Recently diagnosed

Options
joj56
joj56 Member Posts: 13
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
Hello anyone or everyone out there. I am 51 healthy all my life until this past July. July 25th I had surgery because my dr. thought I had ovarian cancer, turns out it originated in my colon. I had a complete hysterectomy plus 10 inches of my colon re-moved. I have stage IV colon cancer. 13 out of 28 lymph nodes positive. Drs. said they removed all the cancer they could "see".
My onc is not very encouraging, but yet I feel positive. Like my gyn/onc told me- my cancer went to my left ovary and they removed all that. I just had my first colonoscopy and it was great- no polyps, everything good.
I understand that usually stage IV the cancer has metasized usually to the liver. Not so in my case. My CT scan prior to my surgery indicated my liver, spleen, lungs, pancreas, some other parts I didn't recognize the name of were all "unremarkable" which I guess is good.
Has anyone else had stage IV with as many positive lymph nodes as me- 13 seems like a lot? Also has anyone else had a similar diagnosis.
My onc says there is not alot of research or data about metasized cancer where the affected organ was removed.
Sorry to be so lengthy, but I very much want to stay positive and beat the crap out of this cancer, but my onc had to toss out the stats which depresses me.
I will soon start the FulFox 12 session treatment and hope it is not to bad.
Thanks anyone that takes the time to read this and respond. Everyone in this group seems so nice and supportive.
Peace and good thoughts and prayers for everyone!
Jeri
«1

Comments

  • JMARIE66
    JMARIE66 Member Posts: 55
    Options
    Jeri
    My husband was

    Jeri
    My husband was diagnosed with colon cancer, stage3b. I have found so much information, support and encouragment from this web site. I come here and read the posts multiple times a day. I am always learning something new, getting excited in someones good news to report, and
    find comfort in others reaching out to others. I can tell you I have read about multiple people who have had colon resection, sometimes colon and liver resection, and sometimes even colon, liver and lung resection. From my understanding, as long as surgery is an option, go for it and get it out! I do recall reading about some woman who thought they had ovarian cancer and finding out it originated in the colon just like you. Hopefully they will check the site and reply to you soon. Best of luck and it sounds like you need a second opinion or more encouraging doctor!
  • msccolon
    msccolon Member Posts: 1,917 Member
    Options
    new diagnosis
    Jeri, welcome to the board, wish you didn't need to be here! My initial diagnosis was IIIB, 3 of 25 lymphs involved. I had the resection, and chemo. 2 years later i had to go back into surgery and they removed a tumor the size of a soccer ball (I just have to say that, for some weird reason i am proud of the size ;) ) from my right ovary. I had a full hysterectomy, including the cervix (told them i didn't want to come back in 2 years with cervical cancer!), an omentumectomy and they took my appendix while they were in there. I did chemo again, and have done chemo one more time. I have gone past 2 years since that last surgery and all scans currently show NED! So, it hasn't been fun, but it's certainly survivable! And tell your doc to read the statistics to himself, they have NOTHING to do with you! In fact, find another doctor who is more interested in treating you as a patient, not as another statitistic! God be with you and come back often! Mary
  • doris2657
    doris2657 Member Posts: 38
    Options
    stage 4 colon with mets to ovaries
    I like you was thought to have Ovarian cancerhad my 1st surgery Feb 2008,then they found a tumor in my colon my 2 surgery was march 2008,my oncologist is very possitive he says my survival chances are 85% I do 5 FU oxiliplatin and avastin I to had many Lymphnodes involved .All I can say find yourself a better oncologist,my pet scans sofar have been good what little cancer was left is gone or shrinking.Chemo has not been to bad for me nothing I can't handle my onc believes in havy pre meds for nausea,He did tell me I would be on 5FU and Avastin for the rest of my life I can handle that.If there is anything I can help you with let me know.God bless you.

    Doris in Texas
  • polarprincess
    polarprincess Member Posts: 202 Member
    Options
    hi
    I am confused why spread to ovaries would be stage IV and not stage III b or c. Aren't ovaries considered nearby organs?
    Stage III

    Stage III colon cancer is divided into stage IIIA, stage IIIB, and stage IIIC.

