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Test Results In

Spydergal
Spydergal Member Posts: 54

I found my biopsy results on MOFFITT patient portal, I have an appointment in two weeks with the doctor to find out what these actually mean. I am cutting and pasting it here hoping that you ladies can tell Me what these results mean and what should be my next steps.

Surgical Pathology Final Report

10/7/2021 13:34 EDT 10/7/2021 15:15 EDT

  A. ECC#1:

Scattered/rare benign endocervical cells and superficial squamous cells

Comment: One block is reviewed after cell block preparation

B. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 1: Benign endometrial polyp

Negative for hyperplasia/malignancy

C. ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS # 1:

Scant clusters of benign/inactive type endometrial surface epithelium Benign superficial squamous epithelium

D. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 2: Benign endometrial polyp

E. ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS # 2:

Scant clusters of benign/inactive type endometrial surface epithelium Benign superficial squamous epithelium

F. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 3: Benign endometrial polyp

G. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 4: Benign endometrial polyp

I, ARDESHIR HAKAM MD ,the attending pathologist, personally reviewed all slides and/or materials and rendered or confirmed the final diagnosis Electronically Signed Out by ARDESHIR HAKAM MD 10.11.21 14:37 PM

AH

Specimen(s) Received

A ECC #1

B ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #1

C ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS #1

D ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #2

E ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS #2

F ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #3

G ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #4

Clinical History

abnormal bleeding, abnormal endometrial thickness

 

 Pathology Reports

 ACCESSION: SP-21-0016034 COLLECTED DATE/TIME: 10/7/2021 13:34 EDT RESPONSIBLE HAKAM MD,ARDESHIR RECEIVED DATE/TIME: 10/7/2021 15:15 EDT PATHOLOGIST:

Gross Description

A. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "ECC number one". The specimen consists of scant blood. The specimen is spun down, processed into a cell block using standard techniques and submitted in A1.

B. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number one". The specimen consists of a pink, oval, rubbery polyp that measures 3.7 x 0.4 x 0.3 cm. The surgical margin is inked black. The specimen is bisected and entirely submitted in B1 and B2.

C. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial curettings number one". The specimen consists of scant blood. The specimen is spun down, processed into a cell block using standard techniques and submitted in C1.

D. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number two". The specimen consists of two pink, oval, rubbery polyp fragments that measure 1.4 x 0.9 x 0.3 cm. The surgical margin is inked black. The larger fragment is bisected. The specimen is entirely submitted in D1.

E. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial curettings number two". The specimen consists of mostly blood. The specimen is spun down, processed into a cell block using standard techniques and submitted in E1.

F. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number three". The specimen consists of multiple pink, oval, soft polyp fragments that measure 1.2 x 0.7 x 0.2 cm in aggregate, which are entirely submitted in F1.

G. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number four". The specimen consists of a pink, oval, soft polyp that measures 1.5 x 1.3 x 0.2 cm. The surgical margin is inked black. The specimen is trisected and entirely submitted in G1.

PP 10/07/2021 17:26:29

Performing Location

The physician professional service reflected in this report was performed at Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 USF Magnolia Dr. Tampa FL, 33612. CLIA # 10D0290540

The facility technical service reflected in this report was performed at Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 USF Magnolia Dr. Tampa FL, 33612. CLIA # 10D0290540

  ACCESSION: RESPONSIBLE PATHOLOGIST:

Final Diagnosis

Surgical Pathology Final Report

SP-21-0016034 COLLECTED DATE/TIME: HAKAM MD,ARDESHIR RECEIVED DATE/TIME:

Surgical Pathology Final Report

10/7/2021 13:34 EDT 10/7/2021 15:15 EDT

A. ECC#1:

Scattered/rare benign endocervical cells and superficial squamous cells

Comment: One block is reviewed after cell block preparation

 

 ACCESSION: SP-21-0016034 RESPONSIBLE HAKAM MD,ARDESHIR PATHOLOGIST:

Final Diagnosis

B. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 1: Benign endometrial polyp

Negative for hyperplasia/malignancy

COLLECTED DATE/TIME: RECEIVED DATE/TIME:

10/7/2021 13:34 EDT 10/7/2021 15:15 EDT

C. ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS # 1:

Scant clusters of benign/inactive type endometrial surface epithelium Benign superficial squamous epithelium

D. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 2: Benign endometrial polyp

E. ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS # 2:

Scant clusters of benign/inactive type endometrial surface epithelium Benign superficial squamous epithelium

F. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 3: Benign endometrial polyp

G. ENDOMETRIAL POLYP # 4: Benign endometrial polyp

Surgical Pathology Final Report

 I, ARDESHIR HAKAM MD ,the attending pathologist, personally reviewed all slides and/or materials and rendered or confirmed the final diagnosis Electronically Signed Out by ARDESHIR HAKAM MD 10.11.21 14:37 PM

AH

Specimen(s) Received

A ECC #1

B ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #1

C ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS #1

D ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #2

E ENDOMETRIAL CURETTINGS #2

F ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #3

G ENDOMETRIAL POLYP #4

Clinical History

abnormal bleeding, abnormal endometrial thickness

Gross Description

A. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "ECC number one". The specimen consists of scant blood. The specimen is spun down, processed into a cell block using standard techniques and submitted in A1.

B. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number one". The specimen consists of a pink, oval, rubbery polyp that measures 3.7 x 0.4 x 0.3 cm. The surgical margin is inked black. The specimen is bisected and entirely submitted in B1 and B2.

C. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial curettings number one". The specimen consists of scant blood. The specimen is spun down, processed into a cell block using standard techniques and submitted in C1.

 

 Surgical Pathology Final Report

 ACCESSION: SP-21-0016034 COLLECTED DATE/TIME: 10/7/2021 13:34 EDT RESPONSIBLE HAKAM MD,ARDESHIR RECEIVED DATE/TIME: 10/7/2021 15:15 EDT PATHOLOGIST:

Gross Description

D. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number two". The specimen consists of two pink, oval, rubbery polyp fragments that measure 1.4 x 0.9 x 0.3 cm. The surgical margin is inked black. The larger fragment is bisected. The specimen is entirely submitted in D1.

E. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial curettings number two". The specimen consists of mostly blood. The specimen is spun down, processed into a cell block using standard techniques and submitted in E1.

F. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number three". The specimen consists of multiple pink, oval, soft polyp fragments that measure 1.2 x 0.7 x 0.2 cm in aggregate, which are entirely submitted in F1.

G. Received in formalin labeled with the patient's name, medical record number and designated "endometrial polyp number four". The specimen consists of a pink, oval, soft polyp that measures 1.5 x 1.3 x 0.2 cm. The surgical margin is inked black. The specimen is trisected and entirely submitted in G1.

PP 10/07/2021 17:26:29

Performing Location

The physician professional service reflected in this report was performed at Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 USF Magnolia Dr. Tampa FL, 33612. CLIA # 10D0290540

The facility technical service reflected in this report was performed at Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 USF Magnolia Dr.

Comments

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 2,928 **
    a lot of "benign" which is

    a lot of "benign" which is great news!  It looks great to this lay person's eyes.  Anyone else, am I reading this wrong?

  • Dak82
    Dak82 Member Posts: 92
    Ditto

    I read it the same way. Lots to be relieved about.

    Deb

  • Harmanygroves
    Harmanygroves Member Posts: 294 **
    Ben-versus Mal--

    Benigh is (latin root BEN--) which means GOOD. Benign is harmless. 

    Malignant is (latin root MAL--) which means BAD. Malignant is harmful.

     

    I do believe you got a good report here, Spydergal! I would ask about those scattered squamous cells from your endocervical region. 

  • Spydergal
    Spydergal Member Posts: 54
    edited October 18 #5
    Scattered Squamous Cells Concerning me

    Yes those scattered squamous cells is what I am worried about. I don't understand either why those wouldn't have been detected in my pap smear. Everything else sounded like I was cancer free but I'm concerned that those squamous cells could be precancerous or a early warning sign. I still want a hysterectomy and hope my insurance will pay for it because of the 13 mm endometrial lining and four polyps they removed. I believe keeping my cervix, uterous and ovaries after this is an accident  waiting to happen, so to speak. None of this growth is normal and a precursor of cancer down the road. Has anybody here had a similar situation that lead to cancer later? 

  • Harmanygroves
    Harmanygroves Member Posts: 294 **
    For now, you can worry just a little less!

    We aren't doctors here, although we should be. Just give it all a bit of a rest until you can get debriefed by the doc. Standing by to see what they say, and I hope that you can take a little comfort in all the "benigns."

  • oldbeauty
    oldbeauty Member Posts: 319 **
    edited October 18 #7
    I agree with you.

    Spydergal, this was my immediate reaction.  I would research squamous cells and express concern about their being precancerous.  I would push for a hysterectomy and prod the doctor to find it "medically necessary" if the doc can't give you a reasonably reliable assurance that they won't develop into EC.  Have a witness or record that consultation.  That might seal the deal in getting doc's help with any fight with the insurer.  I just had a squamous cell carcinoma dug out of my back.  Good luck.  Best wishes, Oldbeauty

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 597 **
    Squamous cells

    are a type of cell, not cancer.    Copied from healthmatters.io

     

    Epithelial cells are a type of cell that lines the surfaces of your body.. They are found on the following locations in your body: - your skin - blood vessels, - urinary tract, - and organs. The most common type of cell seen in the urine sediment is the squamous epithelial cell.A squamous epithelial cell is a large flattened cell with abundant cytoplasm and small round central nucleus.

