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Food for Life Classes

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Well ladies, my husband and I started classes yesterday. I'm so glad he went with me (he's a prostate ca survivor) because he is getting terrific info first hand - instead of hearing it from me and not believing a word of it (can any of you relate to that???)

I think all this info has been discussed here but I did not always pay close attention to some of these concepts until I could "connect the dots"!

The key things I took away from the first class are:
1. HORMONES SPREAD CANCER. Diets with high fat and low fiber INCREASE ESTROGEN. FIBER helps rid the body of estrogen. Low fiber diets just allow estrogen to recycle through the bile ducts and liver and it is not released until FIBER can take it out!!!
2. DAIRY PRODUCTS BAD due to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). I'm p!!ssed that my doc said milk OK. I've been happily consuming this stuff till now (ignorance is bliss).
3. SOY GOOD despite having some estrogen. "Certain foods have special benefits. Soybeans, for example, contain natural compounds called phytoestrogens. These are very weak estrogens that can occipy the estrogen recetors on breast cells, displacing normal estrogens. The result is less estrogen stimulation of each cell. Soybeans are a mainstay of Asian diets and may be an additonal reason why these countries have low concer rates". Raw and organic soy the best.
4. GRILLED and FRIED MEAT CARCINOGENIC. It creates heterocyclic amines (HCA) due to high temps it is cooked at. Even browning meat creates this. (Goodbye my delicious pork tenderloin!!) They promoted PLANT-BASED DIET.

We enjoyed a dinner cooked there and served to us - whole grain penne pasta with kale and tomatoes, bean salad (super yummy), and chocolate mousse (made with soy). We enjoyed a smoothie of kale, soymilk, and fruit. They used soymilk with sugar. I will learn more about sugar in later classes. I purchased The Cancer Survivor's Guide which has these and more recipes.

All this information is available online @ cancerproject.org.

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

It is GREAT that your husband is going to your class and hear the info first hand! Husbands some times are like kids....they get "wife deaf".

I did print off the pages on transitioning to vegetarian as feel that would be a good move. I still eat too much beef, pork and chicken although greatly reduced. Although I don't drink milk I do LOVE cheese! I got some more work to do, obviously!!

Every time I make kale (in a salad or cooked) it is always so tough. Am thinking I am not doing it right or I have the wrong variety. Any suggestions?

Happy and healthy eating!

Karen

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Hi Karen,

They used kale that was chopped and washed in bag - convenient for sure. They said to pull off stem and chop well. When using in drink you have to blend it longer to break up the kale. You can also substitute collards for kale.

I also have much work to do - but we are on the right track. I continue to come into bloom!!!

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

Karen

Do you drink green juices?
Kale is great for that, the whole leave.

Also, I cook it with a little of olive oil,chard, spinach and collar greens. I add salt, pepper, powered garlic, onion, and of course turmeric.

Buena suerte!

PS: I also buy the green kale, the one that is not curly, and make potato/kale soup.
Just kale, potatoes, garlic salt and pepper. I remember Claudia mentioning once that some veggies were still good cooked, and I think kale is one of them.

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Thanks for the suggestions. I will keep trying! And now that it is getting chilly, soup is sounding even better! Think I need to remove more of the veins that seem to be tough.

No, I don't juice but my daughter does and she also mentioned how good the kale was. I have been "thinking" about it but haven't been motivated enough to invest in a juicer yet.

Thanks!
Karen

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

This is full of wonderful points....class was given by The Cancer Project? Noticed nothing held in my state - Missouri.

I've been going to a nutritionist whose a breast cancer survivor....feel she has some skin in the game therefore, tend to follow her more. One thing I learned watch the dairy products as the animals are ingested with hormones which we in turn, consume via their by-products. Also, what form of animals/humans consume dairy past infancy? We do!! Our bodies have difficulties ingesting, etc.

Soy? I've been told by my nutritionist and a prominent doc at UCLA whose an oncologist, watch soy -- too many unknowns on this product. Doc suggested I limit soy to 2 servicings per day. I only get this food in soy milk with my protein shake twice per day. When we don't consume dairy or meat we need to watch our protein and calcium intakes. Get it from other foods.

Meat? My nutritionist was first to tell me NO FOODS ON THE BBQ GRILL. Have read we can marinate the meats then place on grill, but haven't found any definitive research yet. I've solved this solution...don't eat meat.

Fish -- I do partake of fish, but must watch the mercury. Below is link for listing of the GOOD FISH to eat.

