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Vitamin D & Omega 3 in CRC

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 840
Joined: Apr 2017

Here is a very small study that found Vitamin D and Omega 3 fatty acid (such as found in fish) supplementation can be helpful for those with colorectal cancer (abstract only):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31106659

[P]atients who received combined vitamin D3 and omega-3 fatty acids supplements compared with omega-3, vitamin D3, and placebo groups had significantly decreased CRP and TNF-α. In addition, serum level of IL-6 was decreased significantly in omega-3, vitamin D3, and cosupplementation groups compared with baseline. Regarding nutritional status, weight, BMI, and FFM% were increased significantly in vitamin D3, omega-3, and cosupplementation groups at the end of the intervention. Vitamin D3 plus omega-3 fatty acids cosupplementation in colorectal cancer patients has beneficial impacts on inflammation and nutritional status.

myAZmountain's picture
myAZmountain
Posts: 241
Joined: Apr 2018

Have been taking both of these--appreciate the post!

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

50,000 IU of vitamin D weekly! I need to step up my dose! Thanks for sharing this. Sometimes I wonder about supplements and for the most part I haven't seen anything that makes me want to try it. But there are a couple of things I do like taking vitamin D and while my cancer will likely never be gone, the fact is that at this point it's slow growing and not aggressive. They've extended my life expectancy because of how slow growing it is. Maybe something that I'm doing right is having an effect. Maybe some things do work and are able to help. I feel like if a supplement doesn't get rid of my cancer then it doesn't work but maybe this is enough.

Jan

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 840
Joined: Apr 2017

For me, it comes down to a risk benefit analysis.  I find very little risk (as long as I monitor my D levels) in natural D (sun) and supplementation, and a possible big benefit.  

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

I agree, vitamin D is cheap and can't hurt us. Some of the other supplements they suggest are expensive and unpleasant to take. Despite the fact that I have to be really careful I eat more fruit and veggies than I did before diagnosis. That may help, too, no idea. But I've been stuck in this idea that no supplement will take the cancer away and I'm now thinking that I've been looking at it the wrong way. If it can just keep it at bay along with traditonal treatment then I'm doing okay. An epiphany!

Jan

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 840
Joined: Apr 2017

Sometimes chemo only buys people two more months.  What if you could buy the same two months via more natural methods without the side effects?  That question goes largely unanswered because there are virtually no studies where chemo is not used.  For me, I like to feel that I am doing something.  Maybe the supplements really do not help, but at least I feel like I am doing something.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

The problem is how do they judge that? If a person lasts longer than anticipated is it because of the chemo or what caused it? It's impossible to say. I appreciate that taking soemthing makes you feel a little moe in control and like you're doing something to help. Maybe it's doing nothing or maybe it's making a huge difference, how can we tell? 

We have friends that swear that every time someone gets a horse put under for a treatment or something it shortens it's life by, I can't remember, a month? A year? It's something that I don't see how anyone could quantify. A horse dies at a certain age and someone goes "he'd have lasted another year if he hadn't had to be sedated a few times". Or the old belief that if a person whistles while walking past a graveyard no ghosts will get them. No ghosts so it must work. The year I was doing well and thought I'd beaten it I ate a lot of Love Heart candies. Yes, my secret shame... Anyway, I used to joke that I was cured by eating Love Hearts. Or broccoli soup. I had a real Jones for that the same year. Maybe the broccoli did it.

It came back and it was mets after that but my point is that I hear so many people tell me about someone they know who did this or that or ate this or that and they don't have cancer anymore. If they were going to get rid of it who's to say how it happened. Was it just the treatment they were on? Was it that plus something minor they ate or did? How can we know?

Sorry, Buddy, not trying to be challenging, it just frustrates me. If there was a supplement or something that showed real promise I'd be all over it. The only one that I've heard that seems to have some postitive effect is vitamin D. Or maybe if I could afford it I'd try some of the ideas people send me. Maybe in conjunction with chemo it really would help. But with varrying responses and difference between people and the variety of cancers within the colon cancer group there's no way to know. 

Not to mention how some things become the cure of the year and later are discarded. Coconut oil, now it's turmeric. Which many people don't realize must be taken with- is it black pepper?- to receive any benefits. When I see something on Facebook about something like dandelions and it says it cures everything from arthritis to cancer and everything in between I immediately think 'right'. I'm so sick of hearing people say that CBD will cure it. It helps with symptoms but does it cure it? No. My sister sent me something that's supposed to kill 17,000 cancer cells a day. It's supposed to grow at a rate of a million cells a day so it's way behind. I think it was frankensence.

Like I said, I'm not trying to be combative. I just wish there was something could definitively show did something to help. I'd love to get some sort of supplement and actually feel like I'm really helping myself.

Jan 

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6116
Joined: Feb 2009

He tried everything - from coffee enemas to supplements, chemo, and things and procedures I've never heard of and he still passed.  I'm not sure if supplements help either.  Everytime there is a St. Jude commercial on I'm thinking that little child never ate steak daily, breathed enough pollutants or didn't eat enough vegetables.  It just doesn't make sense.  There are people that will take any supplement because someone says it's good for them.  I'm not just going to wonder all the time.  I'll eat right and take a couple supplements but then the rest I'm just not sure about.

Kim

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4756
Joined: Jan 2013

I actually work part time in a supplement shop.  I don't take supplements, so I think its rather ironic. 

So many people ask me 'How come you're surviving Cancer? What are you taking?'  Well, I'm not taking anything and I eat what I want, when I want. 

I have really good skin. I have had many comments on how good my skin is. 'What do you use on your skin?' Well, I use nothing. I don't wear make up and I drink allot of water. People don't want to hear that. They want to hear that I take so and so supplements, or use buckets of expenisve creams. 

For me personally, I prefer to get what I can directly from nature.  But thats just me, it doesn't make it right for everyone. 

As for vitamin D, I'm outside so much, I figure I must be getting enough. I won't bother getting it checked, because chances are I wouldn't take a supplement if I knew I was deficient.

Saying all of that, I did meet a patient once, who takes 80 supplements a day. EIGHTY! He was in his 80's and looked like he was in his 60's, so something is working for him.

It is a personal choice.

I also appreciate your threads and links, Sandia. Knowledge is knowledge, regardless of wether you implement it in your life or not.  

I also love how you don't get upset when people disagree. My oh my, how we used to see the forum flare up, when I first arrived here. So many strong minded folks, all passed on now.

Tru 

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 840
Joined: Apr 2017

I love to find unambiguous answers, but it seems in the field of colon cancer, there are none.  I have learned to never suggest that anyone else follow any specific course, all I can talk about is what I do and what choices I have made.  Some people are interested in supplements and natural methods, some are not.  That is fine by me.  If I have learned one thing from this disease it is to focus on myself and be non-judgmental.  I will continue to post things that I come accross that I find interesting.  Most of the more acrane avenues I do not post--things like Fisetin and Luteolin, however, if I ever find a lot of extra time, I might.  Anyway, let's all live and let live.  If you do not like the information I post, just skip reading the post.Wink

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4756
Joined: Jan 2013

I moved this thread to go under Jan's & Kim's replies, as it fits better there. 

jeffkatz
Posts: 6
Joined: Jul 2019

Thank you for infos!

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