First chemo Monday

Hi all-

A month after being diagnosed I am having my first infusion chemo session Monday. Does anyone remember how they felt after having the first session? Were you able to drive home afterward?

Thanks-

Kelley

Comments

  • AnneO1965
    AnneO1965 Member Posts: 182
    Hi Kelley,

    Hi Kelley,

    I had Folfox for my chemo, and the first couple of rounds were a snap. Didn't feel any different walking out as I did when I walked it. The side effects of Folfox are cummalative, meaning they build up over time. So your first couple of sessions should be ok, but then you will probably start seeing some side effects.

    That being said, not everyone reacts to chemo the same way, so your experience could be different.

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,262 Member
    When in doubt. . .

    I have a hundred and one sayings, and for this situation I would suggest, "when in doubt, take the conservative route."  It would probably be best to have a driver available.  I think people on this board have had a whole range of reactions, from nothing at all, to needing medical intervention.  I did pretty badly.  I suppose I could have driven myself home, but I had pretty strong nausea and bad reaction to cold.  Luckily I had read some blog posts and was ready for the cold reaction--but silly me, I went to the grocery and decided to get an easy frozen food for dinner.  It was like touching a live electric wire.  Luckily, I threw it into the basket, not across the store like others have done.  In the grocery, the food made me so nauseous that I had to stare at the ceiling and leave quickly to avoid being sick.  Anyway, hopefully you will do much better.  A read through old blog posts will give you a wealth of information.  Best of luck to you.

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,628 Member

    When in doubt. . .

    I have a hundred and one sayings, and for this situation I would suggest, "when in doubt, take the conservative route."  It would probably be best to have a driver available.  I think people on this board have had a whole range of reactions, from nothing at all, to needing medical intervention.  I did pretty badly.  I suppose I could have driven myself home, but I had pretty strong nausea and bad reaction to cold.  Luckily I had read some blog posts and was ready for the cold reaction--but silly me, I went to the grocery and decided to get an easy frozen food for dinner.  It was like touching a live electric wire.  Luckily, I threw it into the basket, not across the store like others have done.  In the grocery, the food made me so nauseous that I had to stare at the ceiling and leave quickly to avoid being sick.  Anyway, hopefully you will do much better.  A read through old blog posts will give you a wealth of information.  Best of luck to you.

    Pregnant

    In the grocery, the food made me so nauseous that I had to stare at the ceiling and leave quickly to avoid being sick. 

    Ph Sandia, this is how I felt when I was pregnant. Grocery shopping was a real chore. 

    Tru

  • annie4145
    annie4145 Member Posts: 218 Member
    My first day at chemo wasn't

    My first day at chemo wasn't so bad.   I drove myself to a hotel across town in San Francsico.  Just remember to take your anti-nausea medicine at the first sign of stomach upset and you will be fine.  (I didn't take it the first night when my stomach started to feel bad, and I went to sleep instead, deciding that I would "sleep it off" like you can do with a a minor stomach ache sometime.  Not a good idea. But if you take your medicine as scheduled, I didn't not find it to be too bad.  I didn't throw up except that first night when I didn't take my medicine. Some people have minimal problems.  

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,628 Member
    edited February 2020 #6
    I remember my first time....

    I remember how apprehenisve I was, sitting in the waiting room. They called me back and I had my port accessed for the first time. So much easier than I had ever imagined. Then I had to sit in the waiting room again. I would watch people go back behind 'The Door'. Then it was my turn. Oh, the trepidation.  

    The only thing that was a little disconcerting was the feeling I had during infusion, of my throat seizing up. Like I could not swallow. I mentioned it to my husband, and a woman in a nearby chair over heard me. She piped up and told me that it was a reaction to the Oxaliplatin part of FOLFOX.  It did not get any worse, and thus I went on with the infusion.  

    So, my advice, be aware of your body and if anything feels different, just run it by one of the chemo nurses. Even if you think its something silly, just mention it and let them put your mind at ease. 

    I had a three hour car trip home after every infusion, so no, I didn't drive.  

    The first infusion will probably go really well. You may find you get tired as each infusion progresses and thus, you would not want to drive. Plus, there are some really gnarly side effects as time progresses, so best try to get someone to go with you. Keep you company as well, as its a three to four hour process. 

    Good luck!  I hope you breeze through your first infusion. 

    Tru

  • th4rs
    th4rs Member Posts: 27 Member
    My first time was Tuesday

    I have the Cape Ox regiment.  I could not use my port due to severe bruising so got it in my arm.  The Oxyliplatin cased tingling in my arm right away.  They watchedn me for awile so the tingling is still present from my wrist to my shoulder.  The Cape part of my regiment is a pill that I take twice a day and it tends to make mee feel a little nausous.  The secound day after chemo was the worst I threw up and got zofran under the tongue and should have probaly got fluids but wated until the next day to get fluids.  The oxyloplatin cases numbness in your hands and a oversensitivity to cold.  They are not kidding if you touch something cold all the nerves seem like they are on fire.  Eating has been the same sweats or sticky stuff casuses a tingling in my mough that is very unpleasant so no sweets for me.  I am hoping that next time will be better due to I know what to expect.  I did call the nurses about 4 times and the on-call Doctor.  DO NOT BE AFRAID TO UTILIZE THEM. That is what they are there for and they do help.  I hope that helps you and good luck.       

