Recovering from radical nephrectomy

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Comments

  • suzika
    suzika Member Posts: 12
    Yikes123 said:

    Kidney removal recovery
    My husband had an 11 cm mass removed along with kidney 3 weeks ago, recovery is slow as to be expected, but we never expected he would lose 30 pounds since surgery. Is this typical? Doctor called reported that there was no indication at all it has spread and he needs no further treatment. Any insights would be appreciated!

    It is very likely that he
    It is very likely that he just isn't eating enough as you don't feel like eating when you hurt. Or at least I don't. I lost weight following my nephrectomy as I just didn't eat much.

    You could try and get him to drink smoothies if he doesn't feel like eating. Can he afford to lose the weight?
  • nudger2802
    nudger2802 Member Posts: 1
    suzika said:

    It is very likely that he
    It is very likely that he just isn't eating enough as you don't feel like eating when you hurt. Or at least I don't. I lost weight following my nephrectomy as I just didn't eat much.

    You could try and get him to drink smoothies if he doesn't feel like eating. Can he afford to lose the weight?

    10 Days post op
    Hi all, glad to hear you guys are all so positive. I was diagnosed in April by a student doctor after being told by my G.P. that I just had trapped wind. After a C.T. scan I was told I had a 7cm tumor on my right kidney. Had a radical laprascopic nephrectomy on 25th June and came home 27th June. Only prob I had whilst in hospital was a slight chest infection but thats clearing up well now.

    Just want to know if its normal to have muscle cramps around the surgery site if I walk round for more than a few minutes and to not be able to lie down flat or on soft surfaces without severe discomfort and pulling sensation around the surgery site.

    Also my stiches are starting to itch and I am trying really hard not to scratch them, has anyone got any good ideas on how to releive this. It is worst when I have just come out of the shower. How soon will it be before I can soak in the tub without fear of causing problems to the wounds?

    Nige
  • icemantoo
    icemantoo Member Posts: 3,359 Member

    10 Days post op
    Hi all, glad to hear you guys are all so positive. I was diagnosed in April by a student doctor after being told by my G.P. that I just had trapped wind. After a C.T. scan I was told I had a 7cm tumor on my right kidney. Had a radical laprascopic nephrectomy on 25th June and came home 27th June. Only prob I had whilst in hospital was a slight chest infection but thats clearing up well now.

    Just want to know if its normal to have muscle cramps around the surgery site if I walk round for more than a few minutes and to not be able to lie down flat or on soft surfaces without severe discomfort and pulling sensation around the surgery site.

    Also my stiches are starting to itch and I am trying really hard not to scratch them, has anyone got any good ideas on how to releive this. It is worst when I have just come out of the shower. How soon will it be before I can soak in the tub without fear of causing problems to the wounds?

    Nige

    Seems like old times
    Nige,

    Your aches and pains sound normal. Just part of your initiation to our little club. As for specific questions ask your doctor. Things do get better,. Day by day.

    Best wishes,

    Icemantoo
  • Johnnyb
    Johnnyb Member Posts: 17
    1 Year after Surgery
    Hello all,

    Well August 30th will be my 1 year mark after having my right kidney removed. I am back to normal, working doing everything I did before. My Doctor order a Chest X-ray and blood work and set my appointment for Sept. 1st for my 1 year check up. Why a chest X-ray? I though they would do a CT Scan to make sure there wasn't any cnacer retirning. Well, I am sure that everyrhing is OK.
  • Johnnyb
    Johnnyb Member Posts: 17
    1 Year after Surgery
    Sorry this keeps posting twice
  • icemantoo
    icemantoo Member Posts: 3,359 Member
    Johnnyb said:

    1 Year after Surgery
    Hello all,

    Well August 30th will be my 1 year mark after having my right kidney removed. I am back to normal, working doing everything I did before. My Doctor order a Chest X-ray and blood work and set my appointment for Sept. 1st for my 1 year check up. Why a chest X-ray? I though they would do a CT Scan to make sure there wasn't any cnacer retirning. Well, I am sure that everyrhing is OK.

    Chest xray
    Johnnyb,

    The chest xray is a routine test given before and after RCC surgery to rule out metastisis of the RCC which first shows up in the lungs. Do not worry about it.

    Best wishes,

    Icemantoo
  • Johnnyb
    Johnnyb Member Posts: 17
    icemantoo said:

    Chest xray
    Johnnyb,

    The chest xray is a routine test given before and after RCC surgery to rule out metastisis of the RCC which first shows up in the lungs. Do not worry about it.

