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Dietary Approaches to Fighting Cancer

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  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816
    For Carolen her liver and those favorably interested-
    About a liver. I have had trouble with mine and on doing research found some studies that used melatonin to help repair liver issues. I believe I googled NASH and melatonin to find the study. Oddly, the combo came to me and was the first thing I thought of in the middle of the night one night when I went to bed wondering what the heck i was going to do make my stupid liver get better.

    So, here's the article. I have been trying just 6mg at night. I am unable to get the full text which would most likely give greater info and times of dosing. I assume it's at night so as to reset the pineal gland but don't know. Plan on upping the dose overtime. I take one an hour before going to bed and then one at bedtime. I have noticed that I am sleeping through the night now, whereas before I would sleep for from one and half to four hours and then I'd be up.

    Still think getting together to talk out all the possibilities would be a great idea.

    I think as lay people we tend to think that all the thoughts have already been examined. I am learning they haven't. Not at all.

    I had always assumed, and made mention of here on more than one occasion, that the thought of giving chemo in a manner similar to antibiotics made more sense than slamming a person til near demise and then allowing them to recover. As I was finishing that book Dr. Foldman's War just now, they began to consider that possibility and found out that the basis for that protocol (nearly kill than allow to recover)was just a report based on the results with I think sixteen rabbits, forty years ago. Forty years ago. And no one bothered to question its validity. YIKES! I could look up the specifics on the test, but I would really rather you read the book. There is talk of the validity of thalidomide's role in anti angiogenesis and interferon's use in curing, that is right curing giant-cell sarcoma's.
    Any how, here's that study::


    The pilot study of 3-month course of melatonin treatment of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: effect on plasma levels of liver enzymes, lipids and melatonin.
    Gonciarz M, Gonciarz Z, Bielanski W, Mularczyk A, Konturek PC, Brzozowski T, Konturek SJ.
    SourceDepartment of Gastroenterology, St Barbara's Main District Hospital, Sosnowiec, Poland.

    Abstract
    The mechanism by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses into nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unknown, however, the major process is oxidative stress with increased production of reactive oxygen species and excessive inflammatory cytokine generation. To date, there are no effective treatments for NASH and the published data with treatment using antioxidants are not satisfactory. Melatonin (MT), the potent endogenous antioxidant secreted in circadian rhythm by pinealocytes and in large amounts in the digestive system, was reported to improve oxidative status and to exert beneficial effects in NASH pathology in experimental animals, but no study attempted to determine the possible effectiveness of MT in humans with NASH. In this study, 42 patients (12 placebo controls and 30 MT-treated) with histological evidence (liver biopsy) of NASH and no history of alcohol abuse, were included. The treatment group took melatonin (2x5 mg/daily orally), while controls were treated with placebo. At baseline no significant differences between the groups were found for age, body mass index (BMI) as well as for plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), glucose and MT. During the study period plasma ALT level and cholesterol concentration decreased significantly in both MT-treated and control groups, however AST and GGT levels decreased significantly only in MT-treated groups. Median value of AST level at baseline was 76.5 (64.2-114.2) IU/L and its percentage decrease at 4, 8 and 12 week was 20, 36 and 38%, resp. Baseline GGT median level was 113 (75.7-210.7) IU/L and its mean percentage decrease at week 4, 8 and 12 was 46, 48 and 47%, resp. Plasma ALP levels did not change significantly during MT treatment. Median value of plasma concentrations of MT (pg/mL) in MT-treated group rose from 7.5 (5.0-14.25) at baseline to 35.5(18.8-110.0), 43.5(17.0-102.5) and 49.5(18.0-99.5) at the end of 4, 8 and 12 week of treatment, respectively. Plasma levels of TG and glucose as well as BMI in controls and MT-treated patients were not significantly different from baseline. This study demonstrates for the first time in humans that three months treatment with MT significantly improves plasma liver enzymes in patients with NASH without causing any side-effect. Plasma MT levels during the whole period of MT treatment persisted above that at baseline. Our findings show that treatment with MT significantly improves plasma liver enzymes in NASH patients, but larger cohort trials and longer treatment with MT are required before this indole could be included into the spectrum of the NASH treatment.

    PMID: 21224501 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text


    One other thing I thought I'd mention to you, Carolen, is that I have symptoms almost always related to either stress or almonds. True there were a lot of almonds consumed and I know that almonds are usually good for a liver, but apparently not mine. and certainly not with chocolate. My liver is currently much, much less tender than previously.
  • carolenk
    carolenk Member Posts: 907

    For Carolen her liver and those favorably interested-
    About a liver. I have had trouble with mine and on doing research found some studies that used melatonin to help repair liver issues. I believe I googled NASH and melatonin to find the study. Oddly, the combo came to me and was the first thing I thought of in the middle of the night one night when I went to bed wondering what the heck i was going to do make my stupid liver get better.

    So, here's the article. I have been trying just 6mg at night. I am unable to get the full text which would most likely give greater info and times of dosing. I assume it's at night so as to reset the pineal gland but don't know. Plan on upping the dose overtime. I take one an hour before going to bed and then one at bedtime. I have noticed that I am sleeping through the night now, whereas before I would sleep for from one and half to four hours and then I'd be up.

    Still think getting together to talk out all the possibilities would be a great idea.

    I think as lay people we tend to think that all the thoughts have already been examined. I am learning they haven't. Not at all.