     

    Robin

  • th4rs
    th4rs Member Posts: 27 Member
    edited February 2020 #8
    th4rs said:

    My first time was Tuesday

    I have the Cape Ox regiment.  I could not use my port due to severe bruising so got it in my arm.  The Oxyliplatin cased tingling in my arm right away.  They watchedn me for awile so the tingling is still present from my wrist to my shoulder.  The Cape part of my regiment is a pill that I take twice a day and it tends to make mee feel a little nausous.  The secound day after chemo was the worst I threw up and got zofran under the tongue and should have probaly got fluids but wated until the next day to get fluids.  The oxyloplatin cases numbness in your hands and a oversensitivity to cold.  They are not kidding if you touch something cold all the nerves seem like they are on fire.  Eating has been the same sweats or sticky stuff casuses a tingling in my mough that is very unpleasant so no sweets for me.  I am hoping that next time will be better due to I know what to expect.  I did call the nurses about 4 times and the on-call Doctor.  DO NOT BE AFRAID TO UTILIZE THEM. That is what they are there for and they do help.  I hope that helps you and good luck.       

     

    Robin

    Sorry about the type os trying to find the spell check. 

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,715 Member
    edited February 2020 #9
    Mixed

    Although it went without a hitch for me, still for the first round you should have someone with you in case you are not able to drive yourself home.  Everyone reacts different to the treatments, so it's better to err on the side of caution than wing it for the first time.  Wishing you well and hope treatment is tolerable.

    Kim

  • KelleyTX
    KelleyTX Member Posts: 36
    edited February 2020 #10

    Mixed

    Although it went without a hitch for me, still for the first round you should have someone with you in case you are not able to drive yourself home.  Everyone reacts different to the treatments, so it's better to err on the side of caution than wing it for the first time.  Wishing you well and hope treatment is tolerable.

    Kim

    I would like to thank

    I would like to thank everyone for their helpful responses. I decided to have someone drive me. I managed to get through 5 hours of drip bags this morning (plus one to go bag) and basically I am doing okay, although really tired.

     

    Kelley

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,628 Member
    Happy to hear from you

    and that you made it through your very first chemo. 

    Roll with the side effects.

    Push through the fatigue only to a point where you don't completly give up.  I wish I had pushed a bit more at the beginning, and feel it may have benefitted me later in the treatment cycle. 

    I found it helpful - and you may already be doing this - to keep a notebook of your days and how you feel. Talk to your Oncologist about all of your side effects, big and small. 

    Good luck as you  move forward.  Stick with us, and we can help you through. 

    Tru

  • Annabelle41415
    Annabelle41415 Member Posts: 6,715 Member
    Treatment

    Glad to hear you made it through your first round.  Don't be too surprised that you are tired, and make sure to rest when needed, but make sure you get up and move around too.  It's better to try to stay somewhat active and get exercise in, and make sure that you drink plenty of liquids too.  Get a calendar and mark down the days of treatment until you are done.  It makes it easier to see the end when you can mark one treatment off at a time.  Hope tomorrow you find yourself a little better.

    Kim

  • AnneO1965
    AnneO1965 Member Posts: 182
    One down.... Feeling tired is

    One down.... Feeling tired is part of the process, but now you know what to expect. The not knowing drove me crazy.. Well, crazier than normal. Kim has it right about the calendar, it helped me to be able to mark them off, and as they dwindled down I felt a sense of accomplishment. Wish I would of done it for the chemo/radiation part, I felt that was never going to end!

    Keep posting, we will help you through the blahs, because I'm pretty sure everyone has them. When you need to cry, cry... When you need to sleep, sleep. On the days you feel good enough, go do something normal, it will help you retain you.

    We are with you all the way.

  • myAZmountain
    myAZmountain Member Posts: 417 Member
    th4rs said:

    Sorry about the type os trying to find the spell check. 

    th4rs

    I had some port problems with chemo, and developed a DVT of the axillary vein, the site had been very bruised after the insertion --just a heads up --I had pain in armpit area and noticed a bunch of new surface veins that had not been there before --chemo and cancer make some people more prone to clotting. 

  • th4rs
    th4rs Member Posts: 27 Member
    edited February 2020 #15

    th4rs

    I had some port problems with chemo, and developed a DVT of the axillary vein, the site had been very bruised after the insertion --just a heads up --I had pain in armpit area and noticed a bunch of new surface veins that had not been there before --chemo and cancer make some people more prone to clotting. 

    Thank you for the heads up.

    Thank you for the heads up.

     

    Robin 

     

  • Tom M.
    Tom M. Member Posts: 223 Member
    Wishing you the best Kelly.

    Wishing you the best Kelly. Before you know it, it'll all be behind you. Stay positive.

  • Capox Dude
    Capox Dude Member Posts: 84 Member
    Best of luck Kelley

    There is a wide range of response to chemo, so best to prepare for needing help and being pleasently surprised that it was not needed.