Enough Sleep?

tasha_111
tasha_111 Member Posts: 2,072
edited March 2014 in Breast Cancer #1
Hy so called "Better Half" is getting well cheesed off with me for constantly sleeping. I finished chemo and rads Aug 08, Now I can sleep for England!........anywhere between 15 to 20 hours straight through without ativan. I am bloody knackered all day and just need to sleep so much.......he is being his usual caring understanding self and blaming this on me not wanting to be WITH him (Hey......Why wouldn't I?) LOL
I barely slept through chemo, I tossed and turned in pain all night on rads........maybe now is my 'Catch-Up' time......Anyone else going through this ?????????? Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Comments

  • rjjj
    rjjj Member Posts: 1,822 Member
    I am not that far yet
    Hi Julia, I'm still having chemo..although just about done, and somedays i can sleep forever and others i can't sleep a wink. But i think our body's get worn down and tell us when we need to rest. Our minds also get tired..mentally exhausted..I know i am. all of the emotions wear us down. Also are you on anything for depression? I know people with or without ca want to sleep all of the time when depressed.

    P.s. tell your OTHER (not better) half that if you were more rested maybe you would feel like being WITH him.
    luv
    jackie
  • Marcia527
    Marcia527 Member Posts: 2,729
    Yeah, tell your other half
    Yeah, tell your other half that you are dreaming about him!
  • jakeca
    jakeca Member Posts: 92
    Hmmm
    I know when I was doing chemo, I couldn't wait to go to bed at night. Not only was I tired, but I had the attitude that those hours I was asleep, were hours that I didn't have to deal with everything. I realize now that I was suffering minor depression. I made it through OK and am feeling better now. I do wonder if you are suffering depression.
  • Moopy23
    Moopy23 Member Posts: 1,751 Member
    Sleep Debt
    I think that your body builds up a sleep debt. Just consider how much sleep you lost during treatment. It is no wonder that you are still catching up.

    Are you sleeping so much that you are not participating in daily activities, or not doing things you used to do? Do you sleep so much that you miss being there for your son? Maybe any complaint of his about your sleeping too much is a better barometer of whether your sleeping is more than a physical need to rest.

    Finally, have to go along with Jackie's P.S.
  • phoenixrising
    phoenixrising Member Posts: 1,508
    You know Julia, I'm still
    You know Julia, I'm still tired a lot more than I think I should. It's been 2 yrs since my last chemo tx, so no wonder you're tired. It's a time to heal for you. Your hubby needs to know this. Some guys just don't realize that coming out with insensitive remarks isn't the way to get stuff. Good luck to you girl.
    love
    jan
  • seof
    seof Member Posts: 819 Member
    Maybe get him to read some
    Maybe get him to read some of these posts to see that you are not the only one who experiences what you are going through. Maybe look for a book or on ACS for supporters of cancer survivors so he can see what others are going through. I agree that your sleeping might be recovery from chemo, or it could be depression. Talk to your Dr., try to break up the sleeping into smaller units....schedule awake time for when you can be together, even if it is for an hour or so. If your "other" sees that you are making an effort to be awake with him occasionally, maybe he will be more patient. You may also need to talk to a professional about depression. In any case, it is most likely part of your personal recovery and will be temporary.

    Hope it helps, seof
  • djteach
    djteach Member Posts: 273
    Hi J,
    I still sleep 12 to 14

    Hi J,
    I still sleep 12 to 14 hours a day and could sleep more. I finished all of my chemo and rads. in Oct. 2005. Your body has been through a battle like none it has ever seen before and you are winning! Our body pays a price and sometimes that price is fatigue. Don't get down on yourself for healing. Sending you healing thoughts! Gentle Hugs, Donna
  • outdoorgirl
    outdoorgirl Member Posts: 1,565
    djteach said:

