Bone Therapy Article in NY Times

mimivac
mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
edited March 2014 in Breast Cancer #1
Hey guys,

I wanted to give a link to this article in the NY Times today. I am very encouraged by this and will be receiving this kind of therapy after my traditional treatments end. Not that anyone is keeping track or anything, but I had a rough couple of days after chemo #3. Nothing serious and I am doing great now, but I kept away from the boards for a while because the thought of thinking about/discussing cancer was just too much for me for a while. Anyway, here's the link: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/12/health/research/12bone.html?_r=1

Mimi

Comments

  • rjjj
    rjjj Member Posts: 1,822 Member
    We Were keeping track!
    So glad to see you back on the boards and i love your new pic. you are very beautiful. I know sometimes we need a BREAK from thinking about and living every single day with this evil called cancer. I am glad you are doing good now. And hope it continues. I tried to follow your link but couldn't find it, what kind of treatment is this? Is it a clinical trial? Many Pink sisters have been wondering about you and praying for you. You are a great inspiration to our boards.....Hugs to you!
    God Bless
    Jackie
  • Aortus
    Aortus Member Posts: 967
    You're certainly looking great, Mimi
    Sorry you haven't been feeling great. Moopsy and I are both thrilled to have you back, and hope that your next infusion goes much better!

    Joe
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    rjjj said:

    We Were keeping track!
    So glad to see you back on the boards and i love your new pic. you are very beautiful. I know sometimes we need a BREAK from thinking about and living every single day with this evil called cancer. I am glad you are doing good now. And hope it continues. I tried to follow your link but couldn't find it, what kind of treatment is this? Is it a clinical trial? Many Pink sisters have been wondering about you and praying for you. You are a great inspiration to our boards.....Hugs to you!
    God Bless
    Jackie

    Oh, how very sweet!
    That totally makes my day, Jackie. I stayed away because I've been thinking too much about cancer lately and I wanted to have a week where I just did "normal" things like go to work, exercise, read, watch movies, and otherwise not think about it. Now, I am feeling better and I missed you guys! I know we are not morose on this site and the support and information are invaluable.

    Let me try again with the link:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/12/health/research/12bone.html?_r=1

    Try cutting and pasting the whole thing. If not, I will post the text.

    I love your picture too, Jackie!

    Mimi
  • phoenixrising
    phoenixrising Member Posts: 1,508
    Thanks for the article Mimi,
    Thanks for the article Mimi, I found it interesting that it states zometa is not licensed for osteoporosis, as it has been offered to me for osteoporosis. I have declined so far as I'm not sure I am comfortable with the risk of ONJ since I do need work done on my teeth and it's taking my dentist forever to get on it. I have lost some bone in my teeth and not sure what we are going to do about it. The drug makes me a little nervous because (according to the companies report) you can still get ONJ years after stopping the drug. So I don't think the study can give numbers on that. Interestingly I think the nature of the drug in preventing the formation of new blood vessels which is the action of some chemo's is the same nature that causes ONJ. However I am no doc/researcher/scientist so what do I know. I think many women will gain many years with it and that's wonderful esp if it isn't one more thing that causes hot flashes :)
    love
    jan
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143

    Thanks for the article Mimi,
    Thanks for the article Mimi, I found it interesting that it states zometa is not licensed for osteoporosis, as it has been offered to me for osteoporosis. I have declined so far as I'm not sure I am comfortable with the risk of ONJ since I do need work done on my teeth and it's taking my dentist forever to get on it. I have lost some bone in my teeth and not sure what we are going to do about it. The drug makes me a little nervous because (according to the companies report) you can still get ONJ years after stopping the drug. So I don't think the study can give numbers on that. Interestingly I think the nature of the drug in preventing the formation of new blood vessels which is the action of some chemo's is the same nature that causes ONJ. However I am no doc/researcher/scientist so what do I know. I think many women will gain many years with it and that's wonderful esp if it isn't one more thing that causes hot flashes :)
    love
    jan

    ONJ
    This is definitely a concern, Jan, especially if you are at risk for ONJ. I guess there is no free pass, and every drug has some kind of side effect. Hot flashes are annoying aren't they? I am now getting them at age 34. If my period returns after chemo (I am betting it will), I will go through menopause twice in my lifetime. What fun.