    I had always assumed, and made mention of here on more than one occasion, that the thought of giving chemo in a manner similar to antibiotics made more sense than slamming a person til near demise and then allowing them to recover. As I was finishing that book Dr. Foldman's War just now, they began to consider that possibility and found out that the basis for that protocol (nearly kill than allow to recover)was just a report based on the results with I think sixteen rabbits, forty years ago. Forty years ago. And no one bothered to question its validity. YIKES! I could look up the specifics on the test, but I would really rather you read the book. There is talk of the validity of thalidomide's role in anti angiogenesis and interferon's use in curing, that is right curing giant-cell sarcoma's.
    Any how, here's that study::


    The pilot study of 3-month course of melatonin treatment of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: effect on plasma levels of liver enzymes, lipids and melatonin.
    Gonciarz M, Gonciarz Z, Bielanski W, Mularczyk A, Konturek PC, Brzozowski T, Konturek SJ.
    SourceDepartment of Gastroenterology, St Barbara's Main District Hospital, Sosnowiec, Poland.

    Abstract
    The mechanism by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses into nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unknown, however, the major process is oxidative stress with increased production of reactive oxygen species and excessive inflammatory cytokine generation. To date, there are no effective treatments for NASH and the published data with treatment using antioxidants are not satisfactory. Melatonin (MT), the potent endogenous antioxidant secreted in circadian rhythm by pinealocytes and in large amounts in the digestive system, was reported to improve oxidative status and to exert beneficial effects in NASH pathology in experimental animals, but no study attempted to determine the possible effectiveness of MT in humans with NASH. In this study, 42 patients (12 placebo controls and 30 MT-treated) with histological evidence (liver biopsy) of NASH and no history of alcohol abuse, were included. The treatment group took melatonin (2x5 mg/daily orally), while controls were treated with placebo. At baseline no significant differences between the groups were found for age, body mass index (BMI) as well as for plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), glucose and MT. During the study period plasma ALT level and cholesterol concentration decreased significantly in both MT-treated and control groups, however AST and GGT levels decreased significantly only in MT-treated groups. Median value of AST level at baseline was 76.5 (64.2-114.2) IU/L and its percentage decrease at 4, 8 and 12 week was 20, 36 and 38%, resp. Baseline GGT median level was 113 (75.7-210.7) IU/L and its mean percentage decrease at week 4, 8 and 12 was 46, 48 and 47%, resp. Plasma ALP levels did not change significantly during MT treatment. Median value of plasma concentrations of MT (pg/mL) in MT-treated group rose from 7.5 (5.0-14.25) at baseline to 35.5(18.8-110.0), 43.5(17.0-102.5) and 49.5(18.0-99.5) at the end of 4, 8 and 12 week of treatment, respectively. Plasma levels of TG and glucose as well as BMI in controls and MT-treated patients were not significantly different from baseline. This study demonstrates for the first time in humans that three months treatment with MT significantly improves plasma liver enzymes in patients with NASH without causing any side-effect. Plasma MT levels during the whole period of MT treatment persisted above that at baseline. Our findings show that treatment with MT significantly improves plasma liver enzymes in NASH patients, but larger cohort trials and longer treatment with MT are required before this indole could be included into the spectrum of the NASH treatment.

    PMID: 21224501 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text


    One other thing I thought I'd mention to you, Carolen, is that I have symptoms almost always related to either stress or almonds. True there were a lot of almonds consumed and I know that almonds are usually good for a liver, but apparently not mine. and certainly not with chocolate. My liver is currently much, much less tender than previously.

    Thanks for sharing that
    Thanks for sharing that information. NASH is also known as "fatty liver" so named because the liver degenerates and liver cells are replaced by fat cells. A fatty liver is usually associated with a high-carb diet. And I have seen fatty livers reverse to normal when they are found and treated before they progress to NASH. There are several good herbs for the liver--milk thistle is probably one of the ones best known.

    The dose of melatonin that Tethys takes is 20 mg at bedtime--so the hormone seems to be quite safe in high doses.

    I was reading about laetrile (B17)and learned that there was a time when a person in the US could get the "nutrient" from eating raw almonds. However, out of some fear the government had of B17, all almonds are treated somehow (I can't find the source of this information) so that the B17 is destroyed in it. Even raw, organic almonds. In any case, Claudia, you should stay away from almonds and probably chocolate, too.
  • Tethys41
    Tethys41 Member Posts: 1,373 **
    carolenk said:

    Thanks for sharing that
    Thanks for sharing that information. NASH is also known as "fatty liver" so named because the liver degenerates and liver cells are replaced by fat cells. A fatty liver is usually associated with a high-carb diet. And I have seen fatty livers reverse to normal when they are found and treated before they progress to NASH. There are several good herbs for the liver--milk thistle is probably one of the ones best known.

    The dose of melatonin that Tethys takes is 20 mg at bedtime--so the hormone seems to be quite safe in high doses.

    I was reading about laetrile (B17)and learned that there was a time when a person in the US could get the "nutrient" from eating raw almonds. However, out of some fear the government had of B17, all almonds are treated somehow (I can't find the source of this information) so that the B17 is destroyed in it. Even raw, organic almonds. In any case, Claudia, you should stay away from almonds and probably chocolate, too.

    B17
    Carolen,
    I know of the source to which you are referring regarding the removal of B17 from ALL almonds in the US. I read it too. Can you still get it in bitter apricot seeds?