    Stage IIIA: Cancer has spread from the innermost tissue layer of the colon wall to the middle layers and has spread to as many as 3 lymph nodes.
    Stage IIIB: Cancer has spread to as many as 3 nearby lymph nodes and has spread:
    beyond the middle tissue layers of the colon wall; or
    to nearby tissues around the colon or rectum; or
    beyond the colon wall into nearby organs and/or through the peritoneum.
    Stage IIIC: Cancer has spread to 4 or more nearby lymph nodes and has spread:
    to or beyond the middle tissue layers of the colon wall; or
    to nearby tissues around the colon or rectum; or
    to nearby organs and/or through the peritoneum.
  • kristasplace
    kristasplace Member Posts: 957 Member
    Options
    Stage IV
    I believe that any spread to another organ is considered metastasis, and therefore, stage IV. The stage IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc has to do with how many lymph nodes are involved. There is another staging to add to these if surrounding tissue is involved, or if the tumor has breached the peritoneal (sp?) wall. I think i am a stage IIIbT2MO because it was an enormous tumor, but did not breach the colon wall.

    I think that's how i remember it. I wonder when this chemo brain will wear off? I have NO memory! lol!

    Many hugs,
    Krista
  • joj56
    joj56 Member Posts: 13
    Options
    More info
    Thanks for the responses and support. Since I am new to all this please bear with me if I ask stupid questions.
    Is FulFOX the treatment and it includes drugs like Oxal, and Avastin, or are those drugs separate from the FulFox treatment.
    Sounds like people do have different reactions to the chemo. 12 sessions just seemed to scare me. I am trying to get myself mentally and physically (if that is possible) prepared before I begin my treatment.
    I intend to visit here often. People here seem to be very caring and concerned.
    I pray there will be a cure for all cancer very soon.
    Thanks again, everyone for welcoming me to the group. I want to find out more information about the semi-colons.
    Peace
    Jeri
  • lfondots63
    lfondots63 Member Posts: 818 Member
    Options
    joj56 said:

    More info
    Thanks for the responses and support. Since I am new to all this please bear with me if I ask stupid questions.
    Is FulFOX the treatment and it includes drugs like Oxal, and Avastin, or are those drugs separate from the FulFox treatment.
    Sounds like people do have different reactions to the chemo. 12 sessions just seemed to scare me. I am trying to get myself mentally and physically (if that is possible) prepared before I begin my treatment.
    I intend to visit here often. People here seem to be very caring and concerned.
    I pray there will be a cure for all cancer very soon.
    Thanks again, everyone for welcoming me to the group. I want to find out more information about the semi-colons.
    Peace
    Jeri

    HUGS and no question is stupid!!!
    All questions are welcome here. Sorry to have you here but glad you found us. Folfox is the treatment and oxiplatin, Avastin and others is the chemo used for the treatment. I think the first session was the scariest but not bad since I found this site before hand and always had questions for my onc. Wrote them down before seeing him and made sure I left space for an answer since you never seem to remember exactly what they tell you after a visit. Take someone with you too. Two minds concentrating on what the doctor says is helpful. Make sure when you start treatments to talk about your symptoms. Even the ones you think are little. Don't be 'brave' and not take anti nausea pills or pain pills. Also, the doctors is there for YOU. Don't feel bad about calling him if you are sick and nothing is making it better. HUGS and come back here often. I even was glad to use the chat on the website. Even though it is people with all types of cancers and caregivers or family members, it was nice to talk to someone real time that knew what I was going through.

    Lisa F
  • msccolon
    msccolon Member Posts: 1,917 Member
    Options
    joj56 said:

    More info
    Thanks for the responses and support. Since I am new to all this please bear with me if I ask stupid questions.
    Is FulFOX the treatment and it includes drugs like Oxal, and Avastin, or are those drugs separate from the FulFox treatment.
    Sounds like people do have different reactions to the chemo. 12 sessions just seemed to scare me. I am trying to get myself mentally and physically (if that is possible) prepared before I begin my treatment.
    I intend to visit here often. People here seem to be very caring and concerned.
    I pray there will be a cure for all cancer very soon.
    Thanks again, everyone for welcoming me to the group. I want to find out more information about the semi-colons.
    Peace
    Jeri

    FOLFOX
    Jeri, as Lisa said FOLFOX is 5FU-Leucovorin and Oxaliplatin (hence the acronym for the real names of the drugs) FOLFIRI is the 5FU, Leucovorin and Irinitocan (CPT-11). You will see once you get going in this the terms will, unfortunately, become common and you will understand what everyone is talking about. In fact, I went back to my profile that i had filled in back when I was first diagnosed and changed it quite a bit since initially I put in stuff that wound up being SOP for us semi-colons! And as far as the number of treatments being scary, just look at them one at a time; it's easier to handle that way. In fact, when my doc wants to begin me on chemo again he says "we'll do a few treatments and see how you do" knowing FULL well he is intending the full 12 treatments! God be with you, Jeri and let us know how it goes! Mary
  • Russell05
    Russell05 Member Posts: 60
    Options
    Liver mets.
    Hello Jeri.

