Am I employable?

tasha_111
tasha_111 Member Posts: 2,072
edited March 2014 in Breast Cancer #1
I need to earn money, but what can I do? I can't even do my own housework, never mind working for a nearby motel cleaning rooms!.. What can I do? .......... Jxxxxxxxxx

Comments

  • EveningStar2
    EveningStar2 Member Posts: 491 Member
    work?

    You might be surprised what you can do. Conversely, what are you capable of, right now, that could make you employable? Answer phones? Data entry? Then, is there anyone in your area hiring? Job hunting sucks right now--I know because I am. Also, can you apply for social services, food stamps, etc? Is there a program in your area that helps breast cancer survivors during treatment?

    Good luck

    Maureen
  • Aortus
    Aortus Member Posts: 967
    Collections?
    Nobody ever wants to work in collections... too depressing, don't want to be nasty for a living, whatever. It's not the most fun job in the world. But the few of my students who have gone on to work in collections have done very well for themselves. I think that with your language skills, unique personality, and ability to laugh at yourself you would be very good at it.

    And for once, Tasha, I am being 100% serious. Sometime you should ask Moopy how often that happens.
  • Marcia527
    Marcia527 Member Posts: 2,729
    what do you like doing, skills
    They tell you to ask yourself if you had a million dollars what would you do? It is supposed to determine what you would be happy doing if money is not an issue. Some people turn hobbies into income.
  • divablu
    divablu Member Posts: 75
    Yes, you are employable! As
    Yes, you are employable! As everyone has said, what are your skills and where do they fit.

    Go to your local job services office. Call friends. Go to temporary job agencies

    I have been concerned about my employability. Now I'm in radiation, I drive 40 minutes each way for a 15 min. procedure ... How could I go to a new employer and tell them I need half a day off for treatment! Anyway, I went to a local job agency and got a weekend job, only 4 hours a day, Sat & Sun, which is all I can physicall do right now, and I'm having a blast cooking dinner for 8 senior citizens in an assisted living home. By my resume, I'm WAY (and I do mean WAY) over qualified to be a part-time cook, but I'm out there and it's a beginning.

    So, another new beginning is just waiting for you!
  • Moopy23
    Moopy23 Member Posts: 1,751 Member
    Yes!
    Tasha, I would consider the largest employers where you live. They are more likely to have a range of positions and more likely hiring these days. Check out the area unemployment center; usually, there will be informational materials and resources to help you match your interests/experience to specific jobs. Check newspapers for hiring events, where various employers show up.

    Also, what are some places you like to go, as far as your interests and hobbies and pastimes? For example, Joe and I go to bookstores all the time. If I needed a job, I would inquire at them. Also, let everyone know you are looking for a job. Many times, a friend, family member, or neighbor or even just acquaintance will know of an opening. My hair stylist (back when I had hair, weeeping now) was a great resource for me. Any time I was not happy at my job, she would always tell me about this or that other client who worked at X place and could use someone like me. I never changed jobs, but it was good to know she could refer me to an area business owner or manager or just someone who worked somewhere that was hiring. So, anyone you know who works with the public can be a good source.

    You ARE employable. You can do more than you think. From your posts, we all know that you are bright, articulate, empathetic, and have a great sense of humor. Not to mention the whole cancer thing: you are a survivor, and that means you are strong and resilient and courageous. All of those are qualities valuable in any position.
  • Joycelouise
    Joycelouise Member Posts: 482
    Try checking with your local
    Try checking with your local school districts. They hire para educators. You don't need a degree or credential. You work in the classroom with the teacher. In my district, which is court schools and severly handicapped youngsters they ALWAYS need subs. You can work on the days you like or can, or, you can apply for a permanent position when one comes up. Sometimes you can find these jobs on edjoin.edu or .com or .org (I think that is the site) Good, complete bennies. By the way, as a C survivor you are in a protected class. It is illegal to discriminate against you based on your medical history. Best luck! (The pay is about $15 and hour to start, not huge, but with the bennies... and you get to join a union for job stability)
    love, Joyce
  • Marcia527
    Marcia527 Member Posts: 2,729

    Try checking with your local
    Try checking with your local school districts. They hire para educators. You don't need a degree or credential. You work in the classroom with the teacher. In my district, which is court schools and severly handicapped youngsters they ALWAYS need subs. You can work on the days you like or can, or, you can apply for a permanent position when one comes up. Sometimes you can find these jobs on edjoin.edu or .com or .org (I think that is the site) Good, complete bennies. By the way, as a C survivor you are in a protected class. It is illegal to discriminate against you based on your medical history. Best luck! (The pay is about $15 and hour to start, not huge, but with the bennies... and you get to join a union for job stability)
    love, Joyce

    It might be illegal to
    It might be illegal to discriminate but most won't tell you that's why they aren't hiring. I read articles that tell you not to tell them you have a medical condition as long as you are physically able to do the job. I was told not to lift more than 25 pounds with my missing lymph node side arm. That disqualifies heavy lifting jobs.
  • rjjj
    rjjj Member Posts: 1,822 Member
    You would be so loved
    Hi Tash! Have you ever thought of working at a Nursing home or with people with disabilities? I find this very rewarding. I was a CNA but can't lift now, So i went into activities. Working with these people makes me know there are lots of sweet souls with problems worse than mine. And they are so friendly and grateful for the time you spend with them trying to cheer them up. It takes my mind off my own situation..it is always uplifting to do something nice for others. With your sense of humor and personality i'm sure you would be so loved by all. Hope your having a good day and wishing you lotsa luck!
    Jackie
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    Jobs
    Sure you are employable! My husband has gotten both of his jobs since we moved to DC from the online job section of our local paper, the Washington Post. Your city or town paper is a great resource. Also, I would second the idea to sign up at a temporary employment agency. I got through a few years after college with those. That can lead to a permanent job and will also give you variety. Good luck. Anyplace would be lucky to have you.

    Mimi
  • tasha_111
    tasha_111 Member Posts: 2,072
    mimivac said:

    Jobs
    Sure you are employable! My husband has gotten both of his jobs since we moved to DC from the online job section of our local paper, the Washington Post. Your city or town paper is a great resource. Also, I would second the idea to sign up at a temporary employment agency. I got through a few years after college with those. That can lead to a permanent job and will also give you variety. Good luck. Anyplace would be lucky to have you.

    Mimi

    So Helpful
    WOW... Thank you all for your glowing references (I'll include them in my resume/CV) Unfortunately, my previous life was mainly dedicated to horses and I just havn't got the physical strength or the mental stamina to do that anymore. I do, however, enjoy working with disabled people, so this is an avenue I will pursue. Also, receptionist/telephone work might be OK (They all go nuts for my english accent here LOL) Thank you for all the suggestions (and the nice things you said) Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxx
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    tasha_111 said:

    So Helpful
    WOW... Thank you all for your glowing references (I'll include them in my resume/CV) Unfortunately, my previous life was mainly dedicated to horses and I just havn't got the physical strength or the mental stamina to do that anymore. I do, however, enjoy working with disabled people, so this is an avenue I will pursue. Also, receptionist/telephone work might be OK (They all go nuts for my english accent here LOL) Thank you for all the suggestions (and the nice things you said) Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxx

    Horses
    Gosh, I wonder if there's a way to combine your love of horses with your desire to work with the disabled. I've heard of places that offer horseback riding and horse care/grooming lessons to disabled persons as a means of therapy. I picture you starting a busines, Julia...
  • redriverartist
    redriverartist Member Posts: 54
    Hmmm....
    That's a great idea that mimivac had! Or maybe with your love of animals, what about a vet clinic? Or a groomer? Our vet is always looking for groomers/assistants. Sometimes when I'm playing with the shelties, I forget about what I've been through and how tired I am. Caring for someone or something else tends to make us forget about ourselves for a short time. But your attitude and outlook are terrific! Someone would surely find a treasure in hiring you. Teresa
  • seof
    seof Member Posts: 819 Member
    Here's a thought
    I think you should get that nursing home job, or job with the vet for a steady income, then start writing short stories on the side. When you become a famous, in-demand author...due to the aforementioned sense of humor and your experience with horses (who also have a sense of humor, as you know)...you can retire or start your own riding stables and hire others to do the grunt work for you.

    That's my 10-year plan for you, anyway. best wishes, seof
  • tasha_111
    tasha_111 Member Posts: 2,072
    seof said:

    Here's a thought
    I think you should get that nursing home job, or job with the vet for a steady income, then start writing short stories on the side. When you become a famous, in-demand author...due to the aforementioned sense of humor and your experience with horses (who also have a sense of humor, as you know)...you can retire or start your own riding stables and hire others to do the grunt work for you.

    That's my 10-year plan for you, anyway. best wishes, seof

    Seof
    Wow..........I now have a plan! Woohoooooooo Party time..........Thanks Luv Jxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • divablu
    divablu Member Posts: 75
    tasha_111 said:

    So Helpful
    WOW... Thank you all for your glowing references (I'll include them in my resume/CV) Unfortunately, my previous life was mainly dedicated to horses and I just havn't got the physical strength or the mental stamina to do that anymore. I do, however, enjoy working with disabled people, so this is an avenue I will pursue. Also, receptionist/telephone work might be OK (They all go nuts for my english accent here LOL) Thank you for all the suggestions (and the nice things you said) Hugs Jxxxxxxxxxxx

    Horse employment ...
    Before BC I volunteered for a therapeutic riding barn ... Google "Bitterroot Therapeutic Riding". To find these programs near you try an Google "therapeutic riding".

    Anyway, I loved working with the children and adults in the program.

    Right now, chemo brain, I don't remember the name of the national organization that has the training program for instructors, etc. When find out, I'll let you know.

    There are all sorts of options out there for you!
  • divablu
    divablu Member Posts: 75
    divablu said:

    Horse employment ...
    Before BC I volunteered for a therapeutic riding barn ... Google "Bitterroot Therapeutic Riding". To find these programs near you try an Google "therapeutic riding".

    Anyway, I loved working with the children and adults in the program.

    Right now, chemo brain, I don't remember the name of the national organization that has the training program for instructors, etc. When find out, I'll let you know.

    There are all sorts of options out there for you!

    Tasha ....
    I found the organization for training ... NARHA.org. They do the instructor training. NARHA in Denver, CO.