    Hi J,
    I still sleep 12 to 14

    Hi J,
    I still sleep 12 to 14 hours a day and could sleep more. I finished all of my chemo and rads. in Oct. 2005. Your body has been through a battle like none it has ever seen before and you are winning! Our body pays a price and sometimes that price is fatigue. Don't get down on yourself for healing. Sending you healing thoughts! Gentle Hugs, Donna

    I'm tired a lot too!
    I'm tired a lot too and I finished all of my treatment(except for tamoxifen)the end of March of 08. Sometimes I wonder if I'm sleeping too much and thats why I'm tired a lot. I know that there are some days when I feel like I don't have the energy to do much at all. And I have been feeling dizzy at times lately-I know that I havn't been drinking enough water lately,and I'm wondering if that's why I've been feeling dizzy. No headaches though!
    So ,how long is your body supposed to feel worn down for? I wonder when we can experience a little bit of normalcy physically? Maybe just a question to ask my onc!
  • lynn1950
    lynn1950 Member Posts: 2,570
    sleep
    I need lots of sleep still too.
  • tasha_111
    tasha_111 Member Posts: 2,072
    lynn1950 said:

    sleep
    I need lots of sleep still too.

    Thanks all
    I don't know why I'm just so tired, it's not at all like me, I get up in the morning and can't wait to get into the greenhouse or garden to see what has transpired overnight (so Exciting) Also a few of you mentioned depression, yes, hit the nail on the head there, I've been through a few antidepressants and they all made me feel worse (Maybe that's how they work?...Make you feel good when you STOP taking 'em?) LOL Anyway my luverly doc has me on zoloft now and I'm getting on just great with it, i can almost think straight, the dizzy spells have gone and my mood has lifted no end. Thank you all for your helpful comments (Marcia...) and support. Huge Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • phoenixrising
    phoenixrising Member Posts: 1,508
    tasha_111 said:

    Thanks all
    I don't know why I'm just so tired, it's not at all like me, I get up in the morning and can't wait to get into the greenhouse or garden to see what has transpired overnight (so Exciting) Also a few of you mentioned depression, yes, hit the nail on the head there, I've been through a few antidepressants and they all made me feel worse (Maybe that's how they work?...Make you feel good when you STOP taking 'em?) LOL Anyway my luverly doc has me on zoloft now and I'm getting on just great with it, i can almost think straight, the dizzy spells have gone and my mood has lifted no end. Thank you all for your helpful comments (Marcia...) and support. Huge Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Julia, I don't know if you
    Julia, I don't know if you are aware of this or not but the anti-depressant you are on can inhibit the Tamoxifen rendering it less effective. SSRI's inhibit the enzyme needed to metabolize Tamoxifen. There are other antidepressants that do not influence the metabolism.
    Effexor (venlafaxine) is one that is common among bc patients. This is an article that you might find interesting. I am glad you are feeling better. The whole world changes doesn't it?

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/19108.php


    Common antidepressants (SSRIs) lower effects of tamoxifen in many women
    Main Category: Women's Health / Gynecology
    Article Date: 21 Jan 2005 - 5:00 PDT

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------





    Indianapolis, USA - Additional evidence that a class of antidepressants can reduce the effectiveness of tamoxifen has been published by researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine, the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University.

    Results of the trial are published in the January 5 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

    The large clinical trial confirmed data from an earlier study showing that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants may hinder the effectiveness of tamoxifen, a drug commonly administered to breast cancer patients. The study also reports that researchers now have pinpointed genetic types that are linked with this effect.

    Led by David Flockhart, M.D., Ph.D., an IU professor of medicine and director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology, the researchers examined the effects of SSRIs in women who were prescribed tamoxifen to treat the common side effects of breast cancer therapy which include depression and hot flashes.

    More than a fourth of the women enrolled in this study were prescribed SSRIs. The study showed that the various SSRIs taken by the women have different effects on the amount of active tamoxifen byproducts in their blood.