    How does one treat a fatty liver? Do you use only the herbs you list above?
  • Rewriter
    Rewriter Member Posts: 493
    Tethys41 said:

    B17
    Carolen,
    I know of the source to which you are referring regarding the removal of B17 from ALL almonds in the US. I read it too. Can you still get it in bitter apricot seeds?

    How does one treat a fatty liver? Do you use only the herbs you list above?

    Anti-angiogenesis food list
    I will stop in here every once in a while to update this food thread. My focus right now is on reviving my career, but I think about all of you so often. To those of you who have written to me on this board, I deeply appreciate your comments. To those who have contacted me privately, I will be in touch soon. Much love to all.

    Jill

    Claudia provides a very good explanation of angiogenesis is a separate thread. I have excerpted the information on foods that inhibit angiogenesis:

    If you're new here, angiogenesis is the process of cancer cells sending out signals to bring new blood vessels to them. Without these new blood vessels, these little outposts cannot grow and have no power to harm, due to their limited nutrient getting capabilities and the resulting limited size capabilities.

    This is a list of foods, that act to discourage angiogenesis from the society by the same name:

    GREEN TEA
    STRAWBERRIES
    BLACKBERRIES
    RASPBERRIES
    BULEBERRIES
    ORANGES
    GRAPEFrUIT
    LEMONS
    APPLES
    PINEAPPLE
    CHERRIES
    RED WINE
    RED GRAPES
    BOK CHOY
    KALE
    SOY BEANS
    GINSENG
    Maitake mushroom
    Licorice
    Turmeric
    nutmeg
    Artichokes
    LAVENDER
    PUMPKIN
    SEA CUCUMBER
    TUNA
    PARSLEY
    GARLIC
    TOMATO
    OLIVE OIL
    GRAPE SEED OIL
    DARK CHOCOLATE

    Whatever you do, there are people to answer your questions. Most are simple questions, I am rather on the outskirts looking in and all around in the search for answers.
  • Rewriter
    Rewriter Member Posts: 493
    Rewriter said:

    Anti-angiogenesis food list
    I will stop in here every once in a while to update this food thread. My focus right now is on reviving my career, but I think about all of you so often. To those of you who have written to me on this board, I deeply appreciate your comments. To those who have contacted me privately, I will be in touch soon. Much love to all.

    Jill

    Claudia provides a very good explanation of angiogenesis is a separate thread. I have excerpted the information on foods that inhibit angiogenesis:

    If you're new here, angiogenesis is the process of cancer cells sending out signals to bring new blood vessels to them. Without these new blood vessels, these little outposts cannot grow and have no power to harm, due to their limited nutrient getting capabilities and the resulting limited size capabilities.

    This is a list of foods, that act to discourage angiogenesis from the society by the same name:

    GREEN TEA
    STRAWBERRIES
    BLACKBERRIES
    RASPBERRIES
    BULEBERRIES
    ORANGES
    GRAPEFrUIT
    LEMONS
    APPLES
    PINEAPPLE
    CHERRIES
    RED WINE
    RED GRAPES
    BOK CHOY
    KALE
    SOY BEANS
    GINSENG
    Maitake mushroom
    Licorice
    Turmeric
    nutmeg
    Artichokes
    LAVENDER
    PUMPKIN
    SEA CUCUMBER
    TUNA
    PARSLEY
    GARLIC
    TOMATO
    OLIVE OIL
    GRAPE SEED OIL
    DARK CHOCOLATE

    Whatever you do, there are people to answer your questions. Most are simple questions, I am rather on the outskirts looking in and all around in the search for answers.

    Yogurt
    I have edited the following posts, which I hope Linda will not mind, so as to include only the pertinent information about the food in question. All of the other great information can be read in the original thread.


    From Linda Procopio, in response to Fayard's need to gain weight and question about adding some yogurt to her diet.

    I eat Greek yogurt daily, on advice from my nutritionist.

    As your cancer journey continues, what you need for your health changes too.

    Most of the rarer and more aggressive cancers tend to NOT be hormone receptive, although you really need a simple assay to know for sure how that is for you personally. If your particular cancer is ER-, the benefits of adding some dairy or meat to your body, at this juncture, may outweigh the risks. From my 1st appointment with a cancer nutritionist in 2008, I was told to eat at least a tablespoon of active yogurt every single day to help restore the good bacteria that chemo could be killing off.
  • Rewriter
    Rewriter Member Posts: 493
    Rewriter said:

    Yogurt
    I have edited the following posts, which I hope Linda will not mind, so as to include only the pertinent information about the food in question. All of the other great information can be read in the original thread.


    From Linda Procopio, in response to Fayard's need to gain weight and question about adding some yogurt to her diet.

    I eat Greek yogurt daily, on advice from my nutritionist.

    As your cancer journey continues, what you need for your health changes too.

    Most of the rarer and more aggressive cancers tend to NOT be hormone receptive, although you really need a simple assay to know for sure how that is for you personally. If your particular cancer is ER-, the benefits of adding some dairy or meat to your body, at this juncture, may outweigh the risks. From my 1st appointment with a cancer nutritionist in 2008, I was told to eat at least a tablespoon of active yogurt every single day to help restore the good bacteria that chemo could be killing off.