    Best wishes,

    Icemantoo

    Chest X-ray
    Thanks Icemantoo, I am sure everything is going to be fine. Glad your still doing great after all these years.
  • pianowski
    pianowski Member Posts: 1

    10 Days post op
    Hi all, glad to hear you guys are all so positive. I was diagnosed in April by a student doctor after being told by my G.P. that I just had trapped wind. After a C.T. scan I was told I had a 7cm tumor on my right kidney. Had a radical laprascopic nephrectomy on 25th June and came home 27th June. Only prob I had whilst in hospital was a slight chest infection but thats clearing up well now.

    Just want to know if its normal to have muscle cramps around the surgery site if I walk round for more than a few minutes and to not be able to lie down flat or on soft surfaces without severe discomfort and pulling sensation around the surgery site.

    Also my stiches are starting to itch and I am trying really hard not to scratch them, has anyone got any good ideas on how to releive this. It is worst when I have just come out of the shower. How soon will it be before I can soak in the tub without fear of causing problems to the wounds?

    Nige

    three weeks post op
    Hello Nige,yes I can appreciate how you feel,I had the last of the staples taken out four days ago,I changed my own dressings every two days and I found patting with betadine lotion took the itch away.I still get discomfort and have to change positions but things are getting easier.I am three weeks post-op radical nephrectomy left kidney for large encapsulated cancer tumor
    My problem is my stomach is very sensitive to certain foods and I still get pains before opening bowels and sometimes before urination,also have an inguinal hernia which doesnt help
    Is this all just a settling down process post surgery?Any advice would be gratefully accepted.My body feels totally out of sync.
    George
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    Greetings from across The Pond
    I hope this superb thread stays active since it's obviously done a lot for many people.

    A pretty typical case, I'm male and 69 and enjoyed lifelong perfect health so far as anyone knew. However, earlier this year I'd remarked to my Wife "I seem to run a chronic low-grade fever these days" but we didn't pursue the remark. I'd also been complaining of backache for a year or two but put this down to sitting at a computer all day long plus too much golf (coupled with not enough rowing and weight-lifting, two other favourite activities which have helped to keep my back in good shape).

    Detection would doubtless have come too late for me but for the 'lucky accident' that many of us have experienced. In my case it was a wild two hour journey being tossed around in the back of a coach over winding, hilly, minor country roads with frequent small hump-backed bridges, for a golf match in the Scottish Highlands, followed by a four and a half hour round on a warm sunny day (despite our being some way further north than Moscow!). Being a redhead (not very apparent now, alas) I don't take the heat well and had got dehydrated so I was not surprised by macrohaematuria when I got back in the clubhouse but my urine continued to be bloody that night so I saw my Doc. (also a golfing pal) the next day. This led to a physical check and cytology followed by cystoscopy and later a CT scan which revealed an 8cm. mass on my right kidney. I'm scheduled to have tumour and kidney removed (but not adrenal gland or any lymph nodes - the cyst, which appears well-contained is at the bottom end) on Monday (5th Dec.).

    It's already been a most interesting experience and I haven't even got to the fun part yet! My Doc. is excellent and the Consultant Urologist who is due to operate (laproscopic if all goes to plan) is an ace so I've had perfect answers to my many questions but I've got a few more that I'm hoping some of you guys might be able to help me with. Tim Berners-Lee changed the world so much - I Googled "recuperation from radical nephrectomy" and discovered this forum which I've found fascinating. The fund of goodwill here and on the other big thread "Waiting for surgery" is great. There are also useful insights by the likes of Jamie1.3cm. and garym, to name but two, and the ever-present young iceman, who's a sort of patron-saint of the survivor community, is an icon, not just for his wise words but for continuing to hang out here as a living proof that the end is probably not nigh.

    I notice that "recurrence" is a source of worry for many of us. Perhaps it doesn't need to be. RCC is a "sneaky" cancer - usually asymptomatic so it quietly develops for many years before being unmasked. However, post-op. surveillance is routine and so if there is a return visit by something unwelcome it will be spotted very much earlier and a counter-attack can be launched at once. So, the recurrence can be headed off, unlike the original bolt from the blue.

    Can someone please help with any of the following questions?

    1. Is the incidence of renal cysts and/or RCC the same for left and right kidneys? If not, is there any clinical significance in the difference and does this impact the prognosis?

