CSN Login
Members Online: 9

You are here

Adjuvant Chemo Therapy

airborne72's picture
airborne72
Posts: 278
Joined: Sep 2012

Everyone:

I decided to extract this topic from another large thread (118+ comments) to make it easier to access.  There is nothing special about my adjuvant chemo therapy.  The main reason I am semi documenting it is because there are a few others on the list who will begin theirs in the near future and my comments may help them in their journey.

In that other thread I described the first day of my first adjuvant chemo therapy session, which was a Wednesday.  One day was hardly sufficient time to experience the typical "up down all around" sensations enduced by chemo so I promised to post another comment a few days after my 48 hour infusion cycle was complete.  That time has past so here I am with a few days of experience.  Hopefully, my comments will help others through this challenge.

My regimen includes 6 two-week cycles of FOLFOX6.  The first day includes 3-4 hours of infusion of steroids and anti nausea meds plus the oxaliplatih and leuvovorin calcium.  Then I am equipped with the pump in a fanny pack with a bag of fluorouracil for infusion during the next 44 +/- hours.  After the total 48 hours of infusion I am then disconnected from the pump and fanny pack; my port is sanitized and covered and I am free to leave the clinic and act normal for the next 12 days.  An important comment that the nurse made as I was leaving stuck with me.  She said that the nausea usually affected people soon after the pump was disconnected.  Truer words were never spoken.  I'll get to that in a few sentences.

The only issues that I encountered during my first infusion was fear of the unknown.  I had minimal physical discomfort; instead I had signficant visual discomfort, looking at all the others who are battling the same insidious disease.  Looking at their faces and seeing determination, fatigue, despair, and hope.  Some tough and brave individuals led by example and maintained a positive, can-do attitude through it all.  The measure of a person's courage is determined during a crisis, and I was priviledged to be in the company of some courageous souls in that clinic.  Their silent fortitude became my standard as well. There is strength in numbers.  Infusion clinics are an excellent example.

Within minutes of the infusion I noticed "that" taste in my mouth and the cold sensitivity in my fingers and mouth.  That sensation remained with me for six days, and has now virtually disappeared.  So far I have not had any symptoms of neuropathy, and that is my greatest concern.

Now back to the comment that the nurse made as I was leaving on Friday afternoon.  I aggravated the outcome by eating too much food too late on Friday evening.  My penance was a night of nausea, and trips to the bathroom to urinate and empty my bag every two hours.  Early Saturday morning my energy level dropped and remained at that level until mid day today (Monday).  I realize that it was not the best thing to do, but I spent the majority of yesterday in bed.  My appetite fell off and so did my weight.  Since last Wednesday when we hooked up the intial infusion I have lost four pounds.  I now weigh 134.

My oncologist blessed me with several different prescriptions for nausea so I tried the prochlorperazine and it helped.  I am also taking miranol (synthetic THC) to stimulate my appetite.  It is not doing so well against this chemo nausea.

Based upon my limited amount of experience, it appears to me that getting through this adjuvant chemo therapy will require attention to detail, routine/habitual behavior, remaining proactive in all areas and staying mentally positive.  I am trying my best to do so.

Jim

 

 

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Thanks for the post.

I wake up every three to four hours at night to empty the bag whether or not it really needs it just for peace of mind.

I have the same problem with eating too much before going to bed. If I do this, my rest is less peaceful and I get up more freqently to empty the bag. Last night I said no to additional food from my wife even though I would have enjoyed more. And I feel much better for it this morning. I don't have any problems maintaining weight. I actually have the problem of trying to not gain and I would like to lose about four pounds in the next couple of weeks. I don't feel like I'm eating that much but I must be if I have to work at not gaining it.

I think that the attention to detail, routine, and behavior is required throughout the whole process. I think that you know that I'm a process guy and set up metrics and electronic reminders for everything (it's the neurotic part of me). I don't think that this would be particularly difficult for you either as you think about the process and how to improve it and that's the main part of getting better at this stuff.