    "This is important because previous studies have shown that when tamoxifen is broken down, the resulting molecules are extremely powerful at blocking estrogen receptors and thereby exert a cancer-inhibitive effect," said Dr. Flockhart.

    "We have withheld clinical recommendations, because at this point we don't have final data," said Dr. Flockhart. The study makes clear that knowledge of a drug's ability to inhibit CYP2D6 enzyme activity may help clinicians anticipate important drug interactions. Genetic testing may help identify a group of women who may experience greater benefit from tamoxifen or those who may benefit more from one SSRI than another, he said.

    This study is the first large-scale clinical trial to determine the influence of multiple genetic variations and drug interactions on the plasma concentrations of tamoxifen and its active metabolites.

    "We can see the light at the end of the tunnel," said Dr. Flockhart. "Using our pharmacogenetic tool kit, we are very close to being able to identify which women should be given which drug to treat her depression or hot flashes."

    This study was funded by the Pharmacogenetics Research Network of the National Institutes of Health.

    PR Staff - [email protected]
    Indiana University
  • tasha_111
    tasha_111 Member Posts: 2,072

    Julia, I don't know if you
    Julia, I don't know if you are aware of this or not but the anti-depressant you are on can inhibit the Tamoxifen rendering it less effective. SSRI's inhibit the enzyme needed to metabolize Tamoxifen. There are other antidepressants that do not influence the metabolism.
    Effexor (venlafaxine) is one that is common among bc patients. This is an article that you might find interesting. I am glad you are feeling better. The whole world changes doesn't it?

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/19108.php


    Common antidepressants (SSRIs) lower effects of tamoxifen in many women
    Main Category: Women's Health / Gynecology
    Article Date: 21 Jan 2005 - 5:00 PDT

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------





    Indianapolis, USA - Additional evidence that a class of antidepressants can reduce the effectiveness of tamoxifen has been published by researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine, the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University.

    Results of the trial are published in the January 5 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

    The large clinical trial confirmed data from an earlier study showing that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants may hinder the effectiveness of tamoxifen, a drug commonly administered to breast cancer patients. The study also reports that researchers now have pinpointed genetic types that are linked with this effect.

    Led by David Flockhart, M.D., Ph.D., an IU professor of medicine and director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology, the researchers examined the effects of SSRIs in women who were prescribed tamoxifen to treat the common side effects of breast cancer therapy which include depression and hot flashes.

    More than a fourth of the women enrolled in this study were prescribed SSRIs. The study showed that the various SSRIs taken by the women have different effects on the amount of active tamoxifen byproducts in their blood.

    "This is important because previous studies have shown that when tamoxifen is broken down, the resulting molecules are extremely powerful at blocking estrogen receptors and thereby exert a cancer-inhibitive effect," said Dr. Flockhart.

    "We have withheld clinical recommendations, because at this point we don't have final data," said Dr. Flockhart. The study makes clear that knowledge of a drug's ability to inhibit CYP2D6 enzyme activity may help clinicians anticipate important drug interactions. Genetic testing may help identify a group of women who may experience greater benefit from tamoxifen or those who may benefit more from one SSRI than another, he said.

    This study is the first large-scale clinical trial to determine the influence of multiple genetic variations and drug interactions on the plasma concentrations of tamoxifen and its active metabolites.

    "We can see the light at the end of the tunnel," said Dr. Flockhart. "Using our pharmacogenetic tool kit, we are very close to being able to identify which women should be given which drug to treat her depression or hot flashes."

    This study was funded by the Pharmacogenetics Research Network of the National Institutes of Health.

    PR Staff - [email protected]
    Indiana University

    WOW
    Jan. Thanks, I had NO IDEA about this, I didn't get along with effexor or prozac or cypramil..zoloft is fine but not if it's screwing up my chances of survival (Yeah how depressing is that?) I'll get on to my onc first thing in the morning and ask about this. Thanks for pointing it out. Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxxx