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Non-cancer-specific supplement review

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 841
Joined: Apr 2017

As most of you know, I am a believer in supplements.  But just to show I am open-minded, here is a non-cancer-specific look at supplements and health.  It does not deal with the specific issues we face, but nonetheless, it might be interesting: link

There was moderate-certainty evidence that reduced salt intake decreased the risk for all-cause mortality in normotensive participants (risk ratio [RR], 0.90 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.95]) and cardiovascular mortality in hypertensive participants (RR, 0.67 [CI, 0.46 to 0.99]). Low-certainty evidence showed that omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) was associated with reduced risk for myocardial infarction (RR, 0.92 [CI, 0.85 to 0.99]) and coronary heart disease (RR, 0.93 [CI, 0.89 to 0.98]). Folic acid was associated with lower risk for stroke (RR, 0.80 [CI, 0.67 to 0.96]; low certainty), whereas calcium plus vitamin D increased the risk for stroke (RR, 1.17 [CI, 1.05 to 1.30]; moderate certainty). Other nutritional supplements, such as vitamin B6, vitamin A, multivitamins, antioxidants, and iron and dietary interventions, such as reduced fat intake, had no significant effect on mortality or cardiovascular disease outcomes (very low– to moderate-certainty evidence).

Butt's picture
Butt
Posts: 278
Joined: May 2018

What specific supplements do you take? Unrelated question:  How long have you been NED? 

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 841
Joined: Apr 2017

I take an embaressingly long list of supplements.  A non-updated list is on my profile.  I do not have a current list, but hope to get to that one of these days.  I have been NED for 2.5 years.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

That's pretty eye opening that you take lots of supplements and have been NED for so long. I just read on another post that you take Melatonin. I'm going to check into that one. I really upped my vitamin D intake because of you. 

Jan

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 841
Joined: Apr 2017

I just stumbled accross this one last night:   Link Our results constitute the first demonstration of a regulatory role of vitamin D on human colon stem cells, indicating a homeostatic effect on colon epithelium with relevant implications in IBD and CRC.

Sunshine

[N]ew favourable associations between sunlight and disease have been discovered. There is growing observational and experimental evidence that regular exposure to sunlight contributes to the prevention of colon-, breast-, prostate cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple sclerosis, hypertension and diabetes. Initially, these beneficial effects were ascribed to vitamin D. Recently it became evident that immunomodulation, the formation of nitric oxide, melatonin, serotonin, and the effect of (sun)light on circadian clocks, are involved as well.

 Melatonin

[S]everal studies have indicated that melatonin can modulate microtubule and microfilament structure formation, and suppress the invasive and metastatic potential of invasive and metastatic potential of breast (6), colon (8), liver (10) and lung (13) cancer cells via different signaling pathways. . . These results provide evidence for the potential clinical application of melatonin in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancers.

My recollection is that melatonin is absorbed in the digestive system and colon, so that people with a reduced colon may benefit more from melatonin supplementation.

Joan M's picture
Joan M
Posts: 365
Joined: Oct 2016

I have been using more salt latley becuase the chemo dulls my taste buds.  It will be hard to lower the intake.  I am on a few supplements.  I take red krill oil instead of fish oil.  I just can't swallow those huge fish oil pills.  also been drinking tumeric chai tea my daughter gave me - it's really good! and seems to help with inflammation and arthritis pain.

Thanks again for your research Sandia!  

suzycruise76's picture
suzycruise76
Posts: 62
Joined: Mar 2019

could you,please,post exact name and brand/maker of the turmeric chai tea? I know it is important that the maker is a reputable company which puts correct ammount of the medical/healing  ingredientsies instead of cheap fillers.

Thank you very much,

Suzy

Joan M's picture
Joan M
Posts: 365
Joined: Oct 2016

Sorry for the delayed response.  It is a honey chai tumeric tea and actually tastes good. I couldnt drink it if it didn't.  

I don't think it's sold as any type of supplement, but tumeric is known to reduce inflammation.

 

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 841
Joined: Apr 2017

I don't avoid salt.  I mean, it is one of the electrolytes, isn't it?  And people with colectomies often need extra electrolytes.  I think that anything that keeps you eating while on chemo is likely a good thing.  My recollection is that there is abundant research that says turmeric helps make chemo more effective, but since I am off chemo, I am not following that issue.  The study on this post is for the general population, not people with cancer, so I would not put too much stock in it.  I only posted it as an alternative viewpoint to mine that supplements are helpful.

Qunol
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 2019

If anyone is considering turmeric, check with your doctor first. And, there are challenges absorbing turmeric. For example, forms that are hydro-soluble absorb better.

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6121
Joined: Feb 2009

Salt is my weakness, however my level was below normal (just barely) on last test so maybe my body needs extra.  I'm not an iodized salt person though, but will use Sea Salt or the Morton Lite Salt.

Kim

lhduffer
Posts: 66
Joined: Oct 2015

I only take 1000 iu of D3 and my doctor told me not to take more than that based on my blood levels.  I guess living in Florida and golfing in the sun keeps my levels up.  I am interested in the melatonin though.  Thanks for all of the interesting articles.

colon3b_
Posts: 4
Joined: Jun 2019

I’ve had many discussions on nutrition with my oncologist.  Eating tree nuts is good for cancer (almond, pecan, walnut, ...).  The only supplements he recommended were vitamin D3 (50 mcg) and B12 (1000 mcg).  B12 helps with recovery during chemo with RBCs.  In addition low dose aspirin helps during chemo.

Always check with your doctor before taking supplements.

nuc
Posts: 22
Joined: Jun 2019

Interesting meta-analysis on Aspirin, for anyone interested on its effects re:colon cancer.

https://www.wjgnet.com/2150-5349/full/v5/i1/40.htm#B26

 

Adam

feckcancer
Posts: 76
Joined: Jun 2018

my friend who is a doctor told me that tumeric is most effective if it is heated .( i forget the scientific reason ). another friend drinks hers in hot water.

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 841
Joined: Apr 2017

Agreed.  I recall reading more than one study where turmeric used in cooking was the most effective.  I have tried it in cooking, and honestly, I do not find it all that appetizing.  Occassionally, I add it to a stir-fry, but I make do with the pill with turmeric and black pepper.  I suppose it is simply more convenient for me.

Qunol
Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 2019

Here is one research study on bioavailability of turmeric showing it is better in a supplement form: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28204880

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