Insulin Potentiation Therapy

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califsue
califsue Member Posts: 80
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
I was wondering if anyone has looked into IPT therapy, using insulin as a biologic response modifier to deliver lower doses of chemotherapy. You can google it - pros and cons. It is an interesting idea. Here is an excerpt.

Susan

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Chemotherapy drugs like to attack rapidly dividing cells, indiscriminately. In a tumor, not all the cancer cells are in this rapidly dividing stage all at once. They take turns. When insulin joined up with the excess of insulin-like growth-factor receptors on those cancer cells in the tissue culture, it stimulated growth in many of the cells that were not in this growth phase. This "metabolic modification by insulin" rendered more of these cells susceptible to chemotherapy attack, contributing to their increased death rate as observed in the experiment.

In Insulin Potentiation Therapy, insulin administration does cause the blood glucose to go down. This is called hypoglycemia. This hypoglycemia is an anticipated side-effect of the insulin, one rapidly and effectively controllable with intravenous glucose infusions at an appropriate time, according to the IPT protocol. The principal role insulin plays in IPT is that of a biologic response modifier. It modifies the biologic response of cancer cells in such a way that lowered doses of anticancer drugs, administered in conjunction with insulin, will kill the cancer cells more effectively. Insulin modifies the cell membrane allowing more anticancer drugs into the cell. It also modifies the growth characteristics in tumors making more of the cancer cells vulnerable to anticancer drug effects.

Due to the great excess of insulin-sensitive receptors on cancer cell membranes, we are now able to create a clear differentiation between cancer and normal cells using insulin.

Because of this important element of differentiation, along with the biologic response modification insulin produces, conventional chemotherapy drugs get targeted more specifically and more effectively inside the cancer cells only, and this can occur with the use of greatly reduced doses of these cell-killing drugs. Cancer cells die, tumors shrink, and no side-effects are caused in any other tissues. Insulin Potentiation Therapy appears to be a wonderful new way of treating cancer using nothing other than conventional chemotherapy drugs.

For more information, go to http://www.contemporarymedicine.net/ipt/ipt_main.shtml. For a list of doctors that use IPT, go to http://www.iptq.com. One pioneer of this therapy is Dr. Garcia - He has a clinic in Mexico.

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  • pascale
    pascale Member Posts: 17
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    quackery?
    Hi Susan,

    I googled IPT and found this link, which suggests it is not a trustworthy treatment:

    http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/Cancer/ipt.html

    I spend ridiculous amounts of time on the internet trying to find things that will help my mother, and I've found that site useful in the past for debunking things like Leonardis Klinik and Gerson. Maybe I'm just very cynical?

    Pascale
  • califsue
    califsue Member Posts: 80
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    pascale said:

    quackery?
    Hi Susan,

    I googled IPT and found this link, which suggests it is not a trustworthy treatment:

    http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/Cancer/ipt.html

    I spend ridiculous amounts of time on the internet trying to find things that will help my mother, and I've found that site useful in the past for debunking things like Leonardis Klinik and Gerson. Maybe I'm just very cynical?

    Pascale

    Thank you
    Thank you Pascale for checking into this for me. I've written down the link.

    Susan