    Video on anti-cancer diet posted by a former board member
    This was posted a while ago, but it is a good introduction to the diet. Also, I would suggest using the search option to find more information on the anti-cancer diet. Good luck!
    I'm not sure who posted this originally, but it is pertinent to this thread:


    Incredible lecture given by Servan-Schreiber at UCSF. Discusses the studies and perspectives of why oncologists say what they say, dismissively, about diet and exercise. His arguments backed by science. A must-see!

    Natural Defenses in Preventing and Treating Cancer - UCtelevision


    (28:20 in) “…For the last 40 years, all of oncology has been focused on destroying cancer cells….We spent between 150 and 200 billion dollars on cancer research in the last 40 years and we’ve improved the median survival of metastatic cancer, which is really the only one that kills you, by 3 months….So maybe we’re not pursuing quite the right roadmap. And what [I and others are] saying…is that yes it’s great to kill cancer cells but obviously it doesn’t seem to be enough. It is important, at the same time, to strengthen the body’s ability to resist cancer by creating an inhospitable terrain to cancer growth. And you can do both at the same time. This is not about alternative medicine.”
  • carolenk
    carolenk Member Posts: 907
    Tethys41 said:

    B17
    Carolen,
    I know of the source to which you are referring regarding the removal of B17 from ALL almonds in the US. I read it too. Can you still get it in bitter apricot seeds?

    How does one treat a fatty liver? Do you use only the herbs you list above?

    I don't know about B17 in
    I don't know about B17 in bitter almonds. Choline deficiency can cause fatty liver. Organic egg yolks are a good source of choline or choline can be taken as a supplement with meals. People with fatty liver should follow the anti-candida diet (no sugar or simple carbs).
  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816
    RoseyR said:

    Ginger, Beta Carotene, and Anti-Fungals
    Thanks, Jill, for starting to gather all the pertinent information on foods' anti-cancer properties. A huge job, but invaluable to us!

    Having read through the responses to her first posting on ginger, would like to add the following:

    I'm a firm believer in the efficacy of ginger. Years ago, a very annoying tremor in my leg--which didn't respond within a month to the anti-inflammatories prescribed by my doctor--was squelched after I did some research and consumed 2 capsules of ginger (Nature's Way) every few hours. In just a few days, the tremor that had dogged me all summer disappeared. Coincidence? I don't think so.
    Ginger has a powerful anti-inflammatory with a long medical history in Eastern cultures. And few side effects.

    But thanks, Jill, for reminding us that when platelets are really low, we should avoid ginger--as well as ALL blood-thinning foods and supplements, such as the following:
    a lot of green tea, our beloved berries, garlic, fish oil and vitamin E. These are all BENEFICIAL under normal circumstances but not when platelets are very low. And one of the reasons they are beneficial--not the only reason--is their blood-thininning properties. As cancer patients, we WANT thin blood (blood with relatively low platelet counts), for thick blood (platelet counts on the higher side of normal) tends to encourage metastasis, according to Dr. Keith Block, eminent in the field of integrative medicine.

    Likewise, according to Block, we want low levels of INFLAMMATION, measured by CRP levels in our blood tests. (C-Reactive Protein). Low levels correlate with reduced danger of cancer spread. Ginger--as well as garlic, curcumin, green tea, quercetin--all help to suppress inflammatory reactions.

    So in effect, if our platelets are not critically low, we WANT to ingest all of these substances.

    As for the warnings about beta-carotene: Several analyses of clinical studies explain that beta carotene was surmised, in a few studies, to CAUSE lung cancer because it was used a) by itself (rather than along with the other carotenes) and b) in artificial form. Several writers including Blaylock and Block clarify this point. Beta carotene is GOOD for us, but best when combined, synergistically, with lutein and other carotenes, preferably those derived from the algae dunsinella (sp?) if we are taking "mixed carotene" supplements.

    I was particularly struck by one of your comments that "anti-fungals" deserve their own thread. If one reads James Quillen's idiosyncratic book on nutrition and cancer (he has the credentials to be authoriative but tends to be quirky and anecdotal at times; footnoting is sometimes sporadic), he keeps speculating that many cancers may be little more than a FUNGUS. Repeated anecdotal evidence leads to his speculation as he cites several patients, told to "get their affairs in order," with, say, stage 3 lung cancer, who refused more chemo and asked for an antifungal medication--and who, ten years later, were NED. Granted, it's speculative, but many profound findings begin with speculation based on anedcotal evidence. Obvisoulsy they need confirmation through concerted study.

    But I think we should all pursue anything we can find on the possible connection between some cancers and fungi and list anti-fungal properties in foods and spices.
    Rosemary and thyme, I recall, are powerful antifungals--as is garlic.

    Sugar, in contrast, feeds fungal growth, and it was fascinating for me to read, in a book about Chinese medicine, that "uterine disorders" are associated with "too much dampness." Dampness = fungus, does it not?
    Eggplant, in the same text, was cited as a vegetable that, in ancient Chinese practice, was always prescribed for uterine disorders.

    Best,
    Rosey


    reply

    Rosey, rosemary too, is an antifungal.
    Rosey listed Rosemary as a antifungal .It's that and more. If you google Rosemary and cancer you will find quite a bit.Rosemary has a strong taste in tea. I use lots of Ginger along with green tea and it blocks/masks the taste of more bitter herbs like burdock and dandilion root etc.I has been shown to Block/ help metabolize estrogens in the body.Unfortunately, those who are on blood thining medication or some pain relievers cannot use all the natural blood thinning effects of the herbs I listed. Its Good for "preventing" thrombosis.Here is one artical I read which sums up most of what you will find.**********************************************************************************************Previously posted, got lost somewhere.

