Now I'm mad as hell

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Starleen
Starleen Member Posts: 40 Member
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
I was diagnosed with advanced colorectal cancer when I was 38. I'm now 40. I got lucky (so far) and it was caught at stage III. I had a met to one node nearest to the 6cm tumor. Chemo, surgery, more chemo seemed to have worked, and it was by luck alone that this didn't kill me. Simply, it was caught in time. Symptoms brought me to the doctor, not regular screening. As we all know, by the time you have symptoms, it's bad. I am angry. Younger people are dying of this because colon cancer screening is not part of a 30-50 year old's well exam. So ironic that older folks have a better chance (no offense to you older folks) than the youngsters. A colonoscopy without symptoms on a 38 year old is voluntary thus insurance may not cover it. It isn't part of a well exam. Compounded by the reality that no one really wants to talk about or submit themselves to an **** exam unless they have to. Had it been a mandatory part of a yearly physical, my cancer--and many others' cancer--would have been detected at an earlier stage, greatly increasing the chance of survival.

That damn node is going to be a monster in my closet for the rest of my life, all because it is assumed that colorectal cancer is a disease of people over 50. Go look up colon cancer on Facebook and read how many friends and relatives have lost their under-50 loved ones to this curable disease.

I wrote my Congressman. What else can I do? I'm pissed off enough to storm The White House.

Comments

  • Shayenne
    Shayenne Member Posts: 2,342
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    I agree....
    My gyno said I didn't need a colonoscopy because I wasn't 50, so I was diagnosed at Stage 4 colon cancer (didn't need surgery, no blockages, is a mass on the wall) and a tumor in my liver, I was dx'd at 43, I am now 44, because I just had a birthday last month, but this was just a couple months ago, and upset that I never even felt sick or had pain, and no symptoms whatsoever, now I have hope that I can get through this, I don't think it's ever too late to get this beast, I have faith, there's alot of people that died with it, but there's also alot of people out there living with it, so I hope to stay hopeful that we all beat this, medicine has come a long way.

    I do agree we need screenings earlier, I am hearing alot of people being diagnosed wayyyy before 50~

    ~Donna
  • Starleen
    Starleen Member Posts: 40 Member
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    Shayenne said:

    I agree....
    My gyno said I didn't need a colonoscopy because I wasn't 50, so I was diagnosed at Stage 4 colon cancer (didn't need surgery, no blockages, is a mass on the wall) and a tumor in my liver, I was dx'd at 43, I am now 44, because I just had a birthday last month, but this was just a couple months ago, and upset that I never even felt sick or had pain, and no symptoms whatsoever, now I have hope that I can get through this, I don't think it's ever too late to get this beast, I have faith, there's alot of people that died with it, but there's also alot of people out there living with it, so I hope to stay hopeful that we all beat this, medicine has come a long way.

    I do agree we need screenings earlier, I am hearing alot of people being diagnosed wayyyy before 50~

    ~Donna

    Damn it, Shayenne! That
    Damn it, Shayenne! That makes me so mad! I just wrote Obama, as nutty as it sounds.

    What you said needs to be said worldwide as loud as we can yell. There is no excuse for you to be DX at stage 4 at your age. None. They only do it for people our age if there is a history in the family. I had no such history. It's random, and it needs to be on the radar. It's the 2nd largest cancer killer, for god's sake. Odds are that younger folks are getting it, and the nation seems to be more concerned about HPV than colorectal cancer. The ****. It's real. It might be diseased. Look into it, world.

    You are beautiful and strong, and with your faith and an attitude, you'll make it. Say (excuse my French) "**** this ****!!" Medicine has come a long way. That, and the notion to yourself that no way in hell are you about to be a victim, will make you victorious over this crap. You'll get through it! Even at advanced stages, it becomes simply disease maintenance with the amazing stuff they can do now.

    I won't wish you good luck, because you don't need it, Warrior Princess. OK, maybe a little.
  • lizbiz
    lizbiz Member Posts: 120
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    I'll storm with you!
    I'm 33 years old and was diagnosed at 32 with stage 3. Chemo didn't work for me as now I'm stage 4. Although my prognosis might be better than other as I only have one liver met that's totally operable, I'm still SUPER pissed that I probably won't get to have kids, a career OR see my 40s. The idea of being on chemo for the rest of my (presumably short) life is NOT acceptable to me!