    2. Since the body is asymmetric, what are the major differences in nature and ease of intervention between left and right kidney?

    3. Most RCC patients are over 60 and more than half are male. Does this simply reflect the fact that renal cysts develop over many years and so are most often discovered later in life and the fact that some risk factors (notably smoking, obesity and high blood pressure) possibly have a greater prevalence in men than women?

    [Reading this thread it looked to me that there is a statistical over-representation of ladies, younger patients and right kidney cysts but that's probably rubbish - the fair sex and younger people are possibly more communicative and a proper check might show I've imagined more right than left kidney problems.]

    4. Has anyone been warned of "The Grapefruit Effect" (that is the dramatic potentiation of some medicines and the attenuation of others by grapefruit juice - so that the effective dosage of your meds. gets screwed up)?

    5. Has anyone been cautioned against using St. John's Wort remedies before surgery (because of blood-thinning or other effects)?

    6. Should alcohol consumption be kept to a modest level before surgery and if so how modest?!

    7. I'm keen to get back to golf, rowing, pumping iron and distance running as soon as possible. Can any golf freaks or gym rats clue me up on how soon I could sensibly do so - without setting back my recovery?

    I've been a bit used to turning up after the party's over so I'm hoping this message isn't the last one ever to appear on this thread! Anyway, I wish all the very best to the contributors to these forums and to this community generally.

    T.
  • icemantoo
    icemantoo Member Posts: 3,359 Member

    Greetings from across The Pond
    I hope this superb thread stays active since it's obviously done a lot for many people.

    A pretty typical case, I'm male and 69 and enjoyed lifelong perfect health so far as anyone knew. However, earlier this year I'd remarked to my Wife "I seem to run a chronic low-grade fever these days" but we didn't pursue the remark. I'd also been complaining of backache for a year or two but put this down to sitting at a computer all day long plus too much golf (coupled with not enough rowing and weight-lifting, two other favourite activities which have helped to keep my back in good shape).

    Detection would doubtless have come too late for me but for the 'lucky accident' that many of us have experienced. In my case it was a wild two hour journey being tossed around in the back of a coach over winding, hilly, minor country roads with frequent small hump-backed bridges, for a golf match in the Scottish Highlands, followed by a four and a half hour round on a warm sunny day (despite our being some way further north than Moscow!). Being a redhead (not very apparent now, alas) I don't take the heat well and had got dehydrated so I was not surprised by macrohaematuria when I got back in the clubhouse but my urine continued to be bloody that night so I saw my Doc. (also a golfing pal) the next day. This led to a physical check and cytology followed by cystoscopy and later a CT scan which revealed an 8cm. mass on my right kidney. I'm scheduled to have tumour and kidney removed (but not adrenal gland or any lymph nodes - the cyst, which appears well-contained is at the bottom end) on Monday (5th Dec.).

    It's already been a most interesting experience and I haven't even got to the fun part yet! My Doc. is excellent and the Consultant Urologist who is due to operate (laproscopic if all goes to plan) is an ace so I've had perfect answers to my many questions but I've got a few more that I'm hoping some of you guys might be able to help me with. Tim Berners-Lee changed the world so much - I Googled "recuperation from radical nephrectomy" and discovered this forum which I've found fascinating. The fund of goodwill here and on the other big thread "Waiting for surgery" is great. There are also useful insights by the likes of Jamie1.3cm. and garym, to name but two, and the ever-present young iceman, who's a sort of patron-saint of the survivor community, is an icon, not just for his wise words but for continuing to hang out here as a living proof that the end is probably not nigh.

    I notice that "recurrence" is a source of worry for many of us. Perhaps it doesn't need to be. RCC is a "sneaky" cancer - usually asymptomatic so it quietly develops for many years before being unmasked. However, post-op. surveillance is routine and so if there is a return visit by something unwelcome it will be spotted very much earlier and a counter-attack can be launched at once. So, the recurrence can be headed off, unlike the original bolt from the blue.

    Can someone please help with any of the following questions?

    1. Is the incidence of renal cysts and/or RCC the same for left and right kidneys? If not, is there any clinical significance in the difference and does this impact the prognosis?

    2. Since the body is asymmetric, what are the major differences in nature and ease of intervention between left and right kidney?