  • jan9wils
    jan9wils Member Posts: 172
    This all sounds like good

    This all sounds like good news to me.  That said, my sister had a hysterectomy that insurance covered. She didn't have cancer or bleeding but was concerned about getting cancer after we lost one sister to ovarian cancer and my and my niece's endometrial cancer dx. Her doctor found it medically necessary. 

    Jan

  • Spydergal
    Spydergal Member Posts: 54
    So squamous cells are normal

    So squamous cells are normal and nothing to be worried about? I'm thrilled everything says benig. Benign is a beautiful word to me. I am so relieved that I cried as I the report, tears of thankfulness, gratefulness and relief. 

  • Spydergal
    Spydergal Member Posts: 54
    I am Grateful

    having had four polyps as well as the lining removed leaves me concerned yet grateful at the same time. I worry because my body produced polyps which isn't normal as well as overproducing cells in the endometrial lining. Yes they were benign, Thank God; however, those polyps Shouldn't have occured in the first place. Since my body produced those, I'm concerned that next time I might not be so lucky. I will definitely feel way better once I have had a hysterectomy and removed the risk. I think I'll always have a lingering fear of cancer occurring somewhere and someday in the future. I thought because so many in my family died from cancer that I would be spared and so I never imagined it could happen to me. Yeah, that's obviously warped and ridiculous thinking but I'm an imperfect human. I am going to continue To enjoy all the beauty around me, every flower, tree, owl hoots and birds songs, sound of waves crashing on the beach, the scent Of - roses, magnolias, salt water and even the musk of my ferrets(lol) and The love of my friends and family. I post here my appreciation of every woman on here for your encouragement, support, bravery, advice, information, and more. Thank You my sisters. I will continue to update you and try to give you love and support and encouragement. You are AWESOME Ladies. DMP

  • Spydergal
    Spydergal Member Posts: 54
    edited October 27 #12
    Grateful to You All, I am cancer free

    I saw Dr Wenham yesterday to hear the results of my DNC biopsy results, actually he explained what the results of the onocologist's report meant. He told me that the Scattered/rare benign endocervical cells and superficial squamous cells are nothing to worry about because their benign,He saw nothing abnormal. He told me that my endometrial lining was not 13 mm, that in fact it was normal. It was the polyps that made the lining look thick in the sonogram. He recommended of course that I be closely followed by my gynecologist . He told me that if I ever have spotting or cramping again don't wait to see your gynecologist. I feel Soooooo much better now, I finally got to sleep last night. Despite feeling relieved that I don't have cancer, thank God, I still worry that I'm more at risk for cancer than somebody who has never had all these polyps and squamous cells. I never worried about these type cancers before, hell I didn't even think about it, let alone worry about ever getting this. Before my accident when I saw (which is pretty infrequent) an AKA I never thought about what is was like to live like that, I had both my legs. I felt bad for them, if I saw they needed a door opened or help picking something up they dropped I would certainly help them. But then I had the accident and became an AKA myself. I learned how scary, painfull, stressfull, etc cancer was only because I had several family members die from cancers. We remain ignorant to physical disabilities and diseases until it's close to home, that's human nature. I was ignorant to the cancers you ladies are fighting until I was at risk of being one of you.I had no clue how difficult the treatments were nor the emotions, fears and struggles involved. You ladies are proof of how women are sisters, no matter our race, religion, financial status or nationality. When one of us is down, others are there to help her up. That is what you ladies have done for me. You gave me the information and advice I needed to choose the best path, you supported me and helped me through the fears I felt about not knowing if I had cancer or not. I love every damn one of you, THANK YOU ALL. I hope you'll be cool about me coming on here from time to time to check how everyone is doing. I still have limited knowledge to offer but I can still offer my encouragement and be emotionally supportive. Hugs to all of you. Donna-Spydergal

  • cmb
    cmb Member Posts: 749 **
    edited October 27 #13
    Enjoy!

    I'm very glad to hear that you got the official word from the doctor that you are cancer-free. Such a relief!

    But as you might remember, I had a benign polyp and years later, developed uterine cancer. Of course, I didn't know at the time that I had a genetic mutation that predisposed me to several types of cancer.

    While I'm not an advocate for unnecessary surgeries, your recent experience and past issues suggest that a hysterectomy might be something to pursue down the road.

    But for now, just enjoy the feeling of being cancer-free.

  • Harmanygroves
    Harmanygroves Member Posts: 294 **
    Spydergal!

    You are such a sweet person, and I'm SO HAPPY for you! You've been through enough! I'm glad you will be keeping an eye on your health, and don't be a stranger. Pop in anytime! We will be here.

    Deb 2