    I'm right there with you!

    Elizabeth
  • Starleen
    Starleen Member Posts: 40 Member
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    lizbiz said:

    I'll storm with you!
    I'm 33 years old and was diagnosed at 32 with stage 3. Chemo didn't work for me as now I'm stage 4. Although my prognosis might be better than other as I only have one liver met that's totally operable, I'm still SUPER pissed that I probably won't get to have kids, a career OR see my 40s. The idea of being on chemo for the rest of my (presumably short) life is NOT acceptable to me!

    I'm right there with you!

    Elizabeth

    Elizabeth, with your fight,
    Elizabeth, with your fight, I hope you will please help me and others. Your anger is so completely valid, it makes me sick. I wasn't sure about the reaction to my post, and, honestly, I'm not sure what to do now. I am only stage III at this point, so the shock of your and Donna's post has me devastated and maybe feeling a little guilty, and, again, THERE IS NO EXCUSE for the reality of the iffy-ness about your future. I almost can't cope with this reality, and it is ****. I am so thankful that yours is treatable--maybe even curable. I marvel that in our advanced society, this may kill us simply because screening was not available to us. My personal reality is the pervading thought that I might not be there when my four year old grows up, and my anger boils that this could have been detected long ago. Your own anger will be your strength. Use it!

    If either of you need to talk about anything--I mean it-- do not hesitate to contact me via traeke@law.utexas.edu. I'm working on it, and I hope I can get enough horror stories to move our nation, because this **** needs to be addressed, pronto.
  • funnyguy
    funnyguy Member Posts: 89
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    lizbiz said:

    I'll storm with you!
    I'm 33 years old and was diagnosed at 32 with stage 3. Chemo didn't work for me as now I'm stage 4. Although my prognosis might be better than other as I only have one liver met that's totally operable, I'm still SUPER pissed that I probably won't get to have kids, a career OR see my 40s. The idea of being on chemo for the rest of my (presumably short) life is NOT acceptable to me!

    I'm right there with you!

    Elizabeth

    Pile it on
    So at age 28 I had symptoms on and off...which I ignored along with my dr.
    Than a couple years later...we chalked a little blood up to stress. Can you believe it?
    Than at 38 I had strong symptoms and finally was able to get a flex sig for a possible fissure???? That's when they found a 5cm mass. which led to a full colonoscopy - which the insurance company denied payment on the first time around...because of my age even though the flex sig biopsy confirmed cancer...!

    So I am with you and shout about it, every chance I get. The most curable form of cancer if caught early enough. Yet insurance companies have deemed age 50 to be early enough.
  • fighting for mom
    fighting for mom Member Posts: 96
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    funnyguy said:

    Pile it on
    So at age 28 I had symptoms on and off...which I ignored along with my dr.
    Than a couple years later...we chalked a little blood up to stress. Can you believe it?
    Than at 38 I had strong symptoms and finally was able to get a flex sig for a possible fissure???? That's when they found a 5cm mass. which led to a full colonoscopy - which the insurance company denied payment on the first time around...because of my age even though the flex sig biopsy confirmed cancer...!

    So I am with you and shout about it, every chance I get. The most curable form of cancer if caught early enough. Yet insurance companies have deemed age 50 to be early enough.

    Ditto
    I agree- they have to get approval for the under 50s! My mom was diagnosed at 59- unfortunately even with my strong persuasion she didn't get a colonoscopy at 50. She had my Dad's scheduled when he hit 50. They may not have found her lesion then- hers was pretty fast/aggressive. But we all know the early detection is what saves lives.

    According to my insurance company- unless I have some symptoms that would deem a colonoscopy medically necessary they wouldn't pay. Now that Mom has been diagnosed I am at high risk- but I would have to pay the big bucks on my own at this point.

    I had a colonoscopy at age 27 due to some issues- it was questionable so had further tests and all clear. I don't want to risk this horrible beast because of insurance!