    Recent FindingsMany of the traditional uses of rosemary are supported by modern research. In addition to the essential oil eucalyptol (cineole), researchers have isolated a number ofpotentially therapeutic compounds, including tannins, flavonoids, caffeic acid derivatives such as rosmarinic acid, and diterpenes such as carnosol or carnosic acid. All of these may have potential therapeutic effects. In recent years, rosemary has developed a reputation for antibacterial and antifungal action, and herbalists recommend that the leaves be used externally for skin infections.CancerOf all the potential therapeutic effects of rosemary, the most exciting is its role in preventing cancer. Researchers have demonstrated that natural polyphenols found in rosemary have potent anticarcinogenic properties. To date, rosemary extract, or its active components, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, have been shown to prevent cancer by several actions.Antioxidant -- better than BHTResearch into the free-radical quenching effects of rosemary have found it to be a potent antioxidant, possessing greater activity than the common food additives BHT (tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene) and BHA (tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisol). (2) The discovery of the antioxidant activity of rosemary in biological systems supports the historical use of rosemary as a preservative for meats and foods.Estrogen BlockerResearchers have shown that rosemary enhances the metabolism and removal of endogenous estrogens and decreases their cancer-promoting actions. Researchers evaluated the effects of rosemary extract on the metabolism and action of estradiol and estrone given to female mice. The results of the study showed that feeding female mice a 2% rosemary diet increased liver microsomal oxidation and glucuronidation of estradiol and estrone and inhibited their uterotropic action. (3)Carcinogen BlockerResearchers have found that rosemary extract can prevent carcinogens from binding to and possibly mutating cellular DNA -- two early steps in initiating cancer. In onestudy, researchers compared the effects of whole rosemary extracts to its purified components, carnosol and ursolic acid, on the initiation of breast cancer in rats. They found that whole rosemary extract taken orally prevented the carcinogen 7, 12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) from binding to the rats breast cell DNA. Neither carnosol nor ursolic acid had any effect when taken orally. When injected, whole rosemary extract and carnosol (but not ursolic acid) decreased carcinogen binding to DNA and decreased tumor formation by 37 percent. Again, ursolic acid had little effect. (4)ConclusionRosemary clearly is an herb with many benefits. Valued for its contributions in the kitchen, and prized by modern herbalists for its traditional healing powers, rosemaryis now beginning to reveal its true life-enhancing powers to modern scientific research. Current findings show that rosemary is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, and that it prevents carcinogens from binding to DNA, and stimulates liver detoxification of carcinogens. Ongoing research will continue to elucidate the role of this herb in health, but we dont need to wait to begin to enjoy the life-enhancing benefits of this herb. the entire link is here.http://www.yourmenopausetype.com/menopausequestionsandanswers/04232000.html
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    carolenk said:

    I don't know about B17 in
    I don't know about B17 in bitter almonds. Choline deficiency can cause fatty liver. Organic egg yolks are a good source of choline or choline can be taken as a supplement with meals. People with fatty liver should follow the anti-candida diet (no sugar or simple carbs).

    SEVERAL THOUGHTS ON THESE RECENT POSTS

    Am back to work full time, so able to visit the boards less often.

    But am fascinated by some of these posts.

    Re fatty liver, Claudia, I know only that artichokes are supposed to be the vegetable par excellence for the liver, helping to thin bile and nourishing the organ. Even Ralph Moss's web site has an entire article about it.

    Re whether to take, or not take, supplements, I am of two minds.

    Yes, food is the BEST source of most nutrients because they occur there with phytochemicals that are synergistic. And some supplements are far purer than others; Standard Process Labs, for example, reputedly produces supplements that are not mere extracts, but substances that occur in their "whole" form. (I am impressed by the theories of Dr. Bruce West on this subject; in his newsletter "Health Alert" he claims that his mother wound up in a wheelchair from radiation to her pelvic region for uterine cancer; that this cancer soon spread to her lungs; but that she is still alive nine years later on the Mediterranean diet, Standard Process Lab supplements (including peptides that boost the performance of the thymus gland, crucial to the entire immune system).

    However, not only is much of our food supply degraded from depleted soil and other problems--so that unless we are really careful to eat primarily fresh organic foods, we are getting little sustenance-but the very digestive systems we have may well have been compromised by too much chemo and radiation, notorious for destroying the delicate tissues of the digestive tract so that, even a year or two after treatment, we do not ABSORB many nutrients.

    The latter fact is one argument, for me, that supports the use of supplements.

    Another is the fact--as reported by one of MD Anderson's key researchers, Aggarwal, that taxol is so toxic that it in itself creates an inflammatory state that causes micrometastases that show up, a few years later, and are diagnosed as evidence that our tumor has spread--rather than that taxol has HELPED it to spread. Curcumin is so suppressive of inflammation that he and other researchers recommend it be taken throughout chemotherapy to prevent this dynamic from occuring. And as Dr Jeanne Drisko (Kansas U) observes, patients who start chemo with high levels of antioxidants do better than those who are already low in antioxidants: which is why Dr. Russell Blaylock long advised HIS cancer patients to DELAY chemo and radiation for a few weeks to boster their immune systems with Vitamin E succinate, fish oil, and other supplements.