One other thing, how are you doing physically? Is it easier to get out of bed or maybe you're getting out of bed as before surgery? How about driving, walking, or even raking? One of the funny things that I worry about in the office is opening fire doors. We have fire doors everywhere. Pushing them is no problem, what is sometimes a worry is pulling one open as they are quite heavy.

airborne72's picture
airborne72
Posts: 278
Joined: Sep 2012

Mike - and everyone else:

My mobility is good.  I have been driving since four days after discharge.  Not long or fast - just in town stuff.  The greater challenge is getting in and out of the vehicle.

I have cautioned myself about gut exertions, as you described with the fire doors.  It is so easy to forget and then do somthing risky.  I may be somewhat protected from a hernia because I already have been repaired for a bilateral inguinal hernia.  They inserted a sheet of plastic mesh inside my gut to fortify my body cavity.  That mesh may be providing me some additional, and most welcomed, protection.

My out-and-about has been drastically curtailed by this chemo.  I am housebound until I regain some strength.  Plus, I do not want to catch any viruses.

Input vs. output.  I experienced my first bag failure last night.  I awoke to a weird sensation and immediately knew what it was.  I looked under the wet spot on my t shirt and I had a pile of effluent puddled in my navel.  What a mess!!  Cleaning up and applying a new wafer was not easy since my stoma was super active at 4 a.m.  Go figure.  Last night I ate supper earlier than ever (6:30) and I ate less.  It's just karma.  The most important thing I learned from the experience is to ALWAYS have a wafer precut and ready to go.  That menial and tactile challenging task of cutting that hole is doubly frustrating at 4 a.m. when you are by yourself and your stoma is on high output.  I wanted to scream.  Instead, I focused on damage control by minimizing the spread of the effluent. This is so humbling, and irritating.  I am all thumbs when it comes to changing the wafer.

One additional comment.  I remembered this from one of your earlier posts regarding the stoma paste and how sticky it is and how difficult it is to get off your fingers.  Use a cotton swab (the ones on cardboard sticks used to clean out ears) to spread it.  Works like a charm.

One additional question/request.  There are hundreds of years of experience on this forum.  If anyone has developed successful techniques for changing ostomy wafers then please share.  For example, is it better to apply the paste to the wafer or to your stomach?  Other than eating mashmellows, is there a proven method of reducing stoma flow to aid in the change of wafers?  What has been the ideal frequency for changing your wafer?  How do you address the issue of skin irritation around your stoma?  And lastly, my stoma has become an introvert (currently flush with the skin at best) and this changes the dynamics of the paste barrier.  Ideas?

Jim (a frustrated, sleep-deprived ostomate in Tennessee)

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Yes, I know that feeling. It woke me up in a hurry and I'm glad my wife got me a towel quickly or it would have been on the bed. I do need to toss the towel though. I think that my Ostomy Nurse did a really good job with teaching me the process. I ran into the shower with the towel holding the stuff coming out and my kids helped me out. They brought a wooden stool which I use for bag changes (it's a nice height and it just holds the stuff that I need at the time. My daughter filled up a small container of water when something came out and I just washed it off though I had to do it many times (which is why the process took an hour). I would not have been able to do the tracing from the shower. I did the cutting, applied the paste and used the barrier wipes. The barrier wipes are the thing that's really sticky, not the paste for me. I never tough the paste. Here's the current revision of my directions:

Changing stoma and wafer
Supplies:

1 Wafer
1 Stoma Bag
1 Tube Paste
6 Packets of barrier wipes
1 Disposable Glove
Scissors
Template
Clear flexible bandage for wound
Bandaids
4 Face Cloths
Toilet Paper
Empty wastebasket
2 Small Trash Bags

Step 1: Remove Old Bag and Wafer and Clean Area
- Peel off the old wafer.
- Clean with facecloth.
- Peel off old paste (stool may come out while cleaning). May need to rub with dry towel to get paste off.
- Use wet towel to go around stoma; it may take a few passes.

