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Eye Issue

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

Went to eye optamologist yesterday, first time in about four years.  I have not been able to see propery for some time now.   He cut the appointment short, said he had to refer me to a specialist for 'advanced, wet-type macular degeneration.'  I am not familiar with this, but he said that it is controllable in many cases, but irreversable.  Said I am close to blindness level of involvement.  I have not read that this condition could be chemo-related, but I do know that cataracts are strongly related to Prednisone use.  If anyone has had macular degineration issues post-chemo, I am interested in hearing about what they learned.

 

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po18guy
Posts: 1222
Joined: Nov 2011

I certainly had cataracts, and a torn retina several weeks post cataract surgery. But, my tear was on the periphery, so my central vision is fine, but when I first wake up, there is a shadow in the left corner of my left eye. It goes away after a few seconds (so far), but is a result of the tear. I am taking an AREDS supplement sold by the retina surgeons to help slow everything down. If you need surgery, this is one of those emergent situations in which a consult on Friday might have you in the O.R. on Sat or Mon. Age-related, at least we have some hope of slowing it.

I'm thinking that in the case of macular degeneration, you might well consider a clinical trial, as progress against this condition is badly needed. Odd that micro veins are involved. I don't know if that is a type of angiogenesis in which vascular growth is triggered by some factor or not. The really odd thing is that steroid use can cause avascular necrosis, in which veins - normally to the hips or knees - wither and die. 

Is there a way to decrese the size or number of veins behind the macula? A question begging an answer. Do you know if it is at all related to inter-ocular pressure? I am prescribed nightly drops to decrease that pressure. So many questions. 

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

Po,  as the news agencies would say, this is a 'developing story.'   The usual causes of m.d. are not known, except that it virtually never occures in anyone under age 50, and most cases begin only after 60.   As I noted, the O.D. stopped the exam about as soon as he began, realizing that my case was out of his realm.  I will note for clarity to the readers that I never took Prednisone, which R-ABVD does not use.  He did get far enough to say that no perscription could currently better my vision beyond about 20-50. And he repeated that I have pretty bad cataracts -- something I have known for about seven years now.   My vision has been like looking through a sheet of wax paper for a few years.  I do not yet have any center-of-field blindness.  It is interesting but likely not etiologically relevant that the night of my severe auto crash decades ago, I was totally blind the whole night, but could see the next day.  No doctor has ever had an explanation for that. About four years ago I began having 'lighting bolts,' and the only known cause for those is retinal detachment, but I went to the doctor at that time, and she said I had no trace of r.d.  The flashes quit about a month later, and have not returned.

The eye MD/surgeon's office called today.   Regarding decreasing the size of the veins behind the macula, yes, there are needle injections which address this, and I understand that they are most often at least partially effective.  My appointment is not until August 16.

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po18guy
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Joined: Nov 2011

It sems that all cancer sites, sooner or later, end up dealing with geriatric issues. The body reminds if the spirit forgets it age. If they can do the cataracts while performing whatever is deemed appropriate for the MD, it might be a chance at a two-fer. It is so nice to see clearly again. 

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Rocquie
Posts: 857
Joined: Mar 2013

I am so sorry to hear about your vision. I did get cataracts from prednisone and had surgery a couple years ago. I respect your optomitrist for recognizing your vision problems are beyond the scope of his practice. Perhaps you start with omiting the cataracts.

While on chemo, I experienced the flashing lights in my eyes you describe. And a couple times, I was blinded. It was diagnosed as silent migraines and it stopped once I completed chemo. Each episode would last about an hour.

Last year, my Mother had atrial fibrillation and was put on Eloquis, a blood thinner. Not too much later she was diagnosed with wet macular degeneration--not cancer related. The cardiologist said the drug was not responsible. The  eye doctor said it could be. She had shots in her eye several times but it was decided it wasn't working.  Thankfully, it is only in one eye. So she can still see fine with the other eye; she even reads the newspaper each morning. By the way, Mama is much older than you--she is almost 94.

Hugs and prayers,

Rocquie

 

 

 

ShadyGuy
Posts: 709
Joined: Jan 2017

I started having flashes of "lightning bolts" in my eyes while on a business trip several years back before diagnosis with lymphoma. It was diagnosed as vitreous detachment. Vitreous detachment is often caused by sudden impact such as a traffic accident or fall and aging. Max I know you had a terrible traffic accident. Mine (probably but not certainly) was caused by a suicide explosion at a shopping mall in Netanya Israel. I was walking about 1/2 block away. Just a thought and may be worth asking about. Laser surgery helped mine and the "lightning bolts" are no longer an issue.

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

Thanks to all responders.   I have a cousin who developed acute leukemia several years ago, and one of the chemo drugs she took left her almost totally blind within a few months.  I do not know which drug, but will ask her to look into it.  In general, I do not recall mention in the past of a chemo agent that causes blindness.   She can make out blurry grey shapes, so is not in total blackout.  And she is N.E.D. today.

Shady, the bomb blast experience was interesting but very unfortunate.  In the submarine service, there were certain things that at times (but rarely) produced dangerous decible levels.   I did not have known head injury when admittted to ICU following the wreck, but 10 weeks later, my ear itched, and I pulled out a hunk of windshield glass, so there was definite head impact.  I later asked how a person could be in the hospital for eight weeks (mostly in ICU), and not have someone look in their ears, but never got an answer.  I recently re-met my old friend severe vertigo, which I have had off-and-on since the wreck.  My G.P. told me yestereday that I likely suffered a microfracture somewhere near the inner ear canal.

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po18guy
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Joined: Nov 2011

Submarine service and pilots. Is there any correlation to MD?