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx

My diet entails lots of plant foods -- vegies, fruits and legumes/beans and nuts. Purchase as much in "organic" side as I can find. Guess you can say pretty similar to being a vegetarian. I have never been a real eat meater, therefore, stopping meat was very easy. The dairy was a necessity with the hormones, so just learned to avoid cheese.

Love to hear what you find on "sugar". I avoid this as well, but occasionally partake of a shake container of Stevia in my iced green tea at dinner. When I have a sweet tooth attack, eat a few frozen grapes. Ever try them? Yummie! Just clean red grapes and place in bowl in freezer. When I want them pull off a few branches and eat away. Seems to hit the sweetness button!!

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Good feedback Jill. If anyone has questions I will bring them to next class. There are only 3 more class so they will go fast.

Mary Ann

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

You mean me, Jan? I'm anxious to see what they say about "sugar" as that could mean natural sugars in fruits or cane sugar. Plse keep me posted on this one.

Thanks
Jan

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 1160
Joined: Nov 2009

Thanks for the info!

I was told by my original gny/onc to stay away from Hormones too. He would not do hormone therapy on me. I was also told to stay away from soy. Its ok occasionally. That is for me, though.

With regard to dairy products, or as with anything, it is proportions and not to overdo it. If you are going to have dairy products, buy organic dairy which cows are grass fed without hormones, etc. same with chickens, etc.

My best to you and your husband on this!

Kathy

P.S. Eating food is all about balance. All meals should include fresh vegetables and fruit (regular portions sizes) and about a 5 or 6 oz entry of fish, chicken, meat. Also, snacks should be balanced - ex: fruit + a protein; yogurt + fruit. One without the other won't work. Balanced meals and snacks helps to eliminate toxins in the body, of course along with lots of water. (that is hard for me!)

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I'm definitely no expert, but hormone fed cows is not THE reason to avoid dairy......per this program. It's the fat, cholesterol, animal protein and connection to insulin-growth factor 1 that are the reasons. You can throw their feed in as frosting on the cake I guess..... Skim milk is not good for us either.

Someone mentioned this on another thread.....Only reason for milk is to help baby cows GROW. It promotes cancer growth. That's enough to convince me.

FAT impairs the body's immune system.

Jan, yes I meant YOU dear friend.

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1428
Joined: Jan 2009

Good Information. Glad to hear your husband is going to the classes, too. I know how some husbands tune out their wife's good advice. Hope you enjoy the rest of the classes. I look forward to looking up the web site for additional information. Glad you continue to feel well and are seeking new information. In peace and caring.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I will point out that the Cancer Project has a strong bias against consumption of any animal products. So that being said, here are notes from this week.

We enjoyed meal of brown rice with lentil/tomato/artichoke stew, ambrosia, and hummus veggie wrap on whole grain tortilla.

1. FAT in diet raises estrogen and testosterone levels contributing to breast and prostate cancers (and other hormone related ailments)
2. Optimal FIBER consumption is 40 grams daily - from combination of beans, whole (not refined or enriched) grains, veggies, fruits. Benefits by taking excess hormones and carcinogens out of the body. For every 14 grams of fiber calorie intake typically drops by 10%.
3. When shopping for bread look for whole grains as 1st ingredient and less than 20% fat content per serving
4. Re: consuming acid foods like brown rice. Eating a balanced plant-based diet should not turn body acid. Body does correct. That it is "splitting hairs" to avoid beneficial foods like brown rice. (Acid-avoiders ladies please don't shoot the messenger!!!)

There were several testimonials from people with serious health problems (including 40ish man with hx of acid reflux and obesity who had surgical treatment that failed and 30ish woman with MS) that said the plant-based diet has improved their health and lifestyle and they are no longer on any medicines.

The following info is aside from class:
1. STRESS will foster an acid body!!!!!
2. ACTIVATED CHARCOAL is good general aide for intestinal problems (diarrhea, gas), insect bites, cuts. It comes powdered & in capsules and can be used internally or topically. I never heard this! good to keep in our cars.

No sugar discussion yet - which I will ask about. But let me know your questions and I will ask. Mary Ann

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Maryann...so happy to see more good information.

Few things I'll comment on --

. Fiber ins diet is so, so important ---- foods aren't sitting in our systems, but flushed out via the proper diet. My nutritionist told me the average person should have 3 bowel movements per day.

. Bread -- have to agree about wanting "grained" breads and watch the ingredient count. First few items on ingredient list are weighted more with the product vs. last few. What I learned from someone else here, dig out our bread machines and make some good grain bread. Great way to monitor the ingredients, in fact, I've become quite creative with nuts and spices.