Step 2: Prepare Tracings with Template
- Open Wafer Package.
- Check template alignment and sizing.
- Place template face up (ink facing me) on wafer, open in package. Template has top labeled.
- Trace with a pen into the backing.
- Cut with trace facing me.
- Draw a T at the top.

Step 3: Prepare the Stoma Wafer and Bag
- Attach the bag to the wafer and press the ring firmly.
- Close the bag outlet with Velcro.
- Peel off the wafer paper.
- Apply thin layer of paste from the perpendicular tube around the ring.
- Flatten with tube tip.

Step 4: Clean skin around stoma and create skin barrier
- Use barrier wipes to clean the skin around the stoma and create a skin barrier.

Step 5: Install the stoma
- Before removing the backing, put on the stoma.
- Hold it down for at least two minutes for the paste to warm up and attach well to the skin.
- Remove the backing while pressing against the skin.
- Press all the way around to ensure a good seal.

airborne72's picture
airborne72
Posts: 278
Joined: Sep 2012

Mike:

I just read in detail your bag change out procedures and wanted to offer two suggestions based upon my experience.

To minimize the risk of effluent draining while my stoma is uncovered, I perform as many functions as possible prior to removing my system.  For example, I size and cut my wafer first.  I don't need to have access to my stoma to do this.  It is merely a transfer image from the previous wafer protective sheet, as you described.

Another item to consider is mentioned in step 3.  As this reads, you are attaching the bag to the wafer prior to placing the wafer over your stoma and onto your skin.  It is so much easier to put the wafer over the stoma and then press it to ensure it sticks without the bag attached.  Since it only takes a few seconds to subsequently snap the bag onto the wafer, the chance of having a leak is minimal.

Jim

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Hello Jim,

I actually did the first part on the last change. I should update my instructions to reflect that. It does make it easier separating them out.

On the second: the WOC and the nurse that did the change on the last day both attached the bag to the wafer before installation so those are the directions that I have. I believe the reason for doing it this way has to do with the particular bag and wafer. It takes a moderate amount of effort and pressure to attach the two and this may have to do with the brand and style of bag/wafer that they chose for me.

thanks,

mike

lhduffer
Posts: 86
Joined: Oct 2015

I still remember my first middle of the night leak.  It was definitely a humbling and mentally trying situation.  "Active Alice" was on a tear with nonstop discharge which made it a 2 1/2 hour bag change with an added meltdown.

I never found anything to slow "Alice" down during an unscheduled change.  The best way I found to clean up in a situation like this was to hop in the shower.  I would then proceed to attempt to accomplish the change as quickly as possible and as good as possible with the constant output.  I learned it could not be "perfect" at a time like that.

As for applying the paste, I never used paste.  I typically changed my wafer every 4th day as a scheduled change.  During a scheduled change, I would change it first thing in the morning before anything to eat or drink.  The skin irritation around the stoma, or excoriation as in my case. became a big problem and can cause the bag to not adhere as well.  My stoma also became flush with what I called an eyebrow.  Due to the change in my stoma, I used a convex wafer.  I also used a modable ring around the stoma prior to adhering the bag.  This worked well for me and helped heal my excoriated skin. I also used barrier strips around the outside of the wafer.

A trick that my home health nurse used was a blow dryer.  I would use it to thoroughly dry the barrier wipe on my skin.  I would then heat the moldable ring after applying to my skin, being careful not to use to much heat on the stoma.  I would also then heat the wafer after appling it to my skin.  I would then apply my barrier strips and heat them with the blow dryer too.   My WOCN from the hospital also had given me a pack of the body cleansing cloths they use in the hospital and had me heat it for 20-30 seconds in the microwave and I would then hold that over the wafer area of the bag while lying down to try and assure a good secure adhesion.  

This worked for me but not everyone needs to go to that much prep.  It's all about finding the right system and what will work for you.  Best of luck.