    Mimi
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    Aortus said:

    You're certainly looking great, Mimi
    Sorry you haven't been feeling great. Moopsy and I are both thrilled to have you back, and hope that your next infusion goes much better!

    Joe

    Hair!
    Thanks, Joe. I'm sure you've covered this, but there must a story behind the hair?!!

    Mimi
  • fauxma
    fauxma Member Posts: 3,577 Member
    mimivac said:

    ONJ
    This is definitely a concern, Jan, especially if you are at risk for ONJ. I guess there is no free pass, and every drug has some kind of side effect. Hot flashes are annoying aren't they? I am now getting them at age 34. If my period returns after chemo (I am betting it will), I will go through menopause twice in my lifetime. What fun.

    Mimi

    Then you can say Been there,
    Then you can say Been there, done that when you go through it again. I didn't have any menopausal symtoms or problems when I actually went through it. Now I will be starting armidex and might have all the things that I so fortunately missed. Doesn't seem fair that I dodged the bullet and now the guns been reloaded. So maybe when you actually go through menopause you won't have problems. I hope so. Again, glad you are back.
    Stef
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    fauxma said:

    Then you can say Been there,
    Then you can say Been there, done that when you go through it again. I didn't have any menopausal symtoms or problems when I actually went through it. Now I will be starting armidex and might have all the things that I so fortunately missed. Doesn't seem fair that I dodged the bullet and now the guns been reloaded. So maybe when you actually go through menopause you won't have problems. I hope so. Again, glad you are back.
    Stef

    chemopause
    I hope you are right, Stef! So far, just hot flashes so it is not horrible. My mother had very minor symptoms when she went through it in her fifties, so I hope to be the same. Maybe the armidex will not be so bad for you, since you were symptom free the first time around. I am hoping for smooth sailing for both of us.

    Mimi
  • fauxma
    fauxma Member Posts: 3,577 Member
    mimivac said:

    chemopause
    I hope you are right, Stef! So far, just hot flashes so it is not horrible. My mother had very minor symptoms when she went through it in her fifties, so I hope to be the same. Maybe the armidex will not be so bad for you, since you were symptom free the first time around. I am hoping for smooth sailing for both of us.

    Mimi

    Me too, Mimi, Me too.
    Stef

    Me too, Mimi, Me too.
    Stef
  • lynn1950
    lynn1950 Member Posts: 2,570
    A friend sent me that article today
    I read that article just before I came on to visit. I haven't researched this, but it did mention that it is the action of bi-phosphonates (spelling?!!)in Zometa that are what stops the cancer, so I wonder if Boniva and the other osteo drugs have a similar effect (since they are bi-phosphonates, as well)?
  • Chellebug
    Chellebug Member Posts: 133
    lynn1950 said:

    A friend sent me that article today
    I read that article just before I came on to visit. I haven't researched this, but it did mention that it is the action of bi-phosphonates (spelling?!!)in Zometa that are what stops the cancer, so I wonder if Boniva and the other osteo drugs have a similar effect (since they are bi-phosphonates, as well)?

    Lynn, that is one of the
    Lynn, that is one of the clinical trials that is still in progress.....of which they are awaiting the results.......which could be a few more years. The study looks at 3 different bisphosphonates (zometa aka as zolendronic acid, ibandronate and clondronate.....I don't know the more familiar names of the latter two). I'm in that trial and was randomly chosen to take zometa. But I've got about 2 1/2 more years of taking it.
  • lynn1950
    lynn1950 Member Posts: 2,570
    Chellebug said:

    Lynn, that is one of the
    Lynn, that is one of the clinical trials that is still in progress.....of which they are awaiting the results.......which could be a few more years. The study looks at 3 different bisphosphonates (zometa aka as zolendronic acid, ibandronate and clondronate.....I don't know the more familiar names of the latter two). I'm in that trial and was randomly chosen to take zometa. But I've got about 2 1/2 more years of taking it.

    Well, Chelle
    I am glad, glad, glad, glad, glad that you are in the zometa trial! Lynn