. Eating Alkaline diet (less acidic) -- Sticking with plant-based is what I'm always trying, plus our systems will normally self-monitor and adjust to the proper levels. Doesn't mean if we eat a lot of acidic foods it'll go to the alkaline side....we must do our part and stick with more plants in our diets. Heard things about brown rice with more acidic levels so I've switched to quinoa.

. Stress -- big one and agree!!! Get out our books from O. Carl Simonton, MD -- GETTING WELL AGAIN....calm our minds!

Thanks so much for sharing Ms.Mary Ann~

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

The recommendation is for balance in the acid/alkaline intake. When a person is ill the balance should be in the 80/20% range 20% being acid. This makes a dinner with beans, rice, and lots and lots of veggies or lemon juice-which becomes alkaline in the body. You could choose to ignore how much emphasis you put on striving for alkalinity, but if you tend to over consume acidic foods, even healthy one like brown rice and allow your body to self correct, the correction comes at the cost of loosing calcium from your bones, teeth and other cells. Also, acidic blood tends to clump and the cell wall to thicken.

As I rather like you, I would never consider shooting the messenger.

Probably the easiest way to learn of the experience of an overly acidic intake on the body is talk to someone who has gout and has consumed meat or alcohol recently, that is if you can get them to stop saying ow, ow , and hopping around in pain.

It's nice to hear that you are enjoying your classes so much, and especially nice of you to share your experiences here.

Claudia

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

While eliminating meat from your diet once diagnosed with cancer is a very good idea, that step alone is not the whole story. If your reasons are not wholly because you feel eating animals is not right and you are doing it strictly because of the highly acidic nature of the meat itself, you are on the right track.

Becoming a vegetarian can be beneficial. However, even in the vegetarian world, there still exist acidic and alkaline foods. Grains, and cheeses are acidic. Sodas, artificial sweeteners, sugars, white flour, processed cereals, coffee, alcohol are highly, highly acidic. So one can be a vegetarian or vegan and still have a diet that supports cancer growth and bone loss. Even black tea is somewhat acidic. Green tea fights cancer, especially when taken only with lemon and steeped for thirty minutes.

It is the totality of your actions that set the stage for your future health. Even whether or not your life in general causes you stress is relevant. A body under stress puts immune function on hold to fight what it considers a more pressing matter, as the immediate threat of danger trumps all else, survival is the key.

A person going out to dinner and having a drink, a steak, and dessert, is not doing themselves any favors, except their stress level would be pretty low, so there's that. A person going to a fast food restaurant and having the typical burger, diet soda and fries, that person is living in the worst of all worlds, as the acidic content, not to mention the fat and salt, are not their friends, nor is the atmosphere, unless you like that sort of thing. Their cancer is living it up, and busily dividing like nobody's business.

Knowing and focusing on those foods that are anti angiogenesis(angiogenesis is the establishment of a new blood supply to a growing turmor, without this new blood supply, your cancer cannot grow large enough to do you any damage) is extremely beneficial. Keeping a tumor from establishing a new blood supply is one of, if not the key goal if the objective is to survive, even with cancer.(in the Dietary thread started by Jill is a list of anti angio foods)

A vegetarian or a person eating very, very little meat, while eating a preponderance of rice, beans, and cheese with a little ice cream and coffee on the side, as I had been when I got cancer, is also not doing themselves any favors. On the other hand if that same person puts the balance of their diet into the vegetable side of the vegetarian diet, with beans, rice and cheese on the side, that would be entirely different and a step in the right direction.

If I had known then what I know now, I seriously doubt I would find myself in this situation.

txtrisha55's picture
txtrisha55
Posts: 424
Joined: Apr 2011

I looked on the Cancer Project web page and found that there will be classes on November 14 in Hurst, Texas at the Hurst Senior Center. The class is titled: Introduction to How Foods Fight Cancer. Here is the link if in this area.

http://www.cancerproject.org/resources/classes/cookingClass.cfm?classID=1780

trish

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

for not shooting me!!!!

Just a reminder, CHEESE is made from milk (animal product).

The bottom line for these classes is PLANT based only...and as LITTLE processing as possible. For example, tofu is processed soy - eat soybeans (edemame) instead.

They do realize that busy people are not always able to cook from scratch so frozen and canned foods are not discouraged. And organic is best but washing non-organic is the next best thing rather than NOT EATING AT ALL.

I guess common sense can rule!! Eat healthy friends and enjoy a wonderful weekend.