 

Nazareth
Posts: 88
Joined: Nov 2017

Hey- Try adding fiber to your system- I have an illiostomy, and it owudl seem coutner intuitive to add fiber, metamucil, but it helps to bulk up the watery output for me some (although during chemo and radiation, I got diahrea badly and the fiber could only do just so much- i ended yup dehydrated and in hospital)- I don't use pastes for my pouch- I use hollister medical adhesive, and have pretty good luck with that, but it only lasts about 24 hours when I've got the D- 48 when I don't- but that is pushing it for me- You sould also try loperamide- but I don't have any luck with those- Some folsk do though - there is also perscription lomotil- suppsoed to help bulk up the effluent- but doesn't work for me when taking chemo.

A Flush stoma is hard to deal with- You could try Ekins seals under your wafer- but I don't have much luck with htose- many folks swear by them htough-  As for your skin irritation- you will have to change a littlem ore frequently for a little while- till the skin heals- some folks have goodl uck with using milk of magnesia on the irritated part- let dry- dab skin dry right before applying pouch- that is very important- The Hollister medical adhesive gives me enough stikiness that the pouch will remain leak free for abotu 1 day- I apply it to skin, let that dry- then apply it to pouch sseal so both contact areas have the adhesive- only takes about 3 small sprays on both, and I spread it aroudn with finger till it gets tacky-

Good luck- it takes a lot of trial and error to find what works for you- I never had luck with marshmallows- when not on chemo fiber works really well- withotu hte fiber- my output is like water- with it it gets formed almost- and much easier to handle and helps prevent liquid workign it's way under the seal

Also, another tip- take peptol bismol for odors- it bonds with hte odor molecules for most foods and neutralizes them

ReeRee2's picture
ReeRee2
Posts: 39
Joined: Oct 2017

So I have completed two of my 12 rounds of therapy I am blessed I do not have a bag. 

My first round was the unknown. Everything went good but no one told me about numbing cream for my port. So wish that was just a prescription  they just gave out on your first visit to the doctor to be ready. The treatment went good but the side effect of handling or drinking cold set in Immediately. I left with my 46 hour bag wearing it in an elastic thing around me with two pockets one for the bag of fluorouracil. I tried the fanny pack and a cross body small purse but the waistband thing worked the best to not be seen under my clothes and the most comfortable. 

For the 46 hours of the treatment I had to wear gloves to get anything from the fridge or freezer. It hurt to wash my hand with cold water. I had to suck it up or turn the hot water on when I walked into the bathroom so I would have warm water to wash my hands. When I went back to be disconnected I was dehydrated so they gave me a bag of fluids.i felt so much better. I came home and slept for the  next two days. I was very fatigued until the 7th day after.

i am giving myself B12 shots in between treatments. I am also now taking CBD oil. 

My second treatment the effects were a little different. I felt mor fatigued and spent two days after the disconn in bed and the other days working from the couch. I was not dehydrated the second time and I can thank essentia water for that. (Cheapest way to buy is with Amazon.) 

After 8 days I felt like myself again. Being fatigued is so hard because my mind wants to accomplish so much but my body says stop. 

I hope this information helps someone else. 

 

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

You can get B12 orally? I only have 7 more daily shots of blood thinner to go and, believe me, I'm counting down the days. Do you do one shot in-between treatments or multiples?

ReeRee2's picture
ReeRee2
Posts: 39
Joined: Oct 2017

Normally one shot but this time it will be two because my Chemo was pushed from Friday to Monday with the holiday.