    I am Russell, and what they have said so far is true. Been there done, that as they say. I had a liver resection in april of this yesr. I am doing fine now but I still have good day's and bad. Yet the pain is much less intense. All I can tell you is keep a check on your CEA's. Thoes numbers will let you know if it has spead.... although it took sevsral test for it to show up with me, They did find It, it had matted to my liver at 8cm. Had to be done by the transplant team at MCV Liver transplant team.
    What I should suggest to you is that you listen to your body.
    If you need further info you may call me at (804) 541-1540
    lol if I am not out fishing I will answer and give you all the info I can. I will keep you in prayer as others have done here for me.

    Russell Jefferson
  • mk1117
    mk1117 Member Posts: 46
    Options
    Hello Jeri
    Jeri,

    I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer at age 44, with 13 or 14 (chemo brain has affected my memory as well) positive nodes out of 17. I went through surgery and 12 treatments of chemotherapy over 6 months. Everyone's experience is different, but I found in my case that having a port-a-cath put in before I started chemo was very helpful. Also, I always went to my chemo treatments with a friend (instead of my husband). It was just was too difficult for both of us to be there together. With a friend, we could chat about other things, which made it more bearable. The biggest side effects I had were the adverse reaction to cold, hand cramps and the neuropathy in my feet and legs. My hair did get really thin, but I just cut it short. It has been almost 4 years since my diagnosis, and everything is going well. The neuropathy has just about disappeared, the hand cramps are gone, my hair has grown back in thicker than it was before. I still have to deal with a lot of fatigue - but I'll take feeling tired - I'm just happy to be here! All of my follow-ups have been clear. I agree with everyone else - don't focus on the statistics - they are scary to read, especially when you have as many positive lymph nodes as we did. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Hang in there, have faith, and take care of yourself.

    Kathy
  • joj56
    joj56 Member Posts: 13
    Options
    WOW!
    Thanks everyone!! You are all simply the best.
    At my first visit with the onc, he talked to me about having a 30% survivial rate of maybe 2-4 years or longer. I guess I should be glad he did add the word longer. My surgeon recommended this onc and said he is the best. I think he is just lacking somehwat in how to be encouraging. Also on my first visit he talked about sometimes people are on chemo the rest of their life.
    I am just not understanding everything, probably still in shock. Sounds like all of you, have very encouraging hopeful onc's.
    When you guys talk about treatments, do they vary- some people seem to have maybe 6 others have 12. Was wondering if after a few treatments they will do tests to see if we are getting the results we hope for (killing the cancer). Guess I am hoping to go thru a few treatments and be able to not need all twelve. I know that sounds stupid.
    Anyway, I really admire everyone here, and hope to be gain some knowledge and courage so I can be encouraging to others.
    Thanks again everyone
    Peace
    Jeri
  • joj56
    joj56 Member Posts: 13
    Options
    Russell05 said:

    Liver mets.
    Hello Jeri.

    I am Russell, and what they have said so far is true. Been there done, that as they say. I had a liver resection in april of this yesr. I am doing fine now but I still have good day's and bad. Yet the pain is much less intense. All I can tell you is keep a check on your CEA's. Thoes numbers will let you know if it has spead.... although it took sevsral test for it to show up with me, They did find It, it had matted to my liver at 8cm. Had to be done by the transplant team at MCV Liver transplant team.
    What I should suggest to you is that you listen to your body.
    If you need further info you may call me at (804) 541-1540
    lol if I am not out fishing I will answer and give you all the info I can. I will keep you in prayer as others have done here for me.

