It is over

veronica
veronica Member Posts: 7
edited March 2014 in Breast Cancer #1
i have this noise in my ear is this anyway related to breast cancer. it's my left ear noise loud helllp

Comments

  • lynn1950
    lynn1950 Member Posts: 2,570
    I am happy for you.
    I'm pretty new at this too, so it will be good to read everyone's responses. From what I know, a plant based diet is best with plenty of anti-oxidants. You get those from all the different colors. Blueberries (blue), tomatoes (red), etc. I take a generic multi-vitamin and also Kirkland Calcium Citrate that has extra vitamin D, magnesium and zinc. I also put flaxseed powder on my cereal and take fish oil tabs. Anything and everything to boost your immune system. Some people swear by Shiitake mushrooms and turmeric. A good book is "What to Eat If You Have Cancer" by Maureen Keane. Best wishes, Lynn
  • veronica
    veronica Member Posts: 7
    lynn1950 said:

    I am happy for you.
    I'm pretty new at this too, so it will be good to read everyone's responses. From what I know, a plant based diet is best with plenty of anti-oxidants. You get those from all the different colors. Blueberries (blue), tomatoes (red), etc. I take a generic multi-vitamin and also Kirkland Calcium Citrate that has extra vitamin D, magnesium and zinc. I also put flaxseed powder on my cereal and take fish oil tabs. Anything and everything to boost your immune system. Some people swear by Shiitake mushrooms and turmeric. A good book is "What to Eat If You Have Cancer" by Maureen Keane. Best wishes, Lynn

    it is over
    thanks for the advise
  • mmontero38
    mmontero38 Member Posts: 1,510
    Seemed like it was never
    Seemed like it was never going to be over didn't it? Glad you are all done. I basically try to eat lots of fruits and veggies, not much red meat (maybe once a week) I take a multi-vitamin, calcium and my doctor prescribed 50,000 IU of vitamin D once a week because my count was very low. I also eat multi grain or whole wheat bread and pasta rather than processed flour. Drink lots of water even if you are done with chemo. You're body needs to stay hydrated especially if you had lymph nodes removed. I also slather on the body lotion after I take a shower. It's a great way to start the new year Veronica. Hugs, Lili
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    Congratulations!
    I'm glad your treatment is over! I also have triple negative breast cancer. My doctor said that the treatment was essentially the same, except that we will not benefit from hormonal therapy drugs such as Tamoxifen. One thing that was mentioned to me was the possibility of doing a clinical trial after treatment that uses drugs to strengthen the bones, which will help to prevent bone mets.

    I am still in treatment, but I eat a diet similar to the ones mentioned, rich in antioxidents, vegetables, whole grains, fiber, fruits, and low fat protein such as fish and chicken. I take a multi-vitamin a day and an extra supplement with calcium and Vitamin D.
    Good luck!
  • RE
    RE Member Posts: 4,591 Member
    CONGRATULATIONS
    I am so happy for you, congratulations on being done with your treatment. Now you can get back to the business of returning to good health and good times! My best to you!

    RE
  • Derbygirl
    Derbygirl Member Posts: 198
    I'm nearly triple negative
    I'm nearly triple negative (only 5% ER+) and my oncologist decided that I should take hormone therapy to get whatever benefit possible. Are you a "true" negative or a weak positive like me? After chemo I resumed a daily multi-vitamin and Calcium with Vit D. There is a triple negative survivors website called tnbcfoundation.org that you might want to visit. There is lots of information on the internet, but visit reliable sources that you can trust like ACS, Mayo Clinic, MD Anderson and Johns Hopkins websites. Good Luck.
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    Derbygirl said:

    I'm nearly triple negative
    I'm nearly triple negative (only 5% ER+) and my oncologist decided that I should take hormone therapy to get whatever benefit possible. Are you a "true" negative or a weak positive like me? After chemo I resumed a daily multi-vitamin and Calcium with Vit D. There is a triple negative survivors website called tnbcfoundation.org that you might want to visit. There is lots of information on the internet, but visit reliable sources that you can trust like ACS, Mayo Clinic, MD Anderson and Johns Hopkins websites. Good Luck.

    I agree that you should only visit reliable sources of information on this type of breast cancer. A prominent oncologist I sought for a second opinion told me that there has been "a lot of tizzy" about triple negative breast cancer in recent years, and not to look at all the junk out there. She also said that this type of cancer responds particularly well to chemotherapy. Don't worry and check with your doctor if you want to do a clinical trial such as the bone strengthening one I mentioned.