PS, An exciting side benefit is that my husband is "getting motivated" (his words). He is reading labels and pointed out to me the pumpkin muffins that I bought at Sam's Club (yes, horrors of horrors) had 100 calories each!!! Yeah Rudy!!! I'm taking these to a pot luck on Sat - I probably should throw them out, though.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Guess only way my hubbie will get on board, have a diagnosis of a disease such as cancer....think? He's trying, but only when I put it in front of him to eat and offer no other alternative. If I keep the "forbidden" foods in our home, he'll eat it until it's gone...ouchie! One day something might get him, but then again, I've got my own plate to worry about....way too much stress worrying about him as well. I usually try a few jabs about things I read, etc, and some do stick.

HAPPY EATING...

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

only reason he is changing his thinking (actions slower) is because he's hearing this from someone other that ME!!!!

I have no delusions, but continue hopeful that "old dogs can learn new tricks"! I'm just glad he agreed to attend this class! Good luck with yours.

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

Since you are taking questions, what about eating fish?

I live in San Diego, CA. There is a Cancer Center at UCSD that offers cooking classes once a month. However, I went once or twice while getting chemo and I was disappointed to see they used chicken and sugar. I never went back.

Please let us know about sugar, fish and eggs.

Gracias!

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I've asked this same question -- what about fish!!! I eat no meat or chicken, but yes some fish. Know we have to look for the pluses -- omega 3's and risks -- MERCURY OR PCB's. The easiest way, print out each of the pocket guides per below links. Carry with you when shopping for fish.....very helpful! If I could get round everything packaged in "plastic" we'd be even better, but not always possible. Do what we can!!

Fish does give us a good days allotment of protein and if remembering, you were a while back trying to increase your protein intake. How are you doing now? Find some good options?

Know what you mean about many recipes headlined as "natural" and "good for us"...yeah sure!! By the time I read the ingredients I want to throw them away -- sugar, flour, salt etc. Not my idea of "good for us" recipes.

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx

http://www.edf.org/sites/default/files/1980_pocket_seafood_selector.pdf

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

The anti-inflammatory diet that was promoted here quite a bit calls for at least 3 servings of oily/fatty fish a week. Also calls for whole grains, in pastas and other forms.

Oily/fatty fish are salmon, bluefish, mackerel, sardines, trout, and tuna.

JoAnn

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

.....

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

Thanks Mary Ann for sharing about what your learning at the Cancer project. There are so few of these courses available this month.

I'm intrested in protein alternatives. I see they are not keen on proccesed soy. I use TVP in a few things . I wonder what they think of that.

I found this artical about rice and alkalinity with good news about wild rice.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/518009-is-rice-acid-or-alkaline/

Black rice has extra benifits and has a higher protien content. I could not find out if its acid or alkaline.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/08/26/black.rice.new.brown/index.html

Grace

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Ladies,

I have learned so much in these last 4 weeks. Though not a vegan I have greatly reduced my consumption of animal products (including fish and eggs) because they are directly linked to increased carcinogens. I have increased my legumes and grains/seeds. I really appreciate the power of simple foods like carrots and broccoli. I never knew how great Brazil nuts are.

Key points from last 2 classes:
• Anti-oxidants are cellular protectors and important to boost natural killer (NK) immunity building white blood cells
• Orange, red, and green leafy foods are high in anti-oxidants. Carrots and broccoli are superstars.
• At least 5mg/d of beta-carotene can double the cancer survival rate
• Best to get nutrients from food. More is not necessarily better. Supplements can upset the balance and actually give negative effect (increase cancer!). Cited studies about this. Vit C was exception.
• Cruciferous veggies help eliminate toxins
• Fat HINDERS NK cells
• Typically vegans have twice number of NK cells.
• Broccoli is 40% protein. Eating broccoli regularly will immediately improve NK cells.
• Eat fresh as possible. Once off the plant, they continually lose nutrition.
• Dried fruit has added sugar – except raisins.
• Simple and processed sugars not good. Sugar in fruits OK.
• Baking powder can have aluminum in it. Look for aluminum free on label. This shocked me
• Buy organic if possible, but don’t avoid if you can’t find organic (wash well obviously). Look for non-GMO (not genetically modified) on labels. Genetically modified foods have chemicals.
• Nutritional yeast flakes gives cheesy flavor to foods.
• For bouillon Maggi brand recommended, also Bill’s Best Seasoning and McKay’s (check Country Life Natural Foods to order online)
* add garlic to anything you can
* grilled chicken has highest level of HCAs (carcinogens) in American diet!!!