    My mom's colonoscopy that identified the lesion was denied the first time. Re-submitted and was paid. Why must we fight the insurance companies that are supposed to be there for us???
  • Shayenne
    Shayenne Member Posts: 2,342
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    Ditto
    I agree- they have to get approval for the under 50s! My mom was diagnosed at 59- unfortunately even with my strong persuasion she didn't get a colonoscopy at 50. She had my Dad's scheduled when he hit 50. They may not have found her lesion then- hers was pretty fast/aggressive. But we all know the early detection is what saves lives.

    According to my insurance company- unless I have some symptoms that would deem a colonoscopy medically necessary they wouldn't pay. Now that Mom has been diagnosed I am at high risk- but I would have to pay the big bucks on my own at this point.

    I had a colonoscopy at age 27 due to some issues- it was questionable so had further tests and all clear. I don't want to risk this horrible beast because of insurance!

    My mom's colonoscopy that identified the lesion was denied the first time. Re-submitted and was paid. Why must we fight the insurance companies that are supposed to be there for us???

    I'm with you!
    I would let my voice be known about this, I really want to warn people to get detected early, and Obama should do something about this, you point me in the right direction, and I'll be glad to help!

    shayskis@yahoo.com is my email, I would help!

    It's devastating how Liz won't be able to have kids because of this, and she's so young. I was talking to a 26 year old stage 4 today at the center, she's been on chemo for awhile now, and has a 3 year old boy. She was so sweet, I'd like to bring her to these boards too.. she goes to colonclub.com as well, and she even gave me her numbers and email..she looked awesome today, as she came to the center wearing a green clown wig, and green stuff just to still celebrate St. Paddy's Day, both her and her friend were wearing neat stuff..it put a smile on my face, I saw her walking to the bathroom, she looked at me, and I told her how cute she looked, after coming out of the bathroom, she came and talked to me in my room, that was so nice, to talk to someone personally face-to-face, connected to the IV just like me, I hope to see her again there.

    Hugsss on this crusade girl, and count me in, this pisses me off too!

    ~Donna
  • snommintj
    snommintj Member Posts: 601
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    Shayenne said:

    I'm with you!
    I would let my voice be known about this, I really want to warn people to get detected early, and Obama should do something about this, you point me in the right direction, and I'll be glad to help!

    shayskis@yahoo.com is my email, I would help!

    It's devastating how Liz won't be able to have kids because of this, and she's so young. I was talking to a 26 year old stage 4 today at the center, she's been on chemo for awhile now, and has a 3 year old boy. She was so sweet, I'd like to bring her to these boards too.. she goes to colonclub.com as well, and she even gave me her numbers and email..she looked awesome today, as she came to the center wearing a green clown wig, and green stuff just to still celebrate St. Paddy's Day, both her and her friend were wearing neat stuff..it put a smile on my face, I saw her walking to the bathroom, she looked at me, and I told her how cute she looked, after coming out of the bathroom, she came and talked to me in my room, that was so nice, to talk to someone personally face-to-face, connected to the IV just like me, I hope to see her again there.

    Hugsss on this crusade girl, and count me in, this pisses me off too!

