimental to health in general and promote cancer. Fructose, however, is clearly one of the most harmful and should be avoided as much as possible.
      • Optimize your vitamin D. Vitamin D influences virtually every cell in your body and is one of nature's most potent cancer fighters. Vitamin D is actually able to enter cancer cells and trigger apoptosis (cell death). If you have cancer, your vitamin D level should be between 70 and 100 ng/ml. Vitamin D works synergistically with every cancer treatment I'm aware of, with no adverse effects. I suggest you try watching my one-hour free lecture on vitamin D to learn more.
      • Limit your protein. Newer research has emphasized the importance of the mTOR pathways. When these are active, cancer growth is accelerated. The best way to quiet this pathway is by limiting your protein to one gram of protein per kilogram of lean body weight, or roughly a bit less than half a gram of protein per every pound of lean body weight. For most people this ranges between 40 and 70 grams of protein a day, which is about 2/3 to half of what they are currently eating.
      • Avoid unfermented soy productsUnfermented soy is high in plant estrogens, or phytoestrogens, also known as isoflavones. In some studies, soy appears to work in concert with human estrogen to increase breast cell proliferation, which increases the chances for mutations and cancerous cells.
      • Improve your insulin and leptin receptor sensitivity. The best way to do this is by avoiding sugar and grains and restricting carbs to mostly fiber vegetables. Also making sure you are exercising, especially with Peak Fitness.
      • Maintain a healthy body weight. This will come naturally when you begin eating right for your nutritional type and exercising. It's important to lose excess body fat because fat produces estrogen.
      • Drink a pint to a quart of organic green vegetable juice daily. Please review my juicing instructions for more detailed information.
      • Get plenty of high quality animal-based omega-3 fats, such as krill oilOmega-3 deficiency is a common underlying factor for cancer.
      • Curcumin. This is the active ingredient in turmeric and in high concentrations can be very useful adjunct in the treatment of cancer. For example, it has demonstrated major therapeutic potential in preventing breast cancer metastasis.9 It's important to know that curcumin is generally not absorbed that well, so I've provided several absorption tips here.
      • Avoid drinking alcohol, or at least limit your alcoholic drinks to one per day.
      • Avoid electromagnetic fields as much as possible. Even electric blankets can increase your cancer risk.
      • Avoid synthetic hormone replacement therapy, especially if you have risk factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer is an estrogen-related cancer, and according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, breast cancer rates for women dropped in tandem with decreased use of hormone replacement therapy. (There are similar risks for younger women who use oral contraceptives. Birth control pills, which are also comprised of synthetic hormones, have been linked to cervical and breast cancers.)

    If you are experiencing excessive menopausal symptoms, you may want to consider bioidentical hormone replacement therapy instead, which uses hormones that are molecularly identical to the ones your body produces and do not wreak havoc on your system. This is a much safer alternative.

      • Avoid BPA, phthalates and other xenoestrogens. These are estrogen-like compounds that have been linked to increased breast cancer risk
      • Make sure you're not iodine deficient, as there's compelling evidence linking iodine deficiency with certain forms of cancer. Dr. David Brownstein10, author of the book Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can't Live Without It, is a proponent of iodine for breast cancer. It actually has potent anticancer properties and has been shown to cause cell death in breast and thyroid cancer cells.

    For more information, I recommend reading Dr. Brownstein's book. I have been researching iodine for some time ever since I interviewed Dr. Brownstein as I do believe that the bulk of what he states is spot on. However, I am not at all convinced that his dosage recommendations are correct. I believe they are too high.

    • Avoid charring your meats. Charcoal or flame broiled meat is linked with increased breast cancer risk. Acrylamide—a carcinogen created when starchy foods are baked, roasted or fried—has been found to increase cancer risk as well.
    Iodine Question

    Hi there, I hope you're doing and feeling well! I am wondering if you could tell me which supplements you take? My mom was just diagnosed with carcinosarcoma of the fallopian tube. I am also very interested in iodine (Lugol's formula), but want to know why you think Dr. Brownstein's suggestions are too high? Thank you in advance!