    On the subject of melatonin, Claudia and all: I have a lot of research on it that would be happy to forward. I pursued the research upon finding a few clinical studies reporting that women with UTERINE cancer, of all cancers, are at diagnosis, notoriously low in melatonin. Reading up on the subject, and with the endorsement of my integrative doctor, I took 20 mgs a night during radiation and my last three rounds of chemo. Although I rarely had had trouble sleeping, neither did I feel 'drugged" by melatonin, whose use was first sanctioned for cancer patients by the Italian researcher Lissoni (sp?) a few decades ago. (Ladies, I also hate to report that my very use of this computer at the moment may well be lowering my melatonin levels; exposure to artificial light after dark--particularly, from computer screens, fluorescent light, and so on--diminished melatonin production, as does stress, which is why meditation has recently been found to boost melatonin levels.
    Nurses who work the night shift, you may already know, suffer far higher rates of breast cancer than the female population at large--because exposure to sustained light at the very time our pineal gland should be secreting melatonin wreaks hormonal havoc. (Perhaps I'm too much the romantic, but it all makes sense: we were not MEANT to use sunscreen, which prevents Vitamin D absorption, just as we were MEANT to be asleep soon after dark--not staring into computer screens and watchig televison late into the night. (She said, while sitting in a WIFI cafe--hardly an ideal environment for a cancer patient. I saved forty dollars a month by getting rid of WIFI in my apartment because WIFI where we SLEEP is particularly hazardous. A good source on this subject is the recent book Zapped! by Ann Louise Gittleman.)

    Getting back to nutrition: I agree with Joann that we need to watch the interactions of supplements; it's true that some, such as ginger, garlic, curcumin, fish oil can have anti-clotting effects. However that effect is only dangerous if our platelets are really low (below 60), or we're about to undergo surgery, or we've already had "bleeding episodes" showing fragile platelets. One of you who is taking intravenous Vitamin C wondered why you are bruising so much: it could be the OTHER supplements you're taking, such as those I just mentioned.

    None of this is to pretend I know much about the entire elusive and underresearched field of cancer and nutrition. There will, my doctor shakes his head sadly, NEVER be adequate research in this field because the financial rewards are so few: no company will get rich on the discovery that Vitamin E succinate does enhance chemo or that fish oil does enhance our resistance to certain cancers. If he's right (and I hope he's not), we have to do the best we can to ferret out what we can.

    As I noted in an earlier post, I'm now very interested in the theory that some cancers, perhaps even many, are manifestations of a fungus. Grape-seed extract is a powerful anti-fungal; so are garlic and rosemary. Do we know of others? Can we compile a list?

    Best,
    Rosey
  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816
    Carolen
    Hello, I was wondering if you had a list, or a url or some further info on the companions to vitamins, Vit E and Selenium is a start. Thanks.
  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816
    Rewriter said:

    TURMERIC/CURCUMIN
    This article was first posted by Claudia and includes her commentary. It may seem that I am including on this thread a disproportionate number of Claudia's posts; but whenever I do a search for a particular anticancer food, Claudia is the person who has posted an article about it. Thank you, Claudia!

    Again, my intention here is to include ONE thread that provides easy references to the top anticancer foods. Further information can be found by searching the board's content.

    Beginning of Claudia's comments:

    I am pasting the study here, but first i wanted to say this. Turmeric is difficult for the body to absorb true, but when taken with simple black pepper (pipperine is a component of black pepper) it's absorption rate is increased 1000 fold, or there abouts, according to some of my research. i find it absolutely astonishing that the knowledable folks at MD Anderson didn't have this information on hand prior to starting the trial. Although they are most likely better spellers than am I.

    if you take the time to read the study, you will notice that is mentions a fat capsule thingy. also during my research, it was suggested that along with the simple black pepper, a bit of olive oil would work wonders. It also mentioned heating it gently together. Wonder how long it will be for them to figure all this out.

    you remember when those studies were published years ago that said a child didn't recognize it's mother for a few months. how many of you ever believed that.

    Some times it all just gives me a headache.

    As i am reading this, i realize that they are talking about patients with PANCREATIC CANCER, one of the deadliest and quickest to kill of the cancers. not only that but they are talking about living for 2.5 years, and having the tumor shrink by 73%. This is truly astounding. And something i had not been aware of either. All this without any chemo or radiation, which is only allowed if the patient is hopelessly mostly dead.

    imagine the results they would have had had they used the black pepper and the olive oil, as has been used for thousands of years. i think they need me over there. maybe i could at least send them the book.

    Wait, i especially like the part about seeking additional funding. let's see turmeric, costs about four dollars at the grocery store and you can get it way cheaper and organic on line.

    you notice my growing frustration???????????????????????????????????????????

    When it comes to medical care me thinks we need to step back in time a bit and let the chemical companies find some other uses for their chemicals. (sorry, it just slipped out, i try to contain myself, but alas, to no avail)

    hey, if nothing else happens it seems to prevent wrinkles, i have noticed my skin looking fabby pooh of late. ; ~ )

    I'm just sayin'

    love and kisses claudia

    The results:

    Curcumin Temporarily Slows Pancreatic Cancer

    CancerWise - September 2008

    By Darcy De Leon

    Curcumin, a compound in the spice turmeric, temporarily stopped advanced pancreatic cancer growth in two patients and substantially reduced the size of a tumor in another patient, according to a small study published July 15 in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

    Significance of results
    In the Phase II M. D. Anderson study of 25 patients, curcumin was given on its own without chemotherapy.