    Russell Jefferson

    CEA's
    Thanks Russell for the words of wisdom. When you mentioned checking the CEA's it reminded me that my CEA level prior to my surgery showed 2.4 which is in the normal range. I had surgery expecting I had ovarian cancer because my CA-125 marker was elevetated (that's what my drs. thought), and surprise I found out I had colon cancer. I was confused how the CEA marker could show in the normal range and here I have colon cancer.
    Still I am sure you do have to keep tabs on all lab work, and I will get more informed about stuff.
    I wish you the best in your treatment and recovery, so you can get back to fishing.
    Peace
    Jeri
    P.S.
    I am computer illiterate so if I post stuff the wrong way, please excuse me.
  • joj56
    joj56 Member Posts: 13
    Options
    mk1117 said:

    Hello Jeri
    Jeri,

    I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer at age 44, with 13 or 14 (chemo brain has affected my memory as well) positive nodes out of 17. I went through surgery and 12 treatments of chemotherapy over 6 months. Everyone's experience is different, but I found in my case that having a port-a-cath put in before I started chemo was very helpful. Also, I always went to my chemo treatments with a friend (instead of my husband). It was just was too difficult for both of us to be there together. With a friend, we could chat about other things, which made it more bearable. The biggest side effects I had were the adverse reaction to cold, hand cramps and the neuropathy in my feet and legs. My hair did get really thin, but I just cut it short. It has been almost 4 years since my diagnosis, and everything is going well. The neuropathy has just about disappeared, the hand cramps are gone, my hair has grown back in thicker than it was before. I still have to deal with a lot of fatigue - but I'll take feeling tired - I'm just happy to be here! All of my follow-ups have been clear. I agree with everyone else - don't focus on the statistics - they are scary to read, especially when you have as many positive lymph nodes as we did. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Hang in there, have faith, and take care of yourself.

    Kathy

    Hi Kathy
    Thanks for the information. I am printing out your message, because it does inspire me. I thought I was the only one to have 13 positive lymph nodes.
    I am glad to hear you are doing so well.
    How often do you have dr. visits now? Do you know after a period of NED do the doctors consider you cured?
    How did you handle the neuropathy?
    Did you ever get depressed before your 12 treatments were up?
    Don't mean to be nosey, just wanting to know more about your experience. I take it you only had to do one series of treatments?
    Thanks again for sharing Kathy. Great picture too!
    Peace
    Jeri
  • pamness
    pamness Member Posts: 524 Member
    Options
    mk1117 said:

    Hello Jeri
    Jeri,

    I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer at age 44, with 13 or 14 (chemo brain has affected my memory as well) positive nodes out of 17. I went through surgery and 12 treatments of chemotherapy over 6 months. Everyone's experience is different, but I found in my case that having a port-a-cath put in before I started chemo was very helpful. Also, I always went to my chemo treatments with a friend (instead of my husband). It was just was too difficult for both of us to be there together. With a friend, we could chat about other things, which made it more bearable. The biggest side effects I had were the adverse reaction to cold, hand cramps and the neuropathy in my feet and legs. My hair did get really thin, but I just cut it short. It has been almost 4 years since my diagnosis, and everything is going well. The neuropathy has just about disappeared, the hand cramps are gone, my hair has grown back in thicker than it was before. I still have to deal with a lot of fatigue - but I'll take feeling tired - I'm just happy to be here! All of my follow-ups have been clear. I agree with everyone else - don't focus on the statistics - they are scary to read, especially when you have as many positive lymph nodes as we did. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Hang in there, have faith, and take care of yourself.

    Kathy

    Hi Jerry don't know that I have seen you here before
    But I was diagnosed IIIA (2 positive nodes out of 20 some odd) did surgery, folfox - 8 rounds (only 5 with the oxaliplatin) with rest with 5FU and leukovorin and 28 days of radiation and 5FU. I am so glad to see that someone else still feels tired. I finished treat almost exactly a year ago. I am not exhausted any more, but some days, I am just tired. Not exhausted like before, but just tired. I had neuropathy but it is gone except on really cold days, but avoided cramps. Glad your hair grew back thicker than before, a small bonus!

    Congrats on the 4 years.