    3. Most RCC patients are over 60 and more than half are male. Does this simply reflect the fact that renal cysts develop over many years and so are most often discovered later in life and the fact that some risk factors (notably smoking, obesity and high blood pressure) possibly have a greater prevalence in men than women?

    [Reading this thread it looked to me that there is a statistical over-representation of ladies, younger patients and right kidney cysts but that's probably rubbish - the fair sex and younger people are possibly more communicative and a proper check might show I've imagined more right than left kidney problems.]

    4. Has anyone been warned of "The Grapefruit Effect" (that is the dramatic potentiation of some medicines and the attenuation of others by grapefruit juice - so that the effective dosage of your meds. gets screwed up)?

    5. Has anyone been cautioned against using St. John's Wort remedies before surgery (because of blood-thinning or other effects)?

    6. Should alcohol consumption be kept to a modest level before surgery and if so how modest?!

    7. I'm keen to get back to golf, rowing, pumping iron and distance running as soon as possible. Can any golf freaks or gym rats clue me up on how soon I could sensibly do so - without setting back my recovery?

    I've been a bit used to turning up after the party's over so I'm hoping this message isn't the last one ever to appear on this thread! Anyway, I wish all the very best to the contributors to these forums and to this community generally.

    T.

    Greetimgs Back
    T.

    I see you have done your homework and read some of my postings. I am not sure I can help with most of your questions. As to 1 and 2 I have never been aware of difference in RCC between the 2 kidneys. As for 3 my understanding is that the primary group is males between 50 and 70, but that the females are only slightly behind us ( I think they want to be behind us in this). I have no idea as to 4 and 5. As to 6 alcohol other than moderate use causes its own problems. In answering number 7 I reflect on a young mother in our group who went on a roller coaster 3 months after the surgery. That is fine, except wait a year for that. You are going to be able to get back to normal activities in 6 weeks or so, but do not push the extreme stuff for a year and until your body tells you it is ready.

    Additionally you and I are no spring chickens at 69 and 68 years old. Your surgery at 69 is going to be tougher than mine when I was a youthful 59. Take that in consideration .

    Best wishes,

    Icemantoo
  • garym
    garym Member Posts: 1,647

    Greetings from across The Pond
    I hope this superb thread stays active since it's obviously done a lot for many people.

    A pretty typical case, I'm male and 69 and enjoyed lifelong perfect health so far as anyone knew. However, earlier this year I'd remarked to my Wife "I seem to run a chronic low-grade fever these days" but we didn't pursue the remark. I'd also been complaining of backache for a year or two but put this down to sitting at a computer all day long plus too much golf (coupled with not enough rowing and weight-lifting, two other favourite activities which have helped to keep my back in good shape).

    Detection would doubtless have come too late for me but for the 'lucky accident' that many of us have experienced. In my case it was a wild two hour journey being tossed around in the back of a coach over winding, hilly, minor country roads with frequent small hump-backed bridges, for a golf match in the Scottish Highlands, followed by a four and a half hour round on a warm sunny day (despite our being some way further north than Moscow!). Being a redhead (not very apparent now, alas) I don't take the heat well and had got dehydrated so I was not surprised by macrohaematuria when I got back in the clubhouse but my urine continued to be bloody that night so I saw my Doc. (also a golfing pal) the next day. This led to a physical check and cytology followed by cystoscopy and later a CT scan which revealed an 8cm. mass on my right kidney. I'm scheduled to have tumour and kidney removed (but not adrenal gland or any lymph nodes - the cyst, which appears well-contained is at the bottom end) on Monday (5th Dec.).

    It's already been a most interesting experience and I haven't even got to the fun part yet! My Doc. is excellent and the Consultant Urologist who is due to operate (laproscopic if all goes to plan) is an ace so I've had perfect answers to my many questions but I've got a few more that I'm hoping some of you guys might be able to help me with. Tim Berners-Lee changed the world so much - I Googled "recuperation from radical nephrectomy" and discovered this forum which I've found fascinating. The fund of goodwill here and on the other big thread "Waiting for surgery" is great. There are also useful insights by the likes of Jamie1.3cm. and garym, to name but two, and the ever-present young iceman, who's a sort of patron-saint of the survivor community, is an icon, not just for his wise words but for continuing to hang out here as a living proof that the end is probably not nigh.

    I notice that "recurrence" is a source of worry for many of us. Perhaps it doesn't need to be. RCC is a "sneaky" cancer - usually asymptomatic so it quietly develops for many years before being unmasked. However, post-op. surveillance is routine and so if there is a return visit by something unwelcome it will be spotted very much earlier and a counter-attack can be launched at once. So, the recurrence can be headed off, unlike the original bolt from the blue.