TABLE 10 Antioxidant minimum daily target – from Chapter 5 (see comment below)
ANTIOXIDANT WOMEN (14–70< Y) MEN (14–70< Y)
beta-carotene 800 mcg 1,000 mcg (5 mg can double survival odds)
selenium 55 mcg 55 mcg (macadamia nuts are best source)
vitamin C 75 mg 90 mg. (200 mg can double survival odds)
vitamin E 15 mg 15 mg

Food superstars that jump out at me are:
• Beta- carotene in highest order are pumpkin, yams, carrots
• Lycopene – tomato juice, tomato based sauce
• Vit E and Selenium – Brazil nuts (even just one a day exceeds all other foods!), barley
• Phytochemicals – guava, raw red bell pepper, kiwi, orange juice

In the class I purchased the book The Cancer Survivor’s Guide for $20. You can purchase through Cancerproject.org or download a PDF version for FREE (They ask for donation). It has good info explained in simple terms, it has yummy recipes. At least read Chapter 5 which has excellent explanation of foods to eat, avoid, and rationale about supplements.

Other resources are happyherbivore.com
Get 50 free pieces of literature for free at cancerproject.org/lit
Book Diet for a Small Planet has more sources of protein
For Another free cookbook fortmyerschip.com

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

for all of this invaluable information. Much of the information that you share validates the way that I eat and gives good reasons for the suggestions. I plan to read through everything very carefully over the next few days, as the cooler weather here is inspiring me to cook up a storm and then freeze some soups and stews. I'm happy to see that many of the ingredients I use are on the superfoods list.

I know that sharing this information must have been time-consuming for you, but I for one so appreciate it.

All the best,

Jill

P.S. Now how can I balance the prosciutto, rice balls, mozzarella cheese, and olive bread that my visiting friend wants tonight? LOL

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Hi Jill, Yes, it took time but well worth it. I appreciate all that others have provided for "the cause". I do think you are eating exceptionally well. I plan to purchase Brazil nuts and crush them and sprinkle on foods. Lots cheaper and better than the Vit E and Selenium supplements I used to take.

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Mary Ann....many thanks for sharing all of this good information. It is nice to know WHY something is good and not so good! It does reinforce that I am moving in the right direction. And the best part is that I love so many of the "good for you" foods....sweet potatoes, broccoli, carrots, etc.

I remember hearing about Brazil nuts before but then forgot about them...so this was a good reminder to get going on this simple change!

I too appreciate all of the time to pull your notes together and share them so graciously with us.

What I find is that I read something and think....Oh, I need to add that, but then I forget. Repetition helps this old chemo brain!

Thanks!

Karen

snowbird_11's picture
snowbird_11
Posts: 160
Joined: Oct 2011

Adding my thanks too Mary Ann! And, as Karen noted, the reinforcement by repetition is so very helpful. You have done an excellent job synthesizing all so succinctly.

The superfoods list made me feel a little better about my diet which I worry is less than perfect, but last night I snacked on organic raw carrots as I made my fresh pumpkin soup which included some orange mango juice topped with a dollop of organic nonfat Greek yogurt, chopped fresh cilantro and green onion sprinkled with cayenne, and served with fresh steamed broccoli with lemon and, a fudge item, baked salmon with a blueberry sauce ;-) One step at a time to good health!

Thanks for helping me along!
Annie

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Mary Ann,

These classes really brought a lot of information out and happy you can pass it to us.

As with a few others, reading about many foods that today I've added to my diet....so I'm happy. One thing I learned we need selenium and I'm big on getting vitamins from my foods and to get this vitamin all we need to eat is 2-3 brazil nuts...bingo!

Nutritional yeast flakes...never heard of this product. Assuming this can be purchased at Whole Foods...check next trip.

Love the new books...will look them up. Always open to new ideas.

Thanks my friend,
Jan

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

A million thanks,

Claudia

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

You take excellent notes Mary Ann,

I stopped taking my vitamin supliments a while back .I was prescribed a low dose antibiotic twice a day and some vitamins inhibited the effectiveness so I got out of my routine of having them in the morning. Maybe thats a good thing.

I was taking selenium in the mix . 250 mg. I belive selinium comes from the soil . Makes sense some nuts might have high concentrations .

Brazil nuts have the highest fat content so Im more than fond of them.

Nuts for me are out . Thats because Im addicted to them as well as bread and cheese and anything sweet.

I tried almonds and brazil nuts and sunflower seeds after my diagnosis thinking I could handel them . Nope! They drive me nuts! Im too weak. Id have to buy just ten almonds or three brazil nuts at a time and that would look really wierd at the whole foods check out line.

Bieng a food addict is the pits . I was that long befor I got cancer. It's alot like cancer in theres no Off button for foods that taste REALLY good.

I didn't know Broccoli had so much protien. Yippee!

Thanks for sharing Mary Ann.

Grace

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