    “The effects of curcumin were encouraging,” says the study’s principal investigator, Razelle Kurzrock, M.D., chair of M. D. Anderson’s Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (Phase I clinical trial program). “It showed activity in patients, and there were no side effects.”

    A concern before starting the study was that curcumin normally is poorly absorbed, meaning that only low levels get into the bloodstream after the capsule form has been taken by mouth.

    “Therefore, the fact that low levels of curcumin resulted in benefits in the study, even in a small number of patients, suggests that if we could find a better way to administer curcumin and get it to the tumor, we could see a greater response,” Kurzrock says.

    The fact that curcumin had any effect on patients with pancreatic cancer, which is difficult to treat successfully, is significant to Bharat Aggarwal, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Experimental Therapeutics.

    “The results are important,” says Aggarwal, a laboratory scientist who has studied curcumin as a potential cancer-fighting agent in cancer cells and mice for nearly 20 years.

    Research methods
    Patients received 8 grams of curcumin by mouth every day for two months. Maintenance therapy was continued at the same dose and schedule until the disease progressed.

    Primary results
    Twenty-five patients were reported in the paper.

    Of those patients, curcumin resulted in:

    Prolonged stable disease: Two patients temporarily experienced no significant tumor growth; one for eight months and another patient for just over 2.5 years (an additional 12 months after the study was compiled for publication).

    Tumor regression: One patient experienced a decrease in tumor size of 73%, although the tumor grew back soon afterward.

    “Interestingly, at the time of progression, the lesions that had shrunk remained small, but other lesions grew larger,” according to the study.

    “That suggests that a resistant clone of cancer cells emerged, which is a real problem in treating cancer,” Kurzrock says.

    In addition, no side effects were observed in patients.

    Background
    Curcumin is a substance that comes from the root-bearing Curcuma longa plant, a member of the ginger family. Curcumin is an ingredient in turmeric, a spice used in foods such as curry.

    Curcumin has been studied in numerous research studies and has been found to contain potential anti-tumor abilities.

    Curcumin is used in India as a:

    Food preservative
    Coloring agent for food and textiles
    Spice (2% to 5% of turmeric is curcumin)
    Folk medicine to:
    Cleanse the body
    Heal wounds
    Prevent wrinkles
    Suppress inflammation
    Knowledge of curcumin’s anti-inflammatory properties and the growing realization that cancer can result from inflammation has spurred mounting interest in the spice, Aggarwal says.

    The study was conceived and developed through a collaboration among Kurzrock, who chairs a department devoted to studies with new drugs; James Abbruzzese, M.D., chair of M. D. Anderson's Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and an expert in pancreatic cancer; and Aggarwal.

    Their work demonstrated that in laboratory and animal studies, curcumin was especially potent against pancreatic cancer.

    What’s next?
    Researchers are seeking funding for additional clinical trials using curcumin.

    “We plan to study curcumin together with other anti-cancer drugs, since combined therapy is likely to enhance results,” Kurzrock says. “In addition, we are developing a liposomal form of curcumin (curcumin packed within a fat-type capsule) that can be taken orally and travel directly through the bloodstream. Hopefully, this form will improve the ability of curcumin to reach the tumor.”

    Yikes!
    I just sent these comments to the lead researcher on the M.D.Anderson turmeric-pancreatic cancer Phase ll Trial. Asked if she could take a few minutes to comment on my concerns and apologized up front for the tone of my frustration, stating that lives were at stake. Perhaps she'll answer. Change requires some risk taking.
  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816

    Yikes!
    I just sent these comments to the lead researcher on the M.D.Anderson turmeric-pancreatic cancer Phase ll Trial. Asked if she could take a few minutes to comment on my concerns and apologized up front for the tone of my frustration, stating that lives were at stake. Perhaps she'll answer. Change requires some risk taking.

    In regards to Yikes! the doctor did respond almost immediately.
    Amazingly, I have already heard back from the doctor. She was kind enough to address all of my concerns, to my complete satisfaction, which I was going to put here. However, at the bottom of the email was this:

    CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: CONFIDENTIAL HEALTH INFORMATION ENCLOSED
    I had originally put the warning here but then I wondered if I could even do that, so deleted it.

    So, while I know, and am quite satisfied as to the reasoning behind the methodology, I am forbidden disseminating that information.

    Sorry,

    claudia
  • Gracegoi
    Gracegoi Member Posts: 59

    Carolen
    Hello, I was wondering if you had a list, or a url or some further info on the companions to vitamins, Vit E and Selenium is a start. Thanks.

    Rice ... black ,brown, or wild ?
    In Mary anns thread about the Cancer project there is some discussion about brown rice and acidity.

    http://csn.cancer.org/node/228792

    So I googled is brown rice acid and found this artical on Livestrong which says wild rice is or mostly is alkaline. I'm happy to hear this. I love wild rice.

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/518009-is-rice-acid-or-alkaline/

    About Black rice.

    A year ago I was in an oriental grocery store and saw a bag of black rice .This was new to me. It had a higher protien content so I tried it. I was not aware of its antioxidant benefits. I'm not that fond of the taste cooked . In this artical it recommends grinding the rice in a coffee grinder and sprinkling it on things. I'm excited to try this.

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/08/26/black.rice.new.brown/index.html



    Grace
  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816
    grace darling,
    It's good to see you are easily excited.
    Love ya, let me know how that goes.

