Depression

I don't know if I'm in the right section to post this. Have you experienced depression post chemo? I'm four months out from my last chemo session and awaiting resection. Diagnosis was stage 3 colon cancer. I've been feeling very low and spend a lot of time in bed. I know I need to get up and exercise, eat right etc but it seems to be a vicious cycle. And, I feel as if I am just waiting for the other shoe to drop (recurrence). I'm not normally so down. I was upbeat all throughout the nearly six months of chemo.

MCB

Comments

  • SnapDragon2
    SnapDragon2 Member Posts: 660 Member
    What is the reason for the

    What is the reason for the long wait to surgery if I can ask?

    For depression, many feel it.  It's perfectly normal.  One or two days in the bed is OK in my opinion then get your arse up and get moving doing something that will help take your mind off cancer.  Just my advice.

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,715 Member
    edited February 2021 #3
    Exercise

    It's normal to feel depressed and some of us worry about the other shoe dropping now and then, but get up and exercise.  Believe it or not, the exercise will do you good and keep your mind off of your depression.  Get outside if you are able right now and take a walk.  If you can't go for a walk outside, you can always circle your residence.  I'll do that during the winter just so that I'm able to get my 250 steps in an hour on my Fitbit.  It might be a good idea for you to get a pedometer too just to calcluate how much activity you are getting a day.  Talk to your doctor too, they might want to put you on something temporarily.  Hope you feel better soon.

    Kim

  • RudiTuesday
    RudiTuesday Member Posts: 15
    MCB, I understand depression

    I was diagnosed with clinical depression and anxiety about 2 years before my stage 3 colon cancer diagnosis. In fact, 6 months before my cancer diagnosis I hit rock bottom emotionally and spent a weekend in the psych ward. I truly believe that if they had done a simple CBC test during that hospitalization they would have discovered that something was wrong physically as well as emotionally. Looking back, my depression went hand in hand with my physical decline prior to my cancer diagnosis. Like you, I was pretty upbeat during chemo, radiation, and surgeries. I was focused and fighting hard. I'm now on the other side of all that treatment. I'm getting scans every 3 months and dealing with lung mets and thyroid issues. I still have days when I don't want to get out of bed. Sometimes I give in and spend the day in bed, other times I force myself to get up and do something to improve my mood. For me that is often taking long walks around the neighborhood, or experimenting with new recipes in the kitchen, or watching sports on tv. Try to find those little things that improve your mood and take your mind off the cancer. I wish I knew how to stop waiting for the other shoe to drop. I feel that anxiety every time I have a doctor appointment or even when I have minor aches and pains. Of course, you should discuss how you are feeling emotionally with your doctor.  In the meantime, you have joined a very knowledgeable and caring group here. Please keep posting, it might make you feel better to know that you are not alone and we are here for you. 

    Rudi

  • OnTheRoad
    OnTheRoad Member Posts: 29
    Depression after chemo

    I  had depression after all the "hurricane" that discovering I had cancer, do surgeries, chemo, etc... was

    My doctor said depression is notmal and it impacts us, pacients, in 2 different ways:

    1) The indirect psicological impact of having the news we got the disease, the anxiety to know if it will progress or not,  etc....

    2) The direct impact of the chemo itself, that creates imbalances in the chemicals of the brain.

    It is not the first time there are questions like yours in this forum.

    It also took me a long while to recover from what you described... to start recovering my energy levels and to return to my normal life. After a year I started to work out again and the more I worked out, I felt better and more energized in the next day.

    I hope you return to normality soon.

     

     

  • yetti
    yetti Member Posts: 82 Member
    edited February 2021 #6
    Depression @dx during chemo, hysterectomy, more chemo

    I also suffered from depression And anxpiety !  I have a different cancer ♋️ Gyn, stage 4B endometrial cancer !  I was Dx June 2018,  I was very angry, in denial. I was refusing treatment. Just wanted to die ! I ended up with pulmonary Embolism July of 2018. Spent a week in the hospital, this is when I think the depression and anxiety began ! I started chemo reluctantly in Aug of 2018. Honestly death would have been easier!  So I fought the cancer became NED April 2019. I had a full laproscopic robotic hysterectomy in Jan 2019. I returned to work in Aug 2020, returning to work, the hardest thing to do, I had lost my hair, so my hair was very short. I was self conscious over my thin short ugly hair. I was depressed but I didn't know I was depressed, so I sought the help of a counselor and a shrink. For Xanax for anxiety and Zoloft for depression !  I feel as though I got better mentally and physically just in time for a pandemic last March! And approaching a year with this pandemic is making me  more anxious and I may need them to increase the Zoloft strength !  

  • sreekanth
    sreekanth Member Posts: 57 Member
    edited August 2021 #7
    Yes, I experienced depression post-chemo

    During chemo, steroids are part of the cocktail and that keeps us energized. Suddenly when it is stopped, we experience withdrawal syndrome . I experienced this...extreme tiredness, clouded mind. It is just my theory that this occurs due to the sudden drop in steroids. No clinical evidence. Perhaps someone will research this and recommend that steroids be gradually faded out instead of putting a sudden break to it. And this may finally become part of standard of care.

    Another reason is that when some therapy is going on, we are actively fighting the disease with the help of medical staff. We meet the radiologist, nurse who helps with IV etc. We feel that they are fighting the fight with us. When the treatment is over, we change from being ACTIVE FIGTHERS to PASSIVE OBSERVERS waiting for the Damocles' sword to fall. That creates anxiety. We feel alone because we are no longer meeting with medical staff. So, this isolation and reverting to passive mode make us depressed. 

    Exercising, talking to other people on a daily basis - will all help. But dont hesitate to seek mental help from trained professionals. Most hospitals that provide cancer care also provide mental health support and counseling

     

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,643 Member
    sreekanth said:

    Yes, I experienced depression post-chemo

    During chemo, steroids are part of the cocktail and that keeps us energized. Suddenly when it is stopped, we experience withdrawal syndrome . I experienced this...extreme tiredness, clouded mind. It is just my theory that this occurs due to the sudden drop in steroids. No clinical evidence. Perhaps someone will research this and recommend that steroids be gradually faded out instead of putting a sudden break to it. And this may finally become part of standard of care.

    Another reason is that when some therapy is going on, we are actively fighting the disease with the help of medical staff. We meet the radiologist, nurse who helps with IV etc. We feel that they are fighting the fight with us. When the treatment is over, we change from being ACTIVE FIGTHERS to PASSIVE OBSERVERS waiting for the Damocles' sword to fall. That creates anxiety. We feel alone because we are no longer meeting with medical staff. So, this isolation and reverting to passive mode make us depressed. 

    Exercising, talking to other people on a daily basis - will all help. But dont hesitate to seek mental help from trained professionals. Most hospitals that provide cancer care also provide mental health support and counseling

     

    Superb reply

    Very well thought out and worded. Thank you, sreekanth. 

    Tru

  • DebSchmal
    DebSchmal Member Posts: 1
    edited August 2021 #9
    Mental health can affect

    Mental health can affect every aspect of your life, including your physical health. Mental illnesses can affect your ability to work, date, or do almost anything else. I had some mental health problems that took me into a deep depression.  Fortunately, there are ways to improve your mental health and learn how to spot future illnesses. The good news is there are proven things you can do to improve your mental well-being without medication. I went to Psychoanalysis Therapy London. The doctor from here taught me how to overcome depression and how to find solutions to my problems.