    ~Donna

    Don't get mad, help is on the way. Maybe...
    A national healthcare plan should remedy the whole age limit for a colonoscopy. As for being mad. You can't get mad at luck, whether it be good or bad. You just have to roll with it. Of the billions of cells that have lived in my body, I had one dumb cell that decided to go all gangsta on me. I really can't blame it though. It was only doing what I'm trying to do now, survive. See, most cells have a specific life cycle, then they commit suicide, its called apoptosis. When a cell decides it's not gonna take itself out, then you get a cancer cell. Cancer cells replicate like every other cell, but the first cancer cell talks all of his buddies into not committing suicide either. So then you just have a bunch of rogue cells taking up space. If you need the space they are occupying then that's when you have a problem. So I can't really blame the cancer for wanting to survive. But I can't have a bunch of freeloaders hanging around. Sooner or later one of those guys is gonna do something stupid and then I'm toast. I'm going to sleep and I'm about to do something I've done every night since my diagnosis. Aloud and in a soft but firm voice, I'm going to try to reason with my cancer cells. I tell them that I understand their plight. I thank them for picking me rather than my family. I ask them what their plans are. I ask about their future. Then I tell them what will happen if they continue to hang out and multiply. I tell them that if I die so will they. I ask them to look around and see how much fun all the other cells are having. I point out the benefits of leading a useful life. Then I tell them I know they're scared of dying, so am I, but every living being has a cycle and they need to choose theirs. I believe this helps. Probably not with the cancer but with my anger.
  • PhillieG
    PhillieG Member Posts: 4,866 Member
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    CHARGE
    I was DX at 46 during a routine yearly exam by my PCP who was an Oncologist (if you can believe that) He found it through blood work, my liver functions were high. All of a sudden I was Stage IV colon cancer. I really wasn't symptomatic at all and if I had early screening I might have caught it sooner. After going through MAJOR problem with my former Onc/PCP we left on less than good terms, he was in no hurry to get me started on chemo or anything because as he put it "you've had this for a while". Why the F#ck didn't you catch it then since I was going yearly to you???
    Funny thing, a few weeks ago was my 5 year anniversary of living with cancer and numb nuts sends me a notice last week that it's time for a colonoscopy.
    As you can tell, I've let it go...
  • dorookie
    dorookie Member Posts: 1,731 Member
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    It would make a difference
    I talked to my health care case worker from Aetna yesterday. She was telling me that the CEO of Aetna has been chosen to help with Prez Obama's new health care reform. I thought that was interesting. I asked her to do me a favor. I suggested that she write amemo or an email to her CEO. I told her that he should be plugging the fact that this beast is affecting so many new people and so so many new people that are much younger then 50, well being a nurse she agreed. I asked her to relay to him how much money his own insurance would save if they would either lower the age for a colonocopy or stop making it so hard to get one because of age. Not only does this save them money (always a good way to approach a CEO), but most importantly it saves lives. It save others from having to go through the hell some of us have had to endure.

    Lets just hope she does it, or if others want to write to the CEO of Aetna that couldnt hurt either. I dont know his name but I am sure we could find out with an address. Just food for thought. Might get a bit more attention then writing the white house.

    God Bless
    Beth
  • shmurciakova
    shmurciakova Member Posts: 906 Member
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    one more
    I was diagnosed at age 31 which at the time they thought was Stage III, turned out to be Stage IV. I had rectal bleeding from the age of 26 which everyone chalked up to hemmeroids. It didn't help that I also only seemed to have the bleeding when I was stressed out about something. Then one month I started having it every day which is when I finally told my GP about it who scheduled my colonoscopy.
    So, it isn't only the fact that the guidelines say 50, it is the fact that NO one seems to even consider colon cancer in young people as a possibility! I certainly didn't. I even remember watching Katie Couric on TV getting her colonoscopy and thinking "Why are they showing that?" TMI!, but now I wish I had paid very close attention. The bottom line is that people aren't comfortable talking about it - when we become as comfortable with our bowels as we are with our breasts we will see a change.
    My best friends husband just got a colonoscopy because he has had a fissure and rectal bleeding and just wanted to be sure. They found 5 polyps (none cancerous thankfully), but he is only 35 or so!
    Alas!
    Susan H.
  • dorookie
    dorookie Member Posts: 1,731 Member
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    one more
    I was diagnosed at age 31 which at the time they thought was Stage III, turned out to be Stage IV. I had rectal bleeding from the age of 26 which everyone chalked up to hemmeroids. It didn't help that I also only seemed to have the bleeding when I was stressed out about something. Then one month I started having it every day which is when I finally told my GP about it who scheduled my colonoscopy.
    So, it isn't only the fact that the guidelines say 50, it is the fact that NO one seems to even consider colon cancer in young people as a possibility! I certainly didn't. I even remember watching Katie Couric on TV getting her colonoscopy and thinking "Why are they showing that?" TMI!, but now I wish I had paid very close attention. The bottom line is that people aren't comfortable talking about it - when we become as comfortable with our bowels as we are with our breasts we will see a change.
    My best friends husband just got a colonoscopy because he has had a fissure and rectal bleeding and just wanted to be sure. They found 5 polyps (none cancerous thankfully), but he is only 35 or so!
    Alas!
    Susan H.