    Pam
  • pamness
    pamness Member Posts: 524 Member
    Options
    joj56 said:

    WOW!
    Thanks everyone!! You are all simply the best.
    At my first visit with the onc, he talked to me about having a 30% survivial rate of maybe 2-4 years or longer. I guess I should be glad he did add the word longer. My surgeon recommended this onc and said he is the best. I think he is just lacking somehwat in how to be encouraging. Also on my first visit he talked about sometimes people are on chemo the rest of their life.
    I am just not understanding everything, probably still in shock. Sounds like all of you, have very encouraging hopeful onc's.
    When you guys talk about treatments, do they vary- some people seem to have maybe 6 others have 12. Was wondering if after a few treatments they will do tests to see if we are getting the results we hope for (killing the cancer). Guess I am hoping to go thru a few treatments and be able to not need all twelve. I know that sounds stupid.
    Anyway, I really admire everyone here, and hope to be gain some knowledge and courage so I can be encouraging to others.
    Thanks again everyone
    Peace
    Jeri

    Cancer etc.
    Since you had a large number of positive nodes 12 rounds of folfox sounds pretty normal. They will do blood work everytime you go in to make sure you can handle the chemo (they will discontinue or postpone, or lower your dose) if they need too. A CT scan in generally done a month or so after the end of treatment. Don't focus on the number of treatments - it is doable - take the meds they recommend and ask for more if your side effects are not controlled. I had trouble with nausea and took emend for 3 days along with a steroid - and zolfran, compazine and attivan as back up. I don't know why your oncologist said what he did. You might want to look for someone more positive.

    Where are you going for treatment. You probably want to get yourself to a major medical center with a big cancer center if you are not currently there. If my oncologist had talked to me like yours did. I would be out of there. There isn't much substitute for major medical centers as they deal with so many cases and have statistics and opinions that are very well formed. All that said, your oncologist just might not be very good.

    Hoping for a few treatments - and not going as long as is recommended is not very realistic or in your best interest. Find an oncologist you trust and do your best. Chemo isn't that bad (I fell into the unfortunate group of people who tolerate it very poorly) but most do OK. Even from my point of view, I did everything I could no hesitation. I am currently ned.

    Pam
  • doris2657
    doris2657 Member Posts: 38
    Options
    hi jeri
    I have a pet scan every 2 month,blood test eevery 2 weeks,neuprogen shot 2 times a week,my onc told me already since I had mets to ovaries and almost 18 lymphnodes possitive I will be on maitenance chemo for the rest of my life,the only thing different will be I go every 3 weeks instead of every 2 weeks and they will not use the oxiliplatin,as far as your oncologist is concerned MD Anderson cancer hospital is 30 miles down the road from me,and everyone wanted me to go there,I chose to go to the oncologist I'm with now because I got good response about him plus he spend 5 yrs at MD Anderson,he is kind, compassionate, and he truly cares about his patients,my family love him.and since both myself and my grandfather had colon cancer he told me to test for the lynch gene because of my kids,I do not cary the lynch gene.Thank God.Jeri you will do great with your treatment if any problems a good onc will work with you a bad one you need to leave.God Bless you

    Doris
  • joj56
    joj56 Member Posts: 13
    Options
    doris2657 said:

    hi jeri
    I have a pet scan every 2 month,blood test eevery 2 weeks,neuprogen shot 2 times a week,my onc told me already since I had mets to ovaries and almost 18 lymphnodes possitive I will be on maitenance chemo for the rest of my life,the only thing different will be I go every 3 weeks instead of every 2 weeks and they will not use the oxiliplatin,as far as your oncologist is concerned MD Anderson cancer hospital is 30 miles down the road from me,and everyone wanted me to go there,I chose to go to the oncologist I'm with now because I got good response about him plus he spend 5 yrs at MD Anderson,he is kind, compassionate, and he truly cares about his patients,my family love him.and since both myself and my grandfather had colon cancer he told me to test for the lynch gene because of my kids,I do not cary the lynch gene.Thank God.Jeri you will do great with your treatment if any problems a good onc will work with you a bad one you need to leave.God Bless you

    Doris

    Thanks Doris
    I would really like to know more about your experience Doris, if you don't mind sharing.
    I hope it is o.k. to give you my home e-mail (I am new to this discussion board thing, not sure of any rules). jeri.jones@sbcglobal.net.
    Hope to hear from you.
    Take care and God bless you!
    Peace
    Jeri
  • mk1117
    mk1117 Member Posts: 46
    Options
    joj56 said:

    Hi Kathy
    Thanks for the information. I am printing out your message, because it does inspire me. I thought I was the only one to have 13 positive lymph nodes.
    I am glad to hear you are doing so well.
    How often do you have dr. visits now? Do you know after a period of NED do the doctors consider you cured?
    How did you handle the neuropathy?
    Did you ever get depressed before your 12 treatments were up?
    Don't mean to be nosey, just wanting to know more about your experience. I take it you only had to do one series of treatments?
    Thanks again for sharing Kathy. Great picture too!
    Peace
    Jeri

    Answers to your questions, Jeri
    Jeri -

    I had six months of chemotherapy (the latest FOLFOX that was available at that time). I had 12 treatments, one every other week. Only my last treatment had to be delayed by one week because my white blood cell counts were too high.