    Can someone please help with any of the following questions?

    1. Is the incidence of renal cysts and/or RCC the same for left and right kidneys? If not, is there any clinical significance in the difference and does this impact the prognosis?

    2. Since the body is asymmetric, what are the major differences in nature and ease of intervention between left and right kidney?

    3. Most RCC patients are over 60 and more than half are male. Does this simply reflect the fact that renal cysts develop over many years and so are most often discovered later in life and the fact that some risk factors (notably smoking, obesity and high blood pressure) possibly have a greater prevalence in men than women?

    [Reading this thread it looked to me that there is a statistical over-representation of ladies, younger patients and right kidney cysts but that's probably rubbish - the fair sex and younger people are possibly more communicative and a proper check might show I've imagined more right than left kidney problems.]

    4. Has anyone been warned of "The Grapefruit Effect" (that is the dramatic potentiation of some medicines and the attenuation of others by grapefruit juice - so that the effective dosage of your meds. gets screwed up)?

    5. Has anyone been cautioned against using St. John's Wort remedies before surgery (because of blood-thinning or other effects)?

    6. Should alcohol consumption be kept to a modest level before surgery and if so how modest?!

    7. I'm keen to get back to golf, rowing, pumping iron and distance running as soon as possible. Can any golf freaks or gym rats clue me up on how soon I could sensibly do so - without setting back my recovery?

    I've been a bit used to turning up after the party's over so I'm hoping this message isn't the last one ever to appear on this thread! Anyway, I wish all the very best to the contributors to these forums and to this community generally.

    T.

    Welcome to the club...
    Hi T,

    We are alike in many ways. I'm a bit younger at 60, 2 years post op left side, I share your passion for golf and weight lifting, but I walk instead of run as it is easier on the knees. I also share your views on recurrence, refusing to worry about that which I cannot control and believing that surveillance will provide early enough detection to go back on the attack. Because I have only one kidney I watch my protein and sodium intake and monitor by blood pressure, but life is pretty "normal ' other than that.

    I have no insight or information on no. 1, but I'm sure that if there were anything significant someone would have studied it. As for no. 2, the surgery on the right is a bit more difficult than the left, mainly because of the proximity of the liver and the shortness of the renal artery. I think no. 3 is spot on and as for the over-representation of ladies here, I think women in general are more comfortable sharing than us guys. Never heard of the grapefruit effect or problems with St, John's Wort. I've been told by both of my docs that alcohol is fine in moderation which they described as 2 drinks per day max., I didn't drink before surgery as I was recovering from injuries due to a motorcycle accident that led to the discovery of my rcc. No. 7, all I can say is listen to your body and recognize your need for R&R, I started walking the day after surgery, but to my standards not theirs. Their idea of a "walk" was a short distance down the hall and back, I did 4 laps (about 1/2 mile), surrounded by nurses sure I would collapse, without a problem and the day before I went home I walked the halls for 4 miles pushing my I.V. cart all the way, but I regularly walk in excess of 100 miles per month so I was in tune with my limitations. I started lifting weights (lightly) 2 weeks after I got home and could have played golf at about 4 to 6 weeks except it was the dead of winter here so I had to wait for spring. Your age will play a part, but it sounds like you take pretty good care of yourself and I think because of that your recovery will be shorter than average.

    It won't be long before this is all behind you and things will get back to "normal", good luck and God speed.

    Keep us posted,

    Gary
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    icemantoo said:

    Greetimgs Back
    T.

    I see you have done your homework and read some of my postings. I am not sure I can help with most of your questions. As to 1 and 2 I have never been aware of difference in RCC between the 2 kidneys. As for 3 my understanding is that the primary group is males between 50 and 70, but that the females are only slightly behind us ( I think they want to be behind us in this). I have no idea as to 4 and 5. As to 6 alcohol other than moderate use causes its own problems. In answering number 7 I reflect on a young mother in our group who went on a roller coaster 3 months after the surgery. That is fine, except wait a year for that. You are going to be able to get back to normal activities in 6 weeks or so, but do not push the extreme stuff for a year and until your body tells you it is ready.

    Additionally you and I are no spring chickens at 69 and 68 years old. Your surgery at 69 is going to be tougher than mine when I was a youthful 59. Take that in consideration .