    I hear ya
    I dont see why doctors arent more pro screening. This crap about it being an old persons fight is just crazy. I think here on this board we have proved that there are more young people getting it then older ones. I would bet that here on this borad there are more people under the age of 45 getting the beast then over 50. What do we have to do to make someone listen. That one simple little procedure would save so many lives and so much money for the insurances and doctors, or is that why they dont do it? Is it really about the money? Some people say that there is a cure for cancer, but if it got out, think of all the people that would be out of work, or would loose so much money. Some say the pharmacutical (sp) people would be hit the hardest and they dont want that to happen. Same thing about AIDS, they can control it now, its no longer a death sentense as long as people take the prescribed drugs, hense the pharmacutical people stay rich...okay enough on my soap box, but thats how I feel.

    Beth
  • CherylHutch
    CherylHutch Member Posts: 1,375 Member
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    dorookie said:

    I hear ya
    I dont see why doctors arent more pro screening. This crap about it being an old persons fight is just crazy. I think here on this board we have proved that there are more young people getting it then older ones. I would bet that here on this borad there are more people under the age of 45 getting the beast then over 50. What do we have to do to make someone listen. That one simple little procedure would save so many lives and so much money for the insurances and doctors, or is that why they dont do it? Is it really about the money? Some people say that there is a cure for cancer, but if it got out, think of all the people that would be out of work, or would loose so much money. Some say the pharmacutical (sp) people would be hit the hardest and they dont want that to happen. Same thing about AIDS, they can control it now, its no longer a death sentense as long as people take the prescribed drugs, hense the pharmacutical people stay rich...okay enough on my soap box, but thats how I feel.

    Beth

    Conspiracy Theories
    I'm going to chime in here with some of my rambling thoughts on the matter... in no particular order. But will give the Devil's Advocate perspective... not saying it's right but it is a different perspective ;)

    1) There are a lot of conspiracy theories out there about there being a cure for all cancers but the drug/medical industry would be hit big time, hence it's all about money. But I do think this is a conspiracy theory that has been around for a long time (I used to be one of the ones who did believe this too). The reason I now think that it is just a conspiracy theory... think about how many people would have had to be involved in finding the "cure"... be it cancer or AIDS or any other terminal disease. It never is just ONE person who finds the answer... and therefore the medical industry and pharmaceutical industry can somehow bump him off and keep his cure a big secret. When something as huge as a cure is found, there are MANY MANY researchers involved, sometimes different countries working on the same research. Then there are the tests and trials to figure out if their findings really are as positive as they think. There is no way the American pharmaceutical industry could manage to shut up all these researchers from around the world. There would definitely be a leak.. not to mention a leak about the coverup ;) One has to remember... the so called bad guys (the pharmaceuticals who are in it for the big $$$) are human too and just as many of them (or loved ones) have cancers, and other terminal diseases.

    2) Making it mandatory (or an option) for getting a colonoscopy before 50. I have two perspectives here... from the medical/insurance point of view and then from a young person. Yes, when you look at the ratio of posters posting here on these boards (and other website boards) it is shocking how young some of the folk here are. I consider myself young, but hey, I was 52 when I was DX'd and after my surgery, my surgeon said from the size of the tumour, I had had it for at least 10 years. Had I gotten a colonoscopy in my late 30s or early 40s, they would have caught it at the Stage 1 phase.... but it never even dawned on me to ask for a colonoscopy. As a matter of fact, I think I was 49 or so before I had even heard the term or knew what one was!! So from a young (in my case, older and should have known more about it), when you have no symptoms and your overall health is totally fine, how many of us would say, "But I INSIST on having a colonoscopy!" I would have said, "No thanks... if it's not broke, let's not assume it's going to break" ;)

    From a medical/insurance perspective... although a colonoscopy is a simple procedure for anyone going through it (other than the prep... that can be a little evil), there are risks involved. The risk of perforating the intestine... which does not happen a lot, but it is certainly not uncommon. So much so that they make you sign a document which you acknowledge you know the risk. Should the surgeon accidently perforate the intestine, this will cause great pain and almost guaranteed an internal infection. So from a medical POV, I can see them saying "Let's not do any unnecessary procedures unless there appears to be a reason for it". From an insurance POV, I'm sure it is all about money... if the doctors feel it's not necessary because of the potential risk (weighing risks vs benefits), then the insurance companies are not going to say, "Oh to heck with the cost... free colonoscopies for everyone!"