  • giggs100
    giggs100 Member Posts: 91 Member
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    carcinosarcoma

    2014-07-23 I am new. Did not see how to start a post?. I found in April of 2014 I had carcinosarcoma. I had the total abdominal hysterectomy. Was bleeding 6 weeks before surgery. Was told no nodes involved and invasion of myometrium of 0.1%. Told stage 1a. Told with 4 rounds of taxol and 4 isofosamide each round being 3 days in a row , one day taxol and isofosamide and the next 2just isofosamide and 4 - 15 minutes of vaginal brachytherapy I'd have an 80% survival. I got all the isofosamide and got through 2 rounds of taxol at a very high dose on both. The taxol caused an emergency for me but I did get 2 out of 4 in me and had to stop that one. I get the radiation in August. I am scared as I have stayed on the net to read through a lot of combined doctor studies. All keep saying even in stage 1 it is back in the lungs etc in 1or2 years. It has helped to see you people are alive last  that for me. I won't know what the last consult is rate will be told me after radiation so will be waiting to hear. The studies named off about every combined chemo and radiation still saying very poor and a lot dead? I did read in one of those isofosamide was considered best with a choice of two or three mixed in. Seems scary and scattered so I am glad to find this site. Please email me etc at atarten@hotmail.com. thanks.

    uterine carcinosarcoma

    10-9-15 I am also new.   I just want to thank each and everyone of you who have posted here.   I was just diagnosed with this as of last week Wednesday.   I am schudeled for my CT scan this coming Thursday to find out what stage I am in.  Plan 1 right now is my surgery at this time has been scheduled for Nov. 2nd for a complete hysterectomy (and depending what the CT scan shows possibly more).   I have been positive about the outcome but yet I am very frightened.  I just thank you all for your comments.  They have been very beneficial for me.

     

  • txtrisha55
    txtrisha55 Member Posts: 693 Member
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    giggs100 said:

    uterine carcinosarcoma

    10-9-15 I am also new.   I just want to thank each and everyone of you who have posted here.   I was just diagnosed with this as of last week Wednesday.   I am schudeled for my CT scan this coming Thursday to find out what stage I am in.  Plan 1 right now is my surgery at this time has been scheduled for Nov. 2nd for a complete hysterectomy (and depending what the CT scan shows possibly more).   I have been positive about the outcome but yet I am very frightened.  I just thank you all for your comments.  They have been very beneficial for me.

     

    For me, I was DX after a D&C

    For me, I was DX after a D&C for heavy bleeding after being post menapausal since I was 93-94. ( 36 at the time).  In 2011 I started having heavy bleeding and my gyn dr suggested a D&C.  After that I was called on the phone to be told that there were MMMT cells found in the pathology report.  She made the appoinment with the Gyn Onc. Dr here in Dallas at the UT SW Cancer Center and found me the best dr.  So had D&C March 25, April 1 called to tell me cancer.  Apr 4 first appointment with gyn onc dr and full abdominal surgery April 8.  Port (just one if you are having chemo, it will help save your veins) Chemo started May 8 for 6 treatments every 21 days of carbo taxol.  Last treatment Aug 22, 2011.  No radiation.  It has now been 4 years.  Number one thing for me was a postitive attitude.  If you have taxol you will lose your hair, it will grow back, I looked on it as a good thing and did not let it freak me out.  There are some ladies that it did bother and that is ok too, they get wigs, scarves, hats.  Me, I just learned how to shave my head bald and went on about my life.  I went to work bald, went shopping bald, went to plays and grandson's activities bald.  I had bad days and great days during chemo.  But life does get back to a new normal. You can change your whole way of life by reading the anti cancer books, changing your eating habits, start execising.  Lots of ladies have.  My attitude was OK I have cancer, lets deal with it. Get it out and then move to the next phase. Get through the chemo, whats next.  Living your life.  This is doable and you will find out how strong you are and you will get through this.  Surround yourself with those family and friends that will help make you stronger.  Have your pity party days but do not let yourself dweal in them, pull yourself back up.  Praying for all. trish