    Best wishes,

    Icemantoo

    The Grapefruit effect
    Thanks for the swift response iceman. I'm not a heavy drinker but am easing back on my daily consumption - from two glasses of wine to one with my evening meal. Thanks also for the guidance on recovery time. No risk of my ever going anywhere near a roller coaster!! As you say, you and I aren't spring chickens but I'm in very good health - obvious excepted - and have a BMI of 23.1 which should help, though I'm a bit concerned at the amount of weight some people lose since I couldn't afford to shed twenty pounds. Is weight loss likely to be significant? I never feel the cold normally but might that change? I have been sneezing a lot in the last year or two and am a bit concerned that this (and coughing) could be a problem in early phase recovery - is this daft?

    The Grapefruit Effect is real and was discovered by chance (in the US) some 20 years ago. This short item gives an excellent sketch:

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-08/acs-nrt072308.php

    I don't want to start a hare (or a scare) but it's a fact that may be of interest to some patients.
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    garym said:

    Welcome to the club...
    Hi T,

    We are alike in many ways. I'm a bit younger at 60, 2 years post op left side, I share your passion for golf and weight lifting, but I walk instead of run as it is easier on the knees. I also share your views on recurrence, refusing to worry about that which I cannot control and believing that surveillance will provide early enough detection to go back on the attack. Because I have only one kidney I watch my protein and sodium intake and monitor by blood pressure, but life is pretty "normal ' other than that.

    I have no insight or information on no. 1, but I'm sure that if there were anything significant someone would have studied it. As for no. 2, the surgery on the right is a bit more difficult than the left, mainly because of the proximity of the liver and the shortness of the renal artery. I think no. 3 is spot on and as for the over-representation of ladies here, I think women in general are more comfortable sharing than us guys. Never heard of the grapefruit effect or problems with St, John's Wort. I've been told by both of my docs that alcohol is fine in moderation which they described as 2 drinks per day max., I didn't drink before surgery as I was recovering from injuries due to a motorcycle accident that led to the discovery of my rcc. No. 7, all I can say is listen to your body and recognize your need for R&R, I started walking the day after surgery, but to my standards not theirs. Their idea of a "walk" was a short distance down the hall and back, I did 4 laps (about 1/2 mile), surrounded by nurses sure I would collapse, without a problem and the day before I went home I walked the halls for 4 miles pushing my I.V. cart all the way, but I regularly walk in excess of 100 miles per month so I was in tune with my limitations. I started lifting weights (lightly) 2 weeks after I got home and could have played golf at about 4 to 6 weeks except it was the dead of winter here so I had to wait for spring. Your age will play a part, but it sounds like you take pretty good care of yourself and I think because of that your recovery will be shorter than average.

    It won't be long before this is all behind you and things will get back to "normal", good luck and God speed.

    Keep us posted,

    Gary

    Attitude
    Gary,

    Hi. Thanks for the good advice. I've admired the philosophic approach you've advocated on this and other threads lately - look for the positive in any situation. (An ante-natal advisor encouraged her class:- keep walking while pregnant and best on soft ground, e.g. grass and suggested that the husbands present should join their wives. A thoughtful husband asked if it would be ok for his wife to carry a golf bag while they walked.)

    I've started monitoring my blood pressure which has been rather high recently. The relationship between kidney disease and BP seems to be very complex so I'll study my patterns as best I can. What have you found out about your own? You're plainly a thinker so you might find the link I sent (above) to iceman on the Grapefruit Effect interesting.

    I'm greatly cheered by your info. on your recovery. I've got an ergometer, an elliptical trainer, a Concept2 D rowing machine, a Nautilus Smith machine and free weights at home, though I've not used them much lately. I'll try to remember that I'm rather older than you are but, that said, I'm encouraged by your experience of exercise in your recovery. Mustn't be too cavalier though and will heed the advice to listen to what my body tells me.

    I've just got home after finishing with a tap-in 4 on the 18th at Carnoustie. I had planned on another couple of rounds pre-op but it was bitter on the links today and snow is not far away so I might just quit while I'm ahead (need to finish gutter repairs and dismantle a scaffold tower after painting our exterior woodwork anyway - both things that, like bringing in logs, I soon won't be able to do for a while!). So I guess I'll have to pull out of our Winter League for the next couple of months :-(

    Thanks again to you and to iceman and I'll keep you posted - this forum is one of the very best resources I've discovered.