    I do the same sort of thing with steel cut organic oats. I'll grind them up in my grain grinder, which is just a coffee grinder that I only use for oats and things, and then I use it like flour as a thickening agent or just add it to whatever. Helps if you mix it with water first or else added to something hot it can clump.

    Isn't clump an odd sort of word?
  • JoAnnDK
    JoAnnDK Member Posts: 275

    grace darling,
    It's good to see you are easily excited.
    Love ya, let me know how that goes.

    I do the same sort of thing with steel cut organic oats. I'll grind them up in my grain grinder, which is just a coffee grinder that I only use for oats and things, and then I use it like flour as a thickening agent or just add it to whatever. Helps if you mix it with water first or else added to something hot it can clump.

    Isn't clump an odd sort of word?

    Farro
    You might want to try this packed-with-protein grain which I have used a lot in the last months. Here is a link that tells of its properties, etc.

    http://endurancebuzz.com/2011/01/25/farro-a-low-gluten-grain-packed-with-protein/

    It is delicious in salads, soups, or by itself prepared as you would make a rice recipe.

    My natural-food store sells it by the pound. I like the semi-pearled version but any one is good.
  • RoseyR
    RoseyR Member Posts: 471
    Rewriter said:

    Just a thin slice of ginger...
    I cut a thin slice of ginger, chew it a little bit, and then keep it in my mouth for as long as I can. My goal is to do this daily. Then, I have a slice of whole meal toast with the olive oil, turmeric, and pepper combo--the heat of the toast warms up the olive oil for optimum effect. An hour later, I have an almond milk, flax seed, and banana smoothie. Alternately, I'll have oat bran with banana and almond milk. Lunch might be either a vegetable curry over quinoa or a raw kale salad with lemon/Parmesan dressing and toasted hazelnuts (the acid/alkaline components are balanced here; Parmesan is highly acidic). Dinner is a challenge but I try to keep it mostly alkaline. I never eat sugar; I do drink red wine a couple of times a week; and I have chicken or fish when my body craves it. This is just an example of a typical day for the purpose of giving some of the new women on this board an idea of how to incorporate an anticancer diet.

    WHOLE MEAL Toast?

    Jill,

    Sorry, but never heard of whole meal bread; where can I buy it?

    Love your lunch of vegetable curry over quinoa; came home from Indian restaturant two nights ago and used the leftovers the next sfternoon over quinoa--delicious!

    As for almond milk smoothies, do you ever add whey protein?

    Thanks,
    Rosey
  • Gracegoi
    Gracegoi Member Posts: 59

    grace darling,
    It's good to see you are easily excited.
    Love ya, let me know how that goes.

    I do the same sort of thing with steel cut organic oats. I'll grind them up in my grain grinder, which is just a coffee grinder that I only use for oats and things, and then I use it like flour as a thickening agent or just add it to whatever. Helps if you mix it with water first or else added to something hot it can clump.

    Isn't clump an odd sort of word?

    Purple pancakes
    Claudia My comrade,


    I put it in my six eggwhite ommlet flavored with Parmesan ( picked that up one morning from a female news anchor)

    Turned it purple and gave it a hint of pancake flavor. I could see young children getting a kick out of purple scrambled eggs.

    Not Blueberry waffels! HA HA

    My coffee grinder is wearing out so I'll get a new one for coffee and keep the old one for grains and herbs. Good thinking Girl! ;-)

    I grind up oats and lavender and mix with carrot juice and one egg white for a facial.

    Got the carrot juice and egg from Dr. Oz show. I added the lavender oats.


    Thanks for the Farro Joann. I have not heard of it. Thats a very helpful artical . Amazes me how sharing and helpful people are on the internet.

    Grace
  • Rewriter
    Rewriter Member Posts: 493
    Gracegoi said:

    Purple pancakes
    Claudia My comrade,


    I put it in my six eggwhite ommlet flavored with Parmesan ( picked that up one morning from a female news anchor)

    Turned it purple and gave it a hint of pancake flavor. I could see young children getting a kick out of purple scrambled eggs.

    Not Blueberry waffels! HA HA

    My coffee grinder is wearing out so I'll get a new one for coffee and keep the old one for grains and herbs. Good thinking Girl! ;-)

    I grind up oats and lavender and mix with carrot juice and one egg white for a facial.

    Got the carrot juice and egg from Dr. Oz show. I added the lavender oats.


    Thanks for the Farro Joann. I have not heard of it. Thats a very helpful artical . Amazes me how sharing and helpful people are on the internet.

    Grace

    moving to front
    Hope this gets the discussion going again.
  • zarkapopovic
    zarkapopovic Member Posts: 30
    Rewriter said:

    moving to front
    Hope this gets the discussion going again.

    Acrylamide
    Hi All,

    One contributing factor to endometrial and ovarian cancer is acrylamide: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/90823.php

    Acrylamide is created by certain cooking methods in carbohydrate foods. Review the article for more information.

    Zarka
  • Rewriter
    Rewriter Member Posts: 493

    Acrylamide
    Hi All,

    One contributing factor to endometrial and ovarian cancer is acrylamide: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/90823.php

    Acrylamide is created by certain cooking methods in carbohydrate foods. Review the article for more information.

    Zarka

    Diet
    I am moving this thread up because a few new people on this board have asked questions about an anti-cancer diet.


    Jill