    So, although I can understand the above arguments, what really blows me away is a lot of us (I'm talking colon cancer folk here) had the exact same complaints of abdominal pain, throwing up yet not having a bug of any kind, normal blood work results, little or nothing in the fecal tests, nothing showing up when an ultra-sound is done. In other words, they couldn't find anything to explain the pain... but the pain was there... definitely in the area of the colon or intestine. So why don't they suggest doing a colonoscopy immediately rather than say, "Well, there's nothing wrong with you... all your tests come back normal"?? Or my favourite is, you have a CAT Scan and low and behold the CT shows a section of inflamed intestine/colon. Without checking any further, my gastro said, "Aha! Just as I had thought... Diverticulitis!" I've heard others on these boards who were misdiagnosed as diverticulitis (inflammation of the intestine) when it turned out to be cancer. So with all these misdiagnosis, or not getting any results from the standard tests... why don't they automatically do a colonoscopy. And that's only for those who have symptoms/pain before DX.

    Hugggggs,

    Cheryl
  • nanagrandma
    nanagrandma Member Posts: 40
    Options

    Conspiracy Theories
    I'm going to chime in here with some of my rambling thoughts on the matter... in no particular order. But will give the Devil's Advocate perspective... not saying it's right but it is a different perspective ;)

    1) There are a lot of conspiracy theories out there about there being a cure for all cancers but the drug/medical industry would be hit big time, hence it's all about money. But I do think this is a conspiracy theory that has been around for a long time (I used to be one of the ones who did believe this too). The reason I now think that it is just a conspiracy theory... think about how many people would have had to be involved in finding the "cure"... be it cancer or AIDS or any other terminal disease. It never is just ONE person who finds the answer... and therefore the medical industry and pharmaceutical industry can somehow bump him off and keep his cure a big secret. When something as huge as a cure is found, there are MANY MANY researchers involved, sometimes different countries working on the same research. Then there are the tests and trials to figure out if their findings really are as positive as they think. There is no way the American pharmaceutical industry could manage to shut up all these researchers from around the world. There would definitely be a leak.. not to mention a leak about the coverup ;) One has to remember... the so called bad guys (the pharmaceuticals who are in it for the big $$$) are human too and just as many of them (or loved ones) have cancers, and other terminal diseases.

    2) Making it mandatory (or an option) for getting a colonoscopy before 50. I have two perspectives here... from the medical/insurance point of view and then from a young person. Yes, when you look at the ratio of posters posting here on these boards (and other website boards) it is shocking how young some of the folk here are. I consider myself young, but hey, I was 52 when I was DX'd and after my surgery, my surgeon said from the size of the tumour, I had had it for at least 10 years. Had I gotten a colonoscopy in my late 30s or early 40s, they would have caught it at the Stage 1 phase.... but it never even dawned on me to ask for a colonoscopy. As a matter of fact, I think I was 49 or so before I had even heard the term or knew what one was!! So from a young (in my case, older and should have known more about it), when you have no symptoms and your overall health is totally fine, how many of us would say, "But I INSIST on having a colonoscopy!" I would have said, "No thanks... if it's not broke, let's not assume it's going to break" ;)

    From a medical/insurance perspective... although a colonoscopy is a simple procedure for anyone going through it (other than the prep... that can be a little evil), there are risks involved. The risk of perforating the intestine... which does not happen a lot, but it is certainly not uncommon. So much so that they make you sign a document which you acknowledge you know the risk. Should the surgeon accidently perforate the intestine, this will cause great pain and almost guaranteed an internal infection. So from a medical POV, I can see them saying "Let's not do any unnecessary procedures unless there appears to be a reason for it". From an insurance POV, I'm sure it is all about money... if the doctors feel it's not necessary because of the potential risk (weighing risks vs benefits), then the insurance companies are not going to say, "Oh to heck with the cost... free colonoscopies for everyone!"