    T.
  • garym
    garym Member Posts: 1,647

    Attitude
    Gary,

    Hi. Thanks for the good advice. I've admired the philosophic approach you've advocated on this and other threads lately - look for the positive in any situation. (An ante-natal advisor encouraged her class:- keep walking while pregnant and best on soft ground, e.g. grass and suggested that the husbands present should join their wives. A thoughtful husband asked if it would be ok for his wife to carry a golf bag while they walked.)

    I've started monitoring my blood pressure which has been rather high recently. The relationship between kidney disease and BP seems to be very complex so I'll study my patterns as best I can. What have you found out about your own? You're plainly a thinker so you might find the link I sent (above) to iceman on the Grapefruit Effect interesting.

    I'm greatly cheered by your info. on your recovery. I've got an ergometer, an elliptical trainer, a Concept2 D rowing machine, a Nautilus Smith machine and free weights at home, though I've not used them much lately. I'll try to remember that I'm rather older than you are but, that said, I'm encouraged by your experience of exercise in your recovery. Mustn't be too cavalier though and will heed the advice to listen to what my body tells me.

    I've just got home after finishing with a tap-in 4 on the 18th at Carnoustie. I had planned on another couple of rounds pre-op but it was bitter on the links today and snow is not far away so I might just quit while I'm ahead (need to finish gutter repairs and dismantle a scaffold tower after painting our exterior woodwork anyway - both things that, like bringing in logs, I soon won't be able to do for a while!). So I guess I'll have to pull out of our Winter League for the next couple of months :-(

    Thanks again to you and to iceman and I'll keep you posted - this forum is one of the very best resources I've discovered.

    T.

    BP, etc...
    T,

    What would Jean VandeVelde have given for your score in 99??? You have many great and historic courses to choose from and I envy you. Here in Michigan there are many fine courses as well, but they lack the history which is such a big part of the game to me. I did get to play a few courses in Ireland several years ago and it was a trip I will never forget.

    I'm not much of a grapefruit lover, at least not without a little vodka, but I'll check out the link.

    I have family history of high blood pressure, heart disease, and diabetes. I was overweight and taking low dose medications for both BP and cholesterol when I finally made up my mind to do something about it. I started eating right and walking, I dropped 50 pounds and no longer needed either med. Prior to my nephrectomy my BP was averaging a healthy 118/76, since surgery it has been around 130/80 which my doc says is as expected for a person with only one kidney and not to worry, I monitor it weekly anyway.

    I believe those of us that are accustomed to regular regular exercise have an easier time with recovery because we have a better feel for needing rest vs. when it is okay to push it a bit, I think you will find this to be true. You are wise to spend your pre-op time finishing up the things you will not feel like doing post-op, if you don't you'll wind up paying a price for trying to do them later. You have great spirit and attitude on your side, that is half the battle.

    Best wishes,

    Gary
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    garym said:

    BP, etc...
    T,

    What would Jean VandeVelde have given for your score in 99??? You have many great and historic courses to choose from and I envy you. Here in Michigan there are many fine courses as well, but they lack the history which is such a big part of the game to me. I did get to play a few courses in Ireland several years ago and it was a trip I will never forget.

    I'm not much of a grapefruit lover, at least not without a little vodka, but I'll check out the link.

    I have family history of high blood pressure, heart disease, and diabetes. I was overweight and taking low dose medications for both BP and cholesterol when I finally made up my mind to do something about it. I started eating right and walking, I dropped 50 pounds and no longer needed either med. Prior to my nephrectomy my BP was averaging a healthy 118/76, since surgery it has been around 130/80 which my doc says is as expected for a person with only one kidney and not to worry, I monitor it weekly anyway.

    I believe those of us that are accustomed to regular regular exercise have an easier time with recovery because we have a better feel for needing rest vs. when it is okay to push it a bit, I think you will find this to be true. You are wise to spend your pre-op time finishing up the things you will not feel like doing post-op, if you don't you'll wind up paying a price for trying to do them later. You have great spirit and attitude on your side, that is half the battle.

    Best wishes,

    Gary

    BP etc
    Thanks Gary. Have just received admission details for Monday.