 

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov 2001

   When I had chemo it was a big bag of 5fu. I used to turn up at the chemo clinic every tuesday morning. He would ask me how I was doing and give me the pinch test to see how well hydrated I was . Then we would do a weigh in . The 5fu was graduated as per the patients weight. Mine always looked like one of those solar camping showers. More often than not I would receive half a bag of saline before I started the 5fu and the rest of the saline bag was used to flush all of the 5fu thru the lines. It took  most of the morning to receive the full chemo dose. I worked every day of the week except chemo day and most week ends . Every second tuesday I got to take home 9 tablets of levamisole , three a day for three days after the chemo. it was dreadful stuff. It caused a strong metallic taste and also taste reversal. During the wole of chemo I refused to eat foods and dishes I realy liked as the levamisole left bad memories of what was eaten . The blander the food the better. In the early 2000''s levamisole was banned for often fatal side effects. I went thru that for 48 tuesdays . My oncologist offered to give the last eight weeks a miss. I was not travelling that well and the constant strain of chemo and work was causing me a lot of stress. I had asked how my blood counts were going and he said mate the chemo has not dropped one of your counts in all the time you have been on it. I decided to see the treatment thru to the end. I was stage three c into six nodes at diagnosis. My surgeon was a very experienced cancer doctor and he never sugar coated anything. He said my cancer was as aggressive as any he had ever seen and he stated it will get you. You have three years max, if there is something you really want to do , do it now because you may not be able to do it in eighteen months time. I told him straight out that I don't die of cancer. He just looked at me and I said I just know. He laughed and said I hope you are right. I was 48 when he operated on me and I have lived nearly a third of my life as a cancer survivor. I am 67 now and on 22 jan 2018 I will reach the end of year twenty of survival.   Survival has not been easy and I carry a lot of baggae particularly from levamisole but as they say in the classics there are no free lunches there will always be a price to pay. I have learned to live with that. Good health to all. Ron.

Woodytele
Posts: 163
Joined: Apr 2017

i too was losing weight when getting chemo every two weeks.  I suggested medical marijuana to my Onc, and he agreed it may be a good idea.  I got some CBD oil, and some medical marijuana to smoke.  I think it helped greatly and got me off all prescription drugs.  It helps with the nausea and stimulates appetite, helps with sleep too.  If you live in a state that allows it, you may benefit.  I gained all my weight back. 

BRHMichigan's picture
BRHMichigan
Posts: 368
Joined: Jul 2017

Thank you for posting your experiences.  I am terrified of this chemo.  I still have some neuropathy in my toes from Xeloda I took in July and August.  My Onc called me last night to reiterate how important it was that I get started soon.  My last CT was mid September so I will get another CT in December and most likely begin a similar regimen.  Only 6 treatments, 12 weeks, and hopefully able to get surgery on liver and peritoneum mets.  

I am concerned about finances.  Can take 6 months of short term disability if needed with 80% pay.  Probably more sane to do that than to try to work.  I just got back to work last week and it's proving to be extremely stressful, not feeling back to normal at all sadly.

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

You have either a very generous company or state regulations on STD. I'm allowed 3 months STD and then it's LTD. LTD is either 50% or 66% salary with no benefits so it's something that I wanted to avoid. Anyother cancer patient here is out on 3 months STD for the same reason. The first time he was out he went over the limit and basically had to cover the COBRA payments himself. He wasn't expecting to have to deal with that stuff.

I may have to adjust my work schedule if I'm getting infusings. I'm not sure if that means working four days a week on infustion days or working more hours on other days. You've been through two toughies so far and this is just another one of them.

Ruthmomto4's picture
Ruthmomto4
Posts: 659
Joined: May 2013

dont be afraid, my husband was afraid of it as well but honestly he is doing very well. The problems with reactions to cold is annoying him, but it's not a huge problem. He has not missed a day of work and works about 20 extra hours a week. He said he doesn't feel very tired and I haven't noticed it, and never gets any nausea at all. The only problem he had was with irinotecan and once they took that out it's been smooth sailing. Other than the bottle hooked to him, you wouldn't even know he was getting chemo. His disconnect was Saturday and Monday he went to the mall with me. He only took this week off because he couldn't get extra time in so he figured why bother. You can do this! Start it so you can be done 

BRHMichigan's picture
BRHMichigan
Posts: 368
Joined: Jul 2017

I can take 6 months STD at 80% pay.  I took 4 months.  I returned to work and if I stay at least 30 calendar days I can start a brand new STD for up to 6 months.  LTD kicks in at only 60% of my pay.  I am trying to be very careful with all if this.  My job is research and the team is being very accommodating.  But I feel like dead weight.  Ugh.  I hope next week is better.  