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

PO,

M.D. is not linked to pressure, based on what I have read so far.  It is not even linked to glaucoma, so I doubt there is a link.    Interesting is the fact that to be admitted into the submarine force, you must undergo ear-equalization tests.   Put inside a large white cylinder at Submarine School New London (Connecticut), that looks about like an PL gas tank.  The cylinder seats about a dozen guys at a time.  It is sealed, and the air pressure is jacked way up, so high that if you cannot equalize pressure, your ear drums will rupture.    In other words, no way to fake an ability to equalize !  Pressure increases dramatically as a sub goes deep, such that if a string is tied taut from one side of the hull across to the to the other side, by the time the boat is way deep, the string is hanging loose.....

Greatest song regarding 'pressure' ever, and even has a line about '....like a blind man.'   Also rated as one of the greatest-ever basslines in rock history.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoDh_gHDvkk

Coupe35
Posts: 45
Joined: Feb 2010

There are things they can do for wet eye but dry eye which is what I have is another story. I asked the eye doctor how do we treat it. I could not believe what he told me. Take a vitamine and eat salads. Now we have close to 100 years of achievements in medicine and that is all they have. Unreal

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

I can relate, obviously, Coupe.    M.D. is one of the leading causes of blindness, but is the only common eye disease that is totally non-operable.  Glaucoma, cataracts, retna detachment -- all operable.

I have been reading a bit, and the vitimans apparently are fairly effective.  Read the "ARES-2" information online.   I see the doc on the 16th, and will relate whatever I learn.

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po18guy
Posts: 1222
Joined: Nov 2011

That despite the decades and billions of dollars spent, all that medical science really cures is infection. It cannot cure diabetes, heart conditions, and virtually all other medical maladies. In our world, we come out better than many. There is nothing that will put confgestive heart failure into remission, for example. 

ShadyGuy
Posts: 709
Joined: Jan 2017

We are certainly mortal and seem to have evolved with a limited lifespan.

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

George C. Scott's famous outburst in The Hospital (1971, Acadamy Award winner) could certainly be a fitting slogan for the AMA:  We heal nothing,we cure nothing, the whole '''' ''''' world is stangulating before our eyes." 

Besides congestive heart failure, modern medicine can do very close to nothing for serious mental diseases, whether psychosis or dementia/Alzheimer's sorts of conditions.  Regarding addictions, no hope; behaviorial changes, but no cures.  M.S., ALS are more-or-less untreatable, except for some pallative drugs.   The same for Parkinson's.   When a new 'life-extending' drug, that will increase life by perhaps two months is developed for a few billion dollars, and then sold to the patient for $50,000 an injection, it is praised as 'wonderful.'   We think small, and expect little, from medical research.  And are never surprised or disappointed.  Robert Frost wrote a poem about how people flock to the beach, and gaze outwards for hours, like moths before a light bulb.  It too is an epithet for medical researchers:

They cannot look out far

They cannot look in deep

But when was ever that a bar

To any watch they'd keep ?

 

ShadyGuy
Posts: 709
Joined: Jan 2017

a horse, my kingdom for a horse! $50k for another two months? Sold! The dead cannot spend money. Life is priceless.

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

"...a horse is a horse of course of course."     Date yourself by identifying where that line is from.

 

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Sandy Ray
Posts: 130
Joined: May 2017

Max,

Sorry forgot my password and was lazy getting around to reset. Sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis. You will be in my prayers.

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

Thank you Sandy Ray; it is what keeps me going.   I am not a pessimist or a secularist, despite my academic training and occasional bouts of dispair.

I 'do' lazy -- so I can well relate.

ShadyGuy
Posts: 709
Joined: Jan 2017

Act 5, scene 4 of Shakespeare's play "Richard III"

for my quote

TV show "Mr. Ed" for yours

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

Shady:  the comparison of your quote to mine proves my cultural superiority.    Mr. Ed was one of the brilliant programs of all time, but who ever heard of this 'Shakespeare' dude ?

 Mister Ed.png

ShadyGuy
Posts: 709
Joined: Jan 2017

Max
I loved that show by George Burns. It was genius. Also Mr Ed's cousin Francis was amusing to a small kid like me.
signed,
Wilbur

Addendum: Francis was a talking mule

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

Met with the opthamologist (M.D.) today.   Said no indication of any macular degeneration, of any stage.  He told me the O.D. was probably thrown off by the level of cataract, and how it was distributed, which does obscure the retna in a way that could be taken for m.d.  Should be scheduled for cataract surgery soon, which of course is a pretty safe and routne proceedure.   Thanks to all for the kind intentions,

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 857
Joined: Mar 2013

What a relief! I am so happy for you.

Cheers,

Rocquie

 

ShadyGuy
Posts: 709
Joined: Jan 2017

Wonderful news!

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Sandy Ray
Posts: 130
Joined: May 2017

Glad to hear the good news!

po18guy's picture
po18guy
Posts: 1222
Joined: Nov 2011

Now, pay a little extra for upgraded inter-ocular lenses, make sure they put the correct ones in (ahem!) and you will be singing like Johnny Nash.

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3699
Joined: May 2012

On of my favorite hits back in the 70s.....  I like Jimmy Cliff's remake a little better, it has that Reggae vibe.   En-joy, Monn !  An upbeat turn for all here today.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrHxhQPOO2c

 

PBL
Posts: 329
Joined: Jul 2016

So glad you're feeling "very olympic"! Hope it lasts you more than just today...

As to "seeing clearly", hopefully, that'll be after surgery Cool

PBL
Posts: 329
Joined: Jul 2016

So glad you're feeling "very olympic"! Hope it lasts you more than just today...

As to "seeing clearly", hopefully, that'll be after surgery Cool

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