    Well done for having taken control of your life-style and maintained it so well. The changes you made sure paid off and the results are an object lesson for others. I'm a little concerned about my own BP and will monitor it frequently for a while to try to get a dependable overall picture. I've maintained the same bodyweight, within a few pounds, for the past 50+ years and I'm a non-smoker. I shall, however, trim back my modest alcohol intake a little and reduce my excessive consumption of espresso. The latter change may well make quite a difference to my BP and I'll talk to my Doc. about it also.

    I'm not golfing again for now. Your comments are on the money. A course I play a bit is Montrose links which is the 5th oldest course in the world. I hope all goes on well for our golfing friend foxhd - another of the great people one comes across on these inspiring forums.
    I have no doubt that the outlook for contributors to these threads is a lot better than it would have been if they hadn't discovered this invaluable resource.

    Kind regards,

    T.
  • garym
    garym Member Posts: 1,647

    BP etc
    Thanks Gary. Have just received admission details for Monday.

    Well done for having taken control of your life-style and maintained it so well. The changes you made sure paid off and the results are an object lesson for others. I'm a little concerned about my own BP and will monitor it frequently for a while to try to get a dependable overall picture. I've maintained the same bodyweight, within a few pounds, for the past 50+ years and I'm a non-smoker. I shall, however, trim back my modest alcohol intake a little and reduce my excessive consumption of espresso. The latter change may well make quite a difference to my BP and I'll talk to my Doc. about it also.

    I'm not golfing again for now. Your comments are on the money. A course I play a bit is Montrose links which is the 5th oldest course in the world. I hope all goes on well for our golfing friend foxhd - another of the great people one comes across on these inspiring forums.
    I have no doubt that the outlook for contributors to these threads is a lot better than it would have been if they hadn't discovered this invaluable resource.

    Kind regards,

    T.

    Monday...
    T,

    I'll be away from my computer for the weekend but I wanted to wish you well for Monday. You sound to be in great shape both mentally and physically so I expect to hear that you have played holes that were tougher than this when you return. When the weather allows and you get back on the links this this experience should be good for a couple extra strokes from your mates, but don't expect their generosity to last very long.

    Aces to you,

    Gary
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    garym said:

    Monday...
    T,

    I'll be away from my computer for the weekend but I wanted to wish you well for Monday. You sound to be in great shape both mentally and physically so I expect to hear that you have played holes that were tougher than this when you return. When the weather allows and you get back on the links this this experience should be good for a couple extra strokes from your mates, but don't expect their generosity to last very long.

    Aces to you,

    Gary

    Handicap and op.
    Thanks for the good wishes Gary. It's reassuring to know Statesside golfers are like UK golfers - I give it about three rounds before someone says 'My sprained wrist trumps the fact that you used to have cancer'.

    I hope to be able to confirm later next week that optimism on these forums has been vindicated yet again.

    All the best,

    T.
  • foxhd
    foxhd Member Posts: 3,181

    Handicap and op.
    Thanks for the good wishes Gary. It's reassuring to know Statesside golfers are like UK golfers - I give it about three rounds before someone says 'My sprained wrist trumps the fact that you used to have cancer'.

    I hope to be able to confirm later next week that optimism on these forums has been vindicated yet again.

    All the best,

    T.

    golf
    Texas-Wedge, I was golfing in a month and a half. I have speeded up our group because every time play slows down as someone looks for a lost ball, I tell them that my life is too short to waste time looking for it. What can they say? Friend says, "Playing the cancer card,huh?" We laugh and play on.
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    foxhd said:

    golf
    Texas-Wedge, I was golfing in a month and a half. I have speeded up our group because every time play slows down as someone looks for a lost ball, I tell them that my life is too short to waste time looking for it. What can they say? Friend says, "Playing the cancer card,huh?" We laugh and play on.

    golf
    What an old fox! Thanks for the tip - I hadn't thought of milking it that way(and anything to combat slow play!!). It just goes to show you should always be ready to learn from fellow golfers.
    A month and a half from now will probably see us under snow here but if not I hope I've recovered as well as you and Garym and can be contemplating a careful return to the game.
    T.
  • garym
    garym Member Posts: 1,647

    golf
    What an old fox! Thanks for the tip - I hadn't thought of milking it that way(and anything to combat slow play!!). It just goes to show you should always be ready to learn from fellow golfers.
    A month and a half from now will probably see us under snow here but if not I hope I've recovered as well as you and Garym and can be contemplating a careful return to the game.
    T.

    golf...
    One of my best golf buddies said "Damn, now I'll have to cross you off my list of potential donors if I ever need a kidney", what a guy!!