Ruth, thank you for the encouragement.  Once again, it seems the most active patients fare the best with chemo.  It's scary to read about those with extreme fatigue and neuropathy, or losing teeth....Only 6 treatments though.  I sure hope my scan comes out okay.

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 5193
Joined: Jan 2013

Could they not come up with another acromym? When I was growing up, STD was sexually transmited disease.  HA! 

OK, I found it amusing. 

Tru

Ruthmomto4's picture
Ruthmomto4
Posts: 659
Joined: May 2013

it took me a little to figure what they were talking about!! Lol 

BRHMichigan's picture
BRHMichigan
Posts: 368
Joined: Jul 2017

You guys!!!!  LOL. 

Right now it could stand for Stress ToDay.  I am really trying to calm down juggling all thus and family and financial stuff.  Some days are so rough emotionally.

Ruthmomto4's picture
Ruthmomto4
Posts: 659
Joined: May 2013

Financial stress is horrible, I hate it! Hopefully family stress will take it easy on you. try and de stress as much as possible, it's not good for you! tomorrow is Thanksgiving being a vegetarian it's my least favorite holiday. Enjoy and relax! :)

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6528
Joined: Feb 2009

It's also called "mop up chemo" and can be used for helping surgery and/or previous rad/chemo, etc.  You will find that it can rack havoc on your immune system and become cummulative where it might be good this week but next time the effect lasts longer and become worse.  Make sure that you communicate to your doctor how each treatment is as this can determine if they can reduce the dose.  My doctor wouldn't do it and now I've got permanent neuropathy.  It's hard to sometimes take a positive view of things when you see others not faring so well.  My facility provided me with a private room on some occasions which was preferred.  Being disconnected was when I'd feel the crash and you will too.  When you are on steroids you can be up for days and have a hard time sleeping.  Just make sure you let your doctor know about all your symptoms.  Wishing you well and keep us informed.

Kim

darcher's picture
darcher
Posts: 257
Joined: Jun 2017

  Seems most everyone is getting or had an intravenous version of mop up chemo.  For what ever reason they're having me on xeloda pills again in a few weeks.  I guess it's more convenient but I still remember the side affects from before and that was for a much shorter time period. This could be for up to 6 months and at higher doses versus the month and half I had it before. I'm a little worried because I know how I got before and this is going to be longer and stronger.   

  I do think outside stresses are a major negative contributor to our condition while on it.  Even now, 2 months after the initial treatment it still impacts me to some degree although the manifestation isn't as bad as it was before.  Perhaps a lot of it is the sudden abrupt changes to our lives. I ended up with radiation burns. I hope it will fade over time. Too many bathroom trips still plague me.  There are others as well and this either caused them or puts a damper on being able to do anything about it. Ultimately, even if survived cancer takes a heavy toll. 

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Thanks for the information on the upcoming treatments. I find out my mop up this Thursday when I meet with the Dana Farber Oncologist and the type of treatment will determine where and how I have it done. The mop up Xeloda is higher dosage but do you get weeks on and off? Would that compensate for the higher dosage?

I'm resigned to going to the bathroom every three hours or so in the middle of the night. Yesterday I ate more than normal though less than usual for Thanksgiving (I didn't eat any turkey as basically anything other than ground or minced meat passes through). I slept quite soundly as well as I was tired but I have my watch alarm set for 4:30 AM so I woke up, found the bag about 40% full and emptied it out. I'm considering setting an additional alarm at 1:00 AM. I normally just wake up at those times without the alarm - the problem is if I'm really tired and sleeping soundly and don't get up. So it's just something that I've learned to live with. I think that this bugs Jim too but what do you do outside of getting a huge and sturdy bag (do they make those)?

