Kombucha Tea - Emily are you out there?

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NWGirl
NWGirl Member Posts: 122 Member
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
I was at a pickling class yesterday and the subject of Kombucha tea came up. I Googled it but the info was kind of generic. No real studies appear to have been done on it, though it seems to have been around for hundreds of years and used in numerous countries. Has anyone used this and had any personal experiences? Anyone ever ask their doctors if it's okay? My oncologist is very traditional - I know what he'd say w/o asking - "no scientific studies to prove it is safe or effective - avoid it".

I'm not disciplined enough to follow alternative treatment routines like Emily does (though I really admire what you have accomplished). My interest is it sounds like a fun science experiment in the kitchen and if it helps with my digestive issues that would be great. When I say "digestive issues", for me I'm referring to my life after my ileostomy take down surgery.

So I'm just curious what Emily's and any other members experiences have been. I would be brewing my own - not buying commercially.

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  • snommintj
    snommintj Member Posts: 601
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    It's great but maybe not for cancer
    I love the stuff and have been an advocate for years. I have given away hundreds, maybe even thousands of them. Virtually everyone that didn't kill it still uses it to this day. You can use different types of tea for different effects and flavors. I contribute my fertility to drinking it everyday for years. I had previously been told by doctors that I wouldn't be able to make babies. My business partner started drinking it about six months after I did. He was 38 and had grey hair and had lost some pep, he also had never made babies. Within three months of daily use, his hair began to turn more brown, he also slept less. After a year, you could barely see any grey at all. After about 18 months, his girlfriend of 11 years got pregnant, unplanned. He drinks several glasses a day, he looks five years younger than when he started drinking and has two kids and the energy to keep up with them.

    As far as drinking with cancer. I don't. Too much sugar. I have used the "mushroom" itself to treat severely dry skin. It's one of the most amazing things. Just put a piece on your skin for a few hours and it will feel like babies skin for days. I know some hippie girls that put the whole thing on their face and they look 18 all the time and their in their 30's.

    I would definitely recommend one for your family and limited doses for you
  • Sigma34
    Sigma34 Member Posts: 203
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    snommintj said:

    It's great but maybe not for cancer
    I love the stuff and have been an advocate for years. I have given away hundreds, maybe even thousands of them. Virtually everyone that didn't kill it still uses it to this day. You can use different types of tea for different effects and flavors. I contribute my fertility to drinking it everyday for years. I had previously been told by doctors that I wouldn't be able to make babies. My business partner started drinking it about six months after I did. He was 38 and had grey hair and had lost some pep, he also had never made babies. Within three months of daily use, his hair began to turn more brown, he also slept less. After a year, you could barely see any grey at all. After about 18 months, his girlfriend of 11 years got pregnant, unplanned. He drinks several glasses a day, he looks five years younger than when he started drinking and has two kids and the energy to keep up with them.

    As far as drinking with cancer. I don't. Too much sugar. I have used the "mushroom" itself to treat severely dry skin. It's one of the most amazing things. Just put a piece on your skin for a few hours and it will feel like babies skin for days. I know some hippie girls that put the whole thing on their face and they look 18 all the time and their in their 30's.

    I would definitely recommend one for your family and limited doses for you

    I'd love to know where to
    I'd love to know where to get some mushroom to put on my face! :). Help me out.
  • elizabethgd
    elizabethgd Member Posts: 145
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    Sigma34 said:

    I'd love to know where to
    I'd love to know where to get some mushroom to put on my face! :). Help me out.

    Kombucha
    Where do you get kombucha? My skin is very dry since radiation and chemo...of course I am almost 60 . But would like to try it topically
  • Fight for my love
    Fight for my love Member Posts: 1,522 Member
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    Sigma34 said:

    I'd love to know where to
    I'd love to know where to get some mushroom to put on my face! :). Help me out.

    Me too,I would like to know
    Me too,I would like to know what kind of mushroom will work for skin,I am in my 30's,I want to look like 18.:)
  • snommintj
    snommintj Member Posts: 601
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    Me too,I would like to know
    Me too,I would like to know what kind of mushroom will work for skin,I am in my 30's,I want to look like 18.:)

    "mushroom"
    Technically it's not a mushroom, although it does resemble one. You probably shouldn't eat it, I don't know anyone who has. I do have a friend that dried his out and smoked it. He said it didn't do anything.

    It's actually a bacterial lichen matrix, it grows on top of tea that you have previously brewed. It grows to the size of your container and replicates about once a week. To use on your skin, you simply remove it from the tea and place it on your skin. Leave there as long as you like. You can use it every day. If you're placing the whole mushroom on your face or skin I would suggest growing it separately from the one you drink from. I don't currently have one. You can buy one over the internet for just a few dollars, they usually send instructions with it. They are very simple to grow and require very little maintenance. I say find one on the internet and give it a try.
  • Nana b
    Nana b Member Posts: 3,030 Member
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    kombucha-tea
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/kombucha-tea/AN01658

    What is Kombucha tea? What are the health benefits of Kombucha tea?
    Answer
    from Brent A. Bauer, M.D.
    Long popular in other countries, Kombucha tea is gaining popularity in the United States. Although frequently referred to as a mushroom, which it resembles, Kombucha is not a mushroom — it's a colony of bacteria and yeast. Kombucha tea is made by adding the colony to sugar and black or green tea and allowing the mix to ferment. The resulting liquid contains vinegar, B vitamins and a number of other chemical compounds. Kombucha tea is commonly prepared by taking a starter sample from an existing culture and growing a new colony in a fresh jar. Health benefits attributed to Kombucha tea include stimulating the immune system, preventing cancer, and improving digestion and liver function.

    As with any dietary supplement, it's critical to do your homework before considering using Kombucha tea. First, determine the level of evidence supporting the health claims. In this case, Kombucha tea's benefits are based on personal reports, and lab and animal studies. To date, there hasn't been a single human trial reported in a major medical journal. This doesn't mean that Kombucha tea can't possibly have health benefits; it just means that at this time there's no direct evidence that it provides the benefits it's reported to have.

    The next question is whether there have been any reports of harm or illness caused by the product. In the case of Kombucha tea, there are reports of adverse effects such as stomach upset and allergic reactions. More worrying are the reports of toxic reactions and metabolic acidosis. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration cautions that the risk of contamination is high because Kombucha tea is often brewed in homes under nonsterile conditions. Lead poisoning also may be a risk if ceramic pots are used for brewing — the acids in the tea may leach lead from the ceramic glaze.

    In short, there's not good evidence that Kombucha tea delivers on its health claims. At the same time, several cases of harm have been reported. Therefore, until definitive studies quantify the risks and benefits of Kombucha tea, it's prudent to avoid it.
  • NWGirl
    NWGirl Member Posts: 122 Member
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    Thanks for your input
    Thanks for the input. The girl I bought my "mushroom" from said she got hers from "an old hippie" about 10 years ago. She said she sees them listed on Craigslist from time to time as well.

    I saw the Mayo Clinic article when I Googled it as well as others that pretty much said the same thing. It's so frustrating that so many of these alternative treatments probably do provide some health benefits - but they just haven't been studied.

    The tea does seem to have quite a following though - anyone who I've talked to who drinks it just loves it and seems to think it makes them feel better.
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