    Once I reached the 2 year mark (since diagnosis), I see my oncologist every 6 months. I'm now at the point where I don't have to get CT scans at my checkups anymore, just bloodwork. I didn't even have to have a colonscopy last year.

    The neuropathy was tough. I never took any medication for it, though. (I don't even know if there is any medication to help with that.) The best gift I received when I was going through chemo was an electric blanket from my husband. Because it was winter when I was going through chemo, I stayed inside alot.

    It probably has taken about 3 years for the neuropathy to subside, although it will never be completely gone. The adverse reaction to cold from the chemo was probably one of the worst side effects. I drank a lot of Propel water that I stored outside the fridge so it was room temperature. I either used gloves at the grocery store to pick up cold items, or my daughters took care of the cold items. It is such a joy to be able to eat ice cream now!

    You hear alot about losing weight during chemo, but I gained weight, and it seems that isn't that unusual. Unfortunately, I can't seem to lose the weight (maybe it's the ice cream!)

    Looking back, I don't think I was too depressed during treatments. I found that doing other things to take my mind off the cancer helped. I was in the midst of getting my master's in teaching when I was diagnosed, so I continued to take classes (primarily online), which helped so much.

    To be considered "cancer-free", you have to reach the five year point from your date of diagnosis, but again, my oncologist said that going 2 years without a recurrence is significant with a colon cancer diagnosis. My email address is mk1117@aol.com if you ever want to email me with any specific questions or encouragement.

    Take care and hang in there!

    Kathy

    My doctors prescribed prozac right after my diagnosis, which I still take daily. I also took anti-anxiety medication (still do as necessary), especially before every treatment.
  • mk1117
    mk1117 Member Posts: 46
    Options
    pamness said:

    Hi Jerry don't know that I have seen you here before
    But I was diagnosed IIIA (2 positive nodes out of 20 some odd) did surgery, folfox - 8 rounds (only 5 with the oxaliplatin) with rest with 5FU and leukovorin and 28 days of radiation and 5FU. I am so glad to see that someone else still feels tired. I finished treat almost exactly a year ago. I am not exhausted any more, but some days, I am just tired. Not exhausted like before, but just tired. I had neuropathy but it is gone except on really cold days, but avoided cramps. Glad your hair grew back thicker than before, a small bonus!

    Congrats on the 4 years.

    Pam

    Comment to Pam
    Pam -

    I agree with you completely on being tired. It's not at all like it was before I was diagnosed, but it's like I feel tired from the inside out, if that makes any sense. I went back to work, but found it was too tiring to work full-time. Luckily I found a part-time job that gives me some flexibility. Sometimes on my day off, I stay on the couch most of the day. I've learned that when I get tired, I just need to really rest, otherwise I feel run down for days.

    Glad to hear you're doing well, too.

    Kathy
  • Kanort
    Kanort Member Posts: 1,272 Member
    Options
    Welcome!
    Hi Jeri,

    I am glad you have found our group and that you have gotten such great information from fellow survivors. You became a survivor the day you were diagnosed so wear that hat proudly!!! I was diagnosed stage 3 in October of 2003 and have remained cancer free since completing my chemo in July of 2004. I was one of the first patients in my area to receive Folfox and was able to complete all 12 cycles without too many problems. On my first treatment, the nurses forgot to give me any anti-nausea meds, and I ended up in the hospital with a bowel obstuction as a result. So, be sure and asked for the meds and you will be fine.

    You sound like you have a great attitude and that will serve you well in your battle. I wore bright colors to chemo and always had on seasonal or funny socks. They served as an icebreaker to those around me getting infused. Since I always went to my treatments alone, I spent a lot of time making new friends with those in infusions chairs next to me.

    Come here often, Jeri, for support and information. We will be with you on your journey to complete healing.

    Hugs,

    Kay