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 5193
Joined: Jan 2013

night time bags just like they make night time diapers. 

That would makes sense, don't you think? 

All of your information is extremely helpful to those who are set to get a colostomy or iliostomy. And the info makes those of us who skipped that bullet, very grateful. 

Tru

darcher's picture
darcher
Posts: 257
Joined: Jun 2017

It's three weeks on and one full week off.  Before it was monday-friday with the weekend off.  I remember those and how cruddy I felt by the time Saturday rolled around.  It was cumilitive in that each Friday I felt a little more run down than the one before. This will be worse since the vacation doesn't roll around until much later. The dosage is going to be around 4000 mg a day versus the 3000 before.  Like TruBrit I dodged the bag bullet only to step in front of a couple others.  Beyond being baren my gas which is very frequent now is beyond horrible even to me. I can only hope that settles down. I can't go anywhere since it happens on an almost every 30 minute basis. It's almost funny having to worry about things like that which prevent any social interaction.

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Maybe 5FU is a better solution? It's two days and then off until two weeks are up? The convenience of Xeloda is hard to beat but it does sound more strenuous. For me, the bag limits my activity considerably so I may be okay with Xeloda. Maybe others that went with Xeloda can chime in or we can start a new topic.

The bag is quite limiting but it may be that the surgery and the bag combined are what makes it tough. I'm putting away a bunch of my summer clothes and I have M and L shorts and am putting away all of the M shorts and keeping the L shorts as I need the extra space to accomadate the bag. The shorts are lined so that they provide support for the bag when I'm walking around. I'm not sure how you lost the ability to have kids (whether surgery, radiation, or muscular) but I couldn't tell you myself whether or not I could have kids as I did have the radiation and my muscles down there aren't in any kind of condition to find out. The surgeon talked about reversal for the end of January and I hope that it doesn't take that long for everything to heal up.

Perhaps diet could help with the gas issue. It would be good if you could ask others on the forum to see if they had this and found a solution.

lizard44's picture
lizard44
Posts: 409
Joined: Apr 2015

That's not a problem for me, since I have a colostomy, but I can see  where having to empty several times a night would be a real aggravation.They do make night time pouching systems, though! I remembered seeing some when I was going through my ostomy supply catalog.  Here's a link to one- with a  2 litre capacity.  https://www.coloplast.us/coloplast-urostomy-night-bag-en-us.aspx

Grace/lizard44

Tunadog's picture
Tunadog
Posts: 235
Joined: Mar 2017

Two liters...

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Yeah, kind of like a catheter system. The thing is that the tubing implies that your output is fairly liquidy.

darcher's picture
darcher
Posts: 257
Joined: Jun 2017

Oh brother.  Someone else trying to take advantage of people in a desperate spot.   It's dried and grinded up deer placenta he's pitching.   https://www.sgstemcell.com/blog/purtier-placenta-is-another-scam/    It's being pitched as something like stem cells which, without saying so, is meant to imply it will create new growth healthy tissue.  This won't.  It's nothing more than dried and pulvervised deer meat. Stem cells have to be LIVE and human (as far as I know) and be injected into the right spot to have any affect at all.  This is crap.      

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 5193
Joined: Jan 2013

They always turn on weekends, when our moderators are enjoying home life.  Someone will pop along at some point and remove the post. 

Tru

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

My son has been explaining how various cancers work and many work in different ways. It would be wonderful to have something simple that cures them all but biochemistry is unbelievably complex and this kind of cure is just not possible.

darcher's picture
darcher
Posts: 257
Joined: Jun 2017

It makes me angry that individuals like dkkaran even exist trying to take advantage of people who maybe on their last leg.  This deer placentia scam has been around for a lot of years and they even sell this garbage on amazon.  This is right up there with DCA and apricot seeds except a lot more expensive.  BTW, Mikenh I responded to your questions just under your post above.

Subscribe to Comments for "Adjuvant Chemo Therapy"