    So, although I can understand the above arguments, what really blows me away is a lot of us (I'm talking colon cancer folk here) had the exact same complaints of abdominal pain, throwing up yet not having a bug of any kind, normal blood work results, little or nothing in the fecal tests, nothing showing up when an ultra-sound is done. In other words, they couldn't find anything to explain the pain... but the pain was there... definitely in the area of the colon or intestine. So why don't they suggest doing a colonoscopy immediately rather than say, "Well, there's nothing wrong with you... all your tests come back normal"?? Or my favourite is, you have a CAT Scan and low and behold the CT shows a section of inflamed intestine/colon. Without checking any further, my gastro said, "Aha! Just as I had thought... Diverticulitis!" I've heard others on these boards who were misdiagnosed as diverticulitis (inflammation of the intestine) when it turned out to be cancer. So with all these misdiagnosis, or not getting any results from the standard tests... why don't they automatically do a colonoscopy. And that's only for those who have symptoms/pain before DX.

    Hugggggs,

    Cheryl

    colonoscopy
    I had been to the dr.and dx.with ulceritive colitus in beginning of 06.the medicine the dr. had me on wasn't doing much for me so in nov. of 06 i had a colonoscopy. The dr.made me have a barrium ennama becuase there was a blockage but did nothing about it just increased the dose of the medicine. I had a papsmear in may of 07. The test result came back showing i had cancer which they thought might be ovarian.I went to a obgyn oncologist who scheduled me for surgery and when they did the surgery they found it was stage 3 colon cancer. Sometimes a
    having a colonoscopy doesn't always find it if the dr. doesn't look into things. I do think it's a good idea to have them at an earlier age though.
  • Julie 44
    Julie 44 Member Posts: 476 Member
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    colonoscopy
    I had been to the dr.and dx.with ulceritive colitus in beginning of 06.the medicine the dr. had me on wasn't doing much for me so in nov. of 06 i had a colonoscopy. The dr.made me have a barrium ennama becuase there was a blockage but did nothing about it just increased the dose of the medicine. I had a papsmear in may of 07. The test result came back showing i had cancer which they thought might be ovarian.I went to a obgyn oncologist who scheduled me for surgery and when they did the surgery they found it was stage 3 colon cancer. Sometimes a
    having a colonoscopy doesn't always find it if the dr. doesn't look into things. I do think it's a good idea to have them at an earlier age though.

    ADD ME TO THE LIST
    I am 45 years old. Found out I had colon cancer 5 months ago and only because I had pain..Had 9 out of 19 lymph nodes positive. Plus a tumor that I had to have a resection for..Doing 12 rounds of chemo..UGGG Add me to the list to fight for earlier testing..Let me know if I can help in ANY way.
  • jillpls
    jillpls Member Posts: 238
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    word must go out
    The message about early screening must also go to the drs. They seem not to even mention it until you are in your 50's. My dr didn't even mention the word colonoscopy when I was 48 and seeing her for rectal bleeding. I assumed hemorrhoids were the problem and so did she. Two years later I have stage III with reoccurrance. I work at a high school so I've twice given "my story" to health classes to let the student know. Hopefully they'll pass it on to their parents and also remember for themselves. People need to be open to talk ab out that part of the anatomy. The more we talk about it the more others will be willing to open up. Keep talking and being mad!
  • chynabear
    chynabear Member Posts: 481 Member
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    I'm with ya!
    I was diagnosed 4 1/2 years ago the day after I turned 27 with Stage III, same as you, jumped to the node closest to the cancer.

    I had my first symptom when I was 22 or 23 and was told it was hemmorhoids (however you spell that nasty word). I finally progressed to many symptoms when I was 26 and had to FIGHT to see a gastro and go doctor to doctor until I was sent. The irony is that an inexperienced and straight out of medical school doctor is who finally sent me. Luckily, she was not so easy to give me a "diagnoses" without further testing. Sadly, even my gastro (another young guy) came to see me in the hospital with tears in his eyes and said the he was so sorry that even he didn't take me seriously and only agreed to do the scope because I so obviously needed peace of mind. He swore to me that he would never practice medicine the same again and asked if he could use my story. I told him he could shout it from rooftops if it got younger people screened.

    I was mad as hell too, but never knew where or how to effectively direct my anger.

    I hope to see the day when screening ages are dropped. Maybe then we wouldn't be where we are today.

    Patricia