    Mimi
  • cabbott
    cabbott Member Posts: 1,039 Member
    Keep your bones strong
    Research is beginning to point out that folks with strong bones get less reoccurance and longer survival times if they get a reoccurance, so anything that builds strong bones helps. Have your primary care physician or the folks at the oncology clinic check your vitamin D level just to make sure you are okay. Don't assume that because you take supplements you are alright. Get it checked and then get advice on what to do. If you are nearing menapause, go get the bone density scan. If you are osteopenic, start asking for a bone builder like fosamax or boniva or whatever the doc recommends given your medical history. Some folks can't take either because of stomach problems, but there is an IV that might work if the pills are no good for you. Exercise daily. Make it fun and make it a habit. See your primary care person to prevent any other health problem. Get your weight under control if it is too high or too low and eat lots of veggies, whole grains, and the right kind of fats. See a nutritionalist that your oncologist likes if you want supplements or need a special diet. Most supplements unfortunately are a waste of money and many are somewhat dangerous for our health when taken in excess. For example, the ones that prevent hot flashes have an estrogen like substance in them that promotes ER+ cancer. Vitamin A supplements in smokers given to reduce their chance of lung cancer actually increased the chance they got it. Go figure! My onco will only recommend a generic multi once a day and maybe the calcium and vitamin D if I need it. He reads a lot and won't go with anything not supported by the research. I ask every time I go (I guess I want the magic cure pill!) but so far he just says to take the cheapest multi I can find and the extra calcium and vitamin D if I need it. Are you like me and wish we could do more!

    C. Abbott
  • Skybuf
    Skybuf Member Posts: 143
    mimivac said:

    Congratulations!
    I'm glad your treatment is over! I also have triple negative breast cancer. My doctor said that the treatment was essentially the same, except that we will not benefit from hormonal therapy drugs such as Tamoxifen. One thing that was mentioned to me was the possibility of doing a clinical trial after treatment that uses drugs to strengthen the bones, which will help to prevent bone mets.

    I am still in treatment, but I eat a diet similar to the ones mentioned, rich in antioxidents, vegetables, whole grains, fiber, fruits, and low fat protein such as fish and chicken. I take a multi-vitamin a day and an extra supplement with calcium and Vitamin D.
    Good luck!

    Mimivac
    You keep that positive outlook, that's what gets us thru, I have underwent a bilateral mastectomy, 17 lymph nodes were malignant and that was in 2005/6 when I did chemo and rads.
    I'm happy to hear your being looked after by your support team. I had my surgery Dec 19 /05 and chemo followed. Your so blessed to have your husband there with you looking after you...God bless you on this journey, keep your faith girl......and my prayers are with you.
    Buffy
  • mimivac
    mimivac Member Posts: 2,143
    cabbott said:

    Keep your bones strong
    Research is beginning to point out that folks with strong bones get less reoccurance and longer survival times if they get a reoccurance, so anything that builds strong bones helps. Have your primary care physician or the folks at the oncology clinic check your vitamin D level just to make sure you are okay. Don't assume that because you take supplements you are alright. Get it checked and then get advice on what to do. If you are nearing menapause, go get the bone density scan. If you are osteopenic, start asking for a bone builder like fosamax or boniva or whatever the doc recommends given your medical history. Some folks can't take either because of stomach problems, but there is an IV that might work if the pills are no good for you. Exercise daily. Make it fun and make it a habit. See your primary care person to prevent any other health problem. Get your weight under control if it is too high or too low and eat lots of veggies, whole grains, and the right kind of fats. See a nutritionalist that your oncologist likes if you want supplements or need a special diet. Most supplements unfortunately are a waste of money and many are somewhat dangerous for our health when taken in excess. For example, the ones that prevent hot flashes have an estrogen like substance in them that promotes ER+ cancer. Vitamin A supplements in smokers given to reduce their chance of lung cancer actually increased the chance they got it. Go figure! My onco will only recommend a generic multi once a day and maybe the calcium and vitamin D if I need it. He reads a lot and won't go with anything not supported by the research. I ask every time I go (I guess I want the magic cure pill!) but so far he just says to take the cheapest multi I can find and the extra calcium and vitamin D if I need it. Are you like me and wish we could do more!

    C. Abbott

    Health
    Yes, I think we all need to keep as healthy as possible through this journey. Research is beginning to show that healthier people with strong bones and weight under control fare better. That doesn't mean it's the only factor, but being healthy has so many benefits on its own, so why not? Cabbott is absolutely right about exercising. My doctor mentioned that as well, and I have read that those who exercise (and/or keep their weight down) have lower risk of recurrence than those who do not, everything else being equal. So, you can bet that I am on my elliptical machine every day that I can. I used to exercise reluctantly; now I feel that I am running for my life, literally.

    Mimi