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ShadyGuy
Posts: 702
Joined: Jan 2017

While reading my latest summary from a major cancer center I came upon a new (to me at least) word. "Pancytopenia caused by chemotherapy". From what I can tell it is a type of anemia in which wbc, rbc and platelets are all low. Has anyone rlse had this diagnosis and if so is it reversible, ie treatable? I will be speaking about it with my doctor. It may help explain my fatigue. Thanks.

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 857
Joined: Mar 2013

I was diagnosed, back in the day, with pancytopenia. The treatment in my case was blood transfusions, which I had numerous times. I haven't had problems in several years. I would think there is a strong chance this is causing fatigue, as well as infections.

Take it easy on yourself!

Hugs,

Rocquie

ShadyGuy
Posts: 702
Joined: Jan 2017

Glad you are over it. Your recovery has been remarkable.  I have to keep moving. I would do so much better if I could just sleep. It seems this is a "condition" and not a disease. It is probably caused by damage to the bone marrow from chemo. Also when origiinally diagnosed 26% of the cells in my marrow were cancerous which means further damage to my marrow's ability to produce healthy blood cells. It is what it is. My sun is setting.

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Rocquie
Posts: 857
Joined: Mar 2013

Rather than use the word "condition", I like to use the word "malady" simply because I like the word and I think it is fun to say. I officially have a "Syndrome". (S.I.A.D.S) which is is another fun word, though not a fun disorder. It is a rare result of lymphoma and the treatment thereof. 

When you said your sun is setting, it made me think of this beautiful song: Don't Let the Sun Go Down. . . (clickable link)

Don't forget to stop and smell the daffodils. Spring has arrived again.

Your friend,

Rocquie

 

 

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3689
Joined: May 2012

One thing about the cancer experience is that it is educational.   Pancytopenia, if you've studied Latin (I have not), would mean exactly what you describe:  pan = 'all'; cyto= 'cancerous', and penia = 'deficiency.'

I am out the door to see the NP.  Had labs last week:  remain anemic myself, after three months on OTC iron, per the Doc.  But the evidence is not straightforward, clouded in a slew of subtest results.  They have not figured it out.   One theory they had a while back was aplastic anemia, a form of leukemia.  But apalastic anemia, in which all stem cell products are low (WBC,RBC, platelets) is almost always aggressive, and usually kills fast.   So it seems to be something else.  In layman's parlance, aplastic anemia is usually refered to as 'bone marrow failure.'

 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25837779/

PBL
Posts: 327
Joined: Jul 2016

Max, there's a material error in your breakdown of "pancytopenia": -cyto- refers to "cell". So, the whole word reads: "deficiency in all cell types" (in the blood sample).

Now, as regards your own concern, I do hope it is not aplastic anemia - but as you note yourself, it's been going on for too long without much evolution, so... A mystery?

Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3689
Joined: May 2012

As used within the oncology world, 'cytotoxic' refers to a drug (mostly chemos) that kills cancerous cells, in that it differentiates hypermetabolic verses non-hypermetabolic ones.   

But you are correct: LITERALLY, cytotoxic would be rendered